#1
The title kind of speaks for itself.
I was wondering who here uses the open-handed technique - or any variations of it - often.

I started drumming about 1&1/2 years ago but I don't own a kit and am left-handed.
I went to some drum lessons in my college but they were group lessons; I didn't want to be 'that guy' and end up reversing the kit every time i went to use it, so i just ended up playing open-handed/ambi-dextrous.

I play the hi-hat with my left but the ride with my right, it really helps with co-ordination and balance.

Plus, does anyone know any modern drummers who play open-handed, i can only think of Billy Cobham, the BFMV drummer, and the Coheed drummer.
#2
I play open handed exclusively (am naturally right handed), and in my opinion it is much more preferable to the traditional method-- I really dislike crossing my hands when I play in any circumstance. I have two hi-hats and two rides, one on either side of my kit, so I switch between the two a lot. I would say I usually play right hand lead more than left hand lead, but regardless I never cross my hands to play the hi-hats, or any other cymbal/drum on my kit.

For drummers that play open handed, check out Will Kennedy, Gene Hoglan, Travis Orbin, Carter Beauford, Bobby Jarzombek, Simon Phillips, Dom Famularo, Lenny White, Mike Bordin, Shawn Drover, Gorden Campbell, Mika Karppinen and Scott Travis.
#3
I've been playing drums for about a year, and I started out playing right-handed, but I found it too awkward crossing my arms, so I started playing ambidextrously/openhanded as well. I actually put one bright heavy ride I use primarily for the bell just to the left of my first tom (below my first crash) so I can use my left hand to get my hi-hats and that ride, and use my right to get to my other crashes, floor toms, and my second, darker, ride. Plus that guy pretty much got all of them... except Carter Beauford, probably one of the best open handed drummers out there. Plus Rammstein's Christoph "Doom" Schneider is known for sometimes switching from open-handed to right handed just to put on a little bit of a show.
#4
Wow, just checked out Carter Beauford.
My kind of drummer.

Does anyone have their hi-hat quite low down? I have mine about 1-2 inches above the snare, so I don't have to keep my left arm in an uncomfortable position when playing.

P.S. I mainly made this thread because I couldn't find much talk dedicated to OH drumming. Seems like a technique which doesn't get as much representation as other techniques (my drum instructor said he wasn't used to teaching someone who played open-handed).
#5
I'm actually surprised at drummers on forums, alot of them seem to think that OH drumming is just some sort of flashy gimmick when it can actually be helpful.

Having said that, I tend to do a lot of fills involving my hi hat and toms so being able to play left hand lead and OH was pretty much a necessity for carving my way of playing. But I don't do exclusively.

Also, I always have my hi hats low, just feels nicer and easier to get the more finer fills in. Most guys I know use 13" or 14" hi hats quite high, and then I come in with heavy 15" hats extremely low
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#6
Quote by Crazyedd123
Wow, just checked out Carter Beauford.
My kind of drummer.

Does anyone have their hi-hat quite low down? I have mine about 1-2 inches above the snare, so I don't have to keep my left arm in an uncomfortable position when playing.

P.S. I mainly made this thread because I couldn't find much talk dedicated to OH drumming. Seems like a technique which doesn't get as much representation as other techniques (my drum instructor said he wasn't used to teaching someone who played open-handed).
My hi-hat is also pretty low, I have no need to have it high to make powerful playing easier given that both my hands can move independently upwards and downwards. Although, it's not extremely low, but only a few inches above my snare.

Oh, another few that I thought of who play open handed exclusively would be Cameron Losch, Gary Chester, Alex Rudinger and Randy Black. There are a lot of people who employ it sometimes just to free themselves up to play something (like Niiko^^)-- for example Steve Smith plays Don't Stop Believing by Journey open handed to keep the hi-hat going whilst being able to move his right hand around to hit the toms. Also, Mike Heller (my teacher) employs it for playing in one of his bands, though not really any of the others. Ken Schalk does it from time to time, too.

Finally, yeah, it definitely is kind of underexposed IMO... I don't really see any reason to cross over, however many people see other drummers because obviously people who cross over are the BIG majority of a lot of drummers. However, when the hi-hat moved to arm height (instead of being played only with the left foot, which is when it was called a hi-sock/sock pedal because it was low on the ground) most jazz drummers were just used to playing the ride cymbal with the right hand so they just moved the hand over to play the hi-hats... personally it doesn't make much sense to me, but that doesn't mean cross over playing is bad at all. Some of the best drummers in the world play only cross over. However, for me personally it's just not my thing.
Last edited by Steve08 at Aug 26, 2011,
#7
I'm right handed, but will occassionally switch to open handed when it will serve me better.

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#8
I play cross handed but open handed playing actually helped my overall coordination, helped my left hand catch up with my right hand. Though sometimes it does feel awkward to me just because I've been playing cross handed for so long
#9
I keep my snare at a pretty heavy angle (Probably 10-20 degrees) and my hi hat is actually LOWER than the top of my snare by about an inch.

I actually did try to set it up open handed. I had my ride above my snare (To not use it as a crash, as I have a bad habit of doing that) and my hats between my two lowest toms, with my crash right above it and my splash on a claw above my mid tom. It worked till I tried to play YYZ, when my left hand didn't want to play the ride.
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#10
I'm learning how to be open handed.

I want to learn how to lead with both hands.

I feel it would come in handy someday.
#11
I like to play quarter notes and off beats open handed as much as I can, but I when ever I do anything faster I always lose it Great respect for anyone who can really pull off open handed drumming.
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