#1
I can sweep pick pretty good, but I don't know how to apply it into my playing. I've always been a fan of 'if it sounds good, then it's right' but nothing seems to come out this time. I do understand the concept that if a song is in Em, then my safest bet is to solo in Em but let's say I have this song in the key of C, and I wanna sweep over it, how do I do that? A friend told me I need to determine its scale degree? For example, a song in the key of C has C Dm Em F G Am Bo, I choose the appropriate arpeggio over the chord that's playing? Please advice. This topic has been bothering me for quite awhile.
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#2
If the song is in the key of C, you play in C. You can play the same arpeggio as the chord that's playing in the background. Get a C major backing track and experiment.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#3
If the song is in a key then when playing over the chords you:
Play in key
Play the relative
Play on a variation of the scale
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#4
First off, please understand that sweep picking is in no way a musical technique. Sweep picking is purely a technical technique (wow, that's not obtuse D=). That said, a question: When you say, 'if it sounds good, then it's right,' do you mean that you like sweep picking for its tonal quality, the fluid/legato sound that it creates, or that you like playing arpeggios, which are conveniently played with sweep picking?

Also, you don't have to use sweeping solely for playing arpeggios. You can actually sweep some decent pure leads if you have agile and accurate fingers. For your key of C part, you might sweep D>E>C>D>E>B^C. Tabbed (roughly).

E|-------------7^8----
B|-----------5---------
G|---------7-----------
D|------10------------
A|----7----------------
E|-10------------------

That idea and lines like it will also get your fingers into really good shape if you practice carefully and precisely. I hope that kind of idea helps you break out of the 'sweeps = arpeggios" mindset that seems locked in most competent sweep-pickers' minds.
You might could use some double modals.
#5
Quote by AETHERA
First off, please understand that sweep picking is in no way a musical technique. Sweep picking is purely a technical technique (wow, that's not obtuse D=). That said, a question: When you say, 'if it sounds good, then it's right,' do you mean that you like sweep picking for its tonal quality, the fluid/legato sound that it creates, or that you like playing arpeggios, which are conveniently played with sweep picking?

Also, you don't have to use sweeping solely for playing arpeggios. You can actually sweep some decent pure leads if you have agile and accurate fingers. For your key of C part, you might sweep D>E>C>D>E>B^C. Tabbed (roughly).

E|-------------7^8----
B|-----------5---------
G|---------7-----------
D|------10------------
A|----7----------------
E|-10------------------

That idea and lines like it will also get your fingers into really good shape if you practice carefully and precisely. I hope that kind of idea helps you break out of the 'sweeps = arpeggios" mindset that seems locked in most competent sweep-pickers' minds.

I second this. You don't always have to sweep arpeggios. It's just a technique to allow you to play notes in a certain way.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3