#1
One technique that I put off learning due to many failed attempts and angry case-slamming was sweeping. I know there are a lot of threads on here on how to gradually ease in the technique, and I'm reading them and starting slow again.

What I'd like to know, from those of you who are experts at it, is this: When you were comfortable doing full sweeps along 5, 6, 7 or more strings, how quickly were you able to improvise using this technique?

When I'm practicing, I like to mix up techniques as fluidly as possible to develop a sense of keeping rhythm. I'd like to be able to make up sweeps on the fly piecing from scales I already know - partials/string-skipping, any of that. Obviously I'm not expecting to just make up a perfect-sounding sweep at blazing speeds- I build off of random stuff that sounds good.

Does this question make sense? The reason I ask is that when I'm trying to learn a new sweep pattern, it takes me a while to memorize the motions. I have an excellent memory, but just can't seem to remember sweep patterns well. Mental block?
#2
I'm most comfortable when I play sweeps on a beanbag. Ok, jokes aside it take a while to get what your looking for but not far out of reach. Its no different than becoming fluid at any other technique IMO the more you playing and the more different ways you try them better and more fluid you get. Just don't stop practicing, play slow, use a metronome. I know it sucks but you'll get it.

- muscle memory takes time to get it, once you do you'll be a happy camper. Try playing on a beanbag hah.
#3
Don't just concentrate on the physical motions of what you're doing though, if you want to improvise with something (or at least do it well) then you need to be very aware of how it sounds. After all, how are you going to pull out a sound (which is what we should always be going for) if you don't know what sounds are produced by the things you can do?
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#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Don't just concentrate on the physical motions of what you're doing though, if you want to improvise with something (or at least do it well) then you need to be very aware of how it sounds. After all, how are you going to pull out a sound (which is what we should always be going for) if you don't know what sounds are produced by the things you can do?


That's a very valid point, and I totally understand that. I would develop a few scales to sweep to perfection beforehand and toss them in the "improv" toolbox.
#5
Well, I don't focus much on sweeping, but it started coming more naturally when improvising after I started learning every shape of the basic major and minor arpeggios, then transitioning between them over simple chord sequences.
#6
If you are improvising you should focus more on the actual notes you are playing, not the technique. Not sure about you but when I listen to a good solo I like to hear good phrasing, not random sweeping just for the sake of it.

With that said though, you need to understand exactly what sweeping is, which is the act of playing (most often) arpeggios on the guitar using a technique called sweeping (I'm sure you know how to sweep so I'm not going to explain that). If you know how to incorporate arpeggios into your playing, then you will know how to incorporate sweeping as well.
#7
Quote by zincabopataurio
If you are improvising you should focus more on the actual notes you are playing, not the technique. Not sure about you but when I listen to a good solo I like to hear good phrasing, not random sweeping just for the sake of it.

With that said though, you need to understand exactly what sweeping is, which is the act of playing (most often) arpeggios on the guitar using a technique called sweeping (I'm sure you know how to sweep so I'm not going to explain that). If you know how to incorporate arpeggios into your playing, then you will know how to incorporate sweeping as well.



Well, it would be actual notes. The way I look at a good solo, technique is icing on the cake. If it's an awful riff or lick to begin with, no sweep is going to fix it. It's something that is either technically correct or pleasing to the ears.

Much like we can improv using chords and sounds/shapes we're familiar with, I'd like to be able to mix it up by sweeping instead of playing a chord in the normal fashion. Just to "mix it up" a little.

I've been sitting here all day practicing it and I just can't seem to get to the next step. I have the motions down and can play some sweeps very quickly without error, but I feel like I'm not going anywhere just playing the same crap over and over. I guess the way I'm looking at it is you have to re-master the skill with each shape- am I correct?
#8
I guess the way I'm looking at it is you have to re-master the skill with each shape- am I correct?


No. If you have a good left hand it's not a big deal, you just need to get sweeping itself and the various direction changes down.
#9
Quote by Freepower
No. If you have a good left hand it's not a big deal, you just need to get sweeping itself and the various direction changes down.


I think I'm starting to get it. I've been practicing "Psalm of Lydia" by Nevermore for about 30 minutes a day in between other exercises and then just screwing around making crap up like normal. I have the first three bars of sweeps down at about 50% speed. It's the next step that I'm worrying about... Jeff's sweeps are blazing...
#10
That's not really one step, moving from 50% Loomis-level to 100% Loomis level.

Be especially wary of fluffing the middle of the sweep, nothings more horrible than someone who only really plays the bottom and top notes of a sweep through tons of gain. >.<
#11
Quote by CV334
I think I'm starting to get it. I've been practicing "Psalm of Lydia" by Nevermore for about 30 minutes a day in between other exercises and then just screwing around making crap up like normal. I have the first three bars of sweeps down at about 50% speed. It's the next step that I'm worrying about... Jeff's sweeps are blazing...


i don't know how he does it... I can say my sweeps are really fast and clean (I always practice on the bridge pickup to ensure they're tight) yet even with my "zero" effort that I apply with moving the fingers... Jeff is still faster somehow.


I find myself getting caught on the lower ends. Even in the 7-string sweeps I sometimes get bitch whipped when one of the minor inversions has this n --> n + 5 fret jump on the same string
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#12
I practice on a boosted clean channel so there is no distortion to hide behind. I want to hear my mistakes so I can correct them, and WOW do I hear a lot of mistakes