#1
I know most of them advertise a mahogany body. but the things are so plentiful Im certain I could find a good player out of them and swap in some GFS pickups or duncans, but I really am married to having a maple cap on the LP I eventually buy.

I dont care if the flame is veneered or not, as long as theres solid maple cap under the veneer (I imagine maple vs flamed maple isnt really tonally discernable).
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#2
I'm not sure about the maple cap, but I know the bodies actually also contain alder in addition to mahogany.
#3
Most just have a veneer, although the higher up models, maybe the Standard Plus has a maple cap.
#4
Electric guitar could be made out of gold for the heck of it, it won't affect the tone, pickups will
#5
Quote by Zeletros
Electric guitar could be made out of gold for the heck of it, it won't affect the tone, pickups will


Not true.
My Guitars
Squire Affinity Strat
Ibanez RG 350 DX
Fender Stratocaster MIM
Ibanez AEG20E
Tradition Guitars S2000F Pro
#6
the wood issue worries me, and I may end up going for an agile or tokai/edwards if I could afford a japanese one. Yes, I realize much better guitar for the money, but I may not have said money :P. I work at a gas station for 7.45 an hour and I may not even be able to keep the job in a week once school starts up.

but Im gassing for a les paul, and I feel like mahogany alone is too dark for the tone Im going for and I kinda feel like the maple cap brightens it up a little bit.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#8
Quote by Zeletros
You're right, amp is more important


Still not the point I was trying to get across...lol.
My Guitars
Squire Affinity Strat
Ibanez RG 350 DX
Fender Stratocaster MIM
Ibanez AEG20E
Tradition Guitars S2000F Pro
#9
Quote by PatheticMedic
Not true.


I did see some guitars made of metal and they seemed to sound good. I theorize that a lot of the sound you get from electric guitar might in fact be how the body resonates and "feeds back" vibration to the strings. Ive came to that conclusion after arguing every minute possibility of wood affecting tone to people who vehemently believe only it does not. the same people generally feel like output is the only important thing about pickups and that high is always good NO MATTER WHAT. Ive tried to explain why one might want lower output pickups as well but it usually falls on deaf ears. and why a little Dano Fab distortion pedal is not as good (and these are pros who get paid every day and im really just a hobbyist :P).

but anyway, yeah im kinda married to that idea of having a maple cap on it so I guess the epis are out unless I get one of the tributes (hard maple cap with flame veneer I believe, but like $700, for that price I could get a real nice agile)
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#10
Quote by Zeletros
You're right, amp is more important


I have a peavey jsx and a marshall class 5 I am not lacking in the amp department :P
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#11
The Maple cap on a Les Paul will brighten up the tone a bit, its not really the end of the world without it as all guitars will resonate differently due to the varying density of the various woods used. Tons of people would love to argue this fact with me but after playing several different guitars made from Mahogany, Alder, Swap Ash and Maple I honestly havent heard much of a tonal difference with an electric guitar. I think the biggest factor on an electric is probably the pickups, strings, bridge and tailpiece since its the resonance of the vibrating string that the pickup is err picking up! Oh and of course if its hollow body, semi hollow yada yada yada.

Acoustic's on the other had are a totally different beast and the wood will definitely effect the tone and sound of the guitar. Also as aforementioned the density of the wood and how dry the wood is will make a difference, I personally find the vintage guitars from the 50s and 60s to be a lot brighter and slightly louder and I have a hunch it's due to the wood completely drying out over time. This can all be heard and compared by playing any electric guitar unplugged like an acoustic.

The Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus is the first SKU I can think of from Epi that has a flamed maple top, is it a high quality top, meh probably not. But here in Vancouver I can pick one up for $585 other then that a used Tokai might be right up your alley.
Last edited by ne14t at Aug 26, 2011,
#13
Quote by ne14t
The Maple cap on a Les Paul will brighten up the tone a bit, its not really the end of the world without it as all guitars will resonate differently due to the varying density of the various woods used. Tons of people would love to argue this fact with me but after playing several different guitars made from Mahogany, Alder, Swap Ash and Maple I honestly havent heard much of a tonal difference with an electric guitar. I think the biggest factor on an electric is probably the pickups, strings, bridge and tailpiece since its the resonance of the vibrating string that the pickup is err picking up! Oh and of course if its hollow body, semi hollow yada yada yada.

Acoustic's on the other had are a totally different beast and the wood will definitely effect the tone and sound of the guitar. Also as aforementioned the density of the wood and how dry the wood is will make a difference, I personally find the vintage guitars from the 50s and 60s to be a lot brighter and slightly louder and I have a hunch it's due to the wood completely drying out over time. This can all be heard and compared by playing any electric guitar unplugged like an acoustic.

The Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus is the first SKU I can think of from Epi that has a flamed maple top, is it a high quality top, meh probably not. But here in Vancouver I can pick one up for $585 other then that a used Tokai might be right up your alley.


This, but without all the big words.

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#14
Quote by Zeletros
Electric guitar could be made out of gold for the heck of it, it won't affect the tone, pickups will

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You don't need epic tone in the bedroom any more than you need mood lighting to masturbate.


#15
Quote by spiroth10
I did see some guitars made of metal and they seemed to sound good. I theorize that a lot of the sound you get from electric guitar might in fact be how the body resonates and "feeds back" vibration to the strings.

that's exactly it, and a good way of explaining it too.

the pickups don't respond to anything other than the strings, because they are magnetic, and that's the argument that most of these "wood doesn't matter" guys stick to, but they are always ignoring the influence the resonance of the body has on the vibration of the strings, and the fact that the pickups can only work with what they are given by the strings. in it's most basic form, a pickup is just a shit-load of copper wire wrapped around a magnet anyway.
Rig Winter 2017:

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#16
+1

Strings vibrate.
Pickups are mounted in wood.
Wood vibrates, different woods vibrate differently.

It's that interaction that gives you the subtle differences in tones , and it's part of the reason that two identical guitars with identical pickups can still sound diferent...because two pieces of the same wood will vibrate slightly differently. They're only subtle differences, but like everything else they get amplified when you plug in.
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#17
lots of mis imformation here. only the very highest end Epi's have an actual maple cap. the recent Slash epi for example does. the standard, custom and plus top have a veneer but not an actual maple cap. the new LP tribute plus model does have a maple cap however it costs around $800- 900. some of the cheaper gibson LP models don't feature a maple cap either. actually in the 50s the LP customs didn't either.
#18
Quote by Zeletros
Electric guitar could be made out of gold for the heck of it, it won't affect the tone, pickups will






good one!!
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#19
Quote by monwobobbo
lots of mis imformation here. only the very highest end Epi's have an actual maple cap. the recent Slash epi for example does. the standard, custom and plus top have a veneer but not an actual maple cap. the new LP tribute plus model does have a maple cap however it costs around $800- 900. some of the cheaper gibson LP models don't feature a maple cap either. actually in the 50s the LP customs didn't either.


+1.
the veneer on my lp standard plus top is like 1mm thick if that.

\/+1 there too. My lp came w/ emg 81, it was still way brighter then my Se torero and didnt get muddy on the low end.
Lp now with tone zone/air norton is by far the best sounding guitar I own (and cheapest ), but Im putting a BKP aftermath in my rg370 once my iron warms up
Last edited by DimebagZappa at Aug 26, 2011,
#20
I think on most Epi's the back of the body is mahogany and the top is alder. On some, they have a thin veneer. On high end models it's an actual maple cap. With a pickup change, Epi's can be alright guitars. I was just never sold on them.

Wood is really important to tone. It runs the spectrum from mahogany, which is warm and kind of dark, to basswood, which is not quite as dark and has a big midrange, to alder which is close to the center in terms of bright and dark, and then maple which is really heavy and really bright. There are a ton of different woods, but those are the big 4 if you will. Pickups work with what they're given. Even EMGs act different in different woods.
#21
On most Epi's I've ever come across, it's been solid mahogany. In the end, a maple top will have no difference on the end tone. I used to think it would, until I started reading a few different articles, and talking to different luthiers. Many of them said that what tone is gained from the wood, will end up not being transferred very well to the pickups, and that in the end, a cheap guitar sounds cheap because of pickups.

Whatever you like though. I'm not saying that you shouldn't get what you want (and I mean that honestly. I dont want to be the one to stop you because I don't believe in tonewoods.) When I was hunting for a new guitar, I was married to the fact that I wanted three humbuckers. I ended up finding one that suited my style and my needs, and then bought a few days later.
#22
Quote by tonello
On most Epi's I've ever come across, it's been solid mahogany. In the end, a maple top will have no difference on the end tone. I used to think it would, until I started reading a few different articles, and talking to different luthiers. Many of them said that what tone is gained from the wood, will end up not being transferred very well to the pickups, and that in the end, a cheap guitar sounds cheap because of pickups.

Whatever you like though. I'm not saying that you shouldn't get what you want (and I mean that honestly. I dont want to be the one to stop you because I don't believe in tonewoods.) When I was hunting for a new guitar, I was married to the fact that I wanted three humbuckers. I ended up finding one that suited my style and my needs, and then bought a few days later.


Ive had a inf 4, dimebucker, tone zone and bkp aftermath in my rg370dx. Every single pickup has been muddy as hell. The bkp is a bit more crisp throughout the low notes but still muddy. The tone zone I removed and placed into my epi lp, its not muddy at all, indeed very bright. The emg 81 the lp came with was also very bright compared to my prs se w/81/85. Imo tone woods makes a huge difference. Basswood to mahogany was entirely different with the same pickup. Although 2 guitars made of mahogany with maple tops and veneers sounded entirely differently with the same pickup.
#23
Quote by tonello
On most Epi's I've ever come across, it's been solid mahogany. In the end, a maple top will have no difference on the end tone. I used to think it would, until I started reading a few different articles, and talking to different luthiers. Many of them said that what tone is gained from the wood, will end up not being transferred very well to the pickups, and that in the end, a cheap guitar sounds cheap because of pickups.

Whatever you like though. I'm not saying that you shouldn't get what you want (and I mean that honestly. I dont want to be the one to stop you because I don't believe in tonewoods.) When I was hunting for a new guitar, I was married to the fact that I wanted three humbuckers. I ended up finding one that suited my style and my needs, and then bought a few days later.


the maple top does indeed influence the sound. just lay a LP with one and one without and you will notice the difference. oh and wood does make a difference in sound.