#1
Hi
I have an Ibanez GRX40 guitar and recently it started to lose its tune........ upwards!!
I always tune in playing position so the weight of the neck doesn't have any influence.
It happened a few times already. I keep my guitar in a cloth case inside a closet, and when I take it out and play a few minutes I notice that, and my tuner confirms that.
What could it be ?

BTW the only thing I changed in the last months is blocking my tremolo with some wood. It's really really tight I had to use a hammer and it took me 30 mintues to get it in there even though I used my tremolo to make sure the bridge is all the way down, so there really isn't any gap or movement whatsoever there, not even 0.01 mm.

Oh and I'm not a native English speaker so if the term "losses tune upwards" isn't clear : The strings become tighter and get higher pitch over time.

And another question, my third string buzzes in EVERY SINGLE FRET !! Only when its open it doesn't buzz. My fret are pretty much leveled, I have almost zero buzz in all the other strings except the low E that does the same. It is set up significantly higher than the second string and if you compare their action, the neck radius definitely doesn't require such an action difference. What could it be? I'm almost certain it was like that since I got the guitar 4 years ago.

Thanks guys!!!
#2
The neck is just straightening due to humidity or temperature changes. If the neck doesn't move, strings go flat. If the neck moves, it can go either way since it will stretch or loosen the strings.

For your buzzing string, have you checked the saddles and nut? This sounds like maybe a loose or bad saddle or a bad nut slot.
#3
I forgot to mention, when I tune the strings I play chords on all the strings and strum pretty hard, to make sure everything's tight. Sometimes it makes a few strings more loose, so after that it stays in tune better.
#4
Quote by Roc8995
The neck is just straightening due to humidity or temperature changes. If the neck doesn't move, strings go flat. If the neck moves, it can go either way since it will stretch or loosen the strings.

For your buzzing string, have you checked the saddles and nut? This sounds like maybe a loose or bad saddle or a bad nut slot.


Thanks for the fast reply
I didn't have this problem in the last 3.5 years so I believe something has changed. I mean, I have a really cheap tuner, I can here significant changes in pitch when I tune the octaves for example, and it says the string it tuned. So if this tuner says the pitch goes higher, it goes unreasonably higher
And about the buzzing string, it happens only when fretted so it can't be the nut, but my saddle looks fine, nothing special in the string slot, and I already tried to play with everything with the saddle and put some pencil lead on it...
#5
My thought is that if you blocked the tremolo very tightly with some wood, and had to use a hammer to get it in place, you probably compressed the wood. With time, the stress from the wood is fighting the tremolo, and the wood is expanding, pushing on the trem block, and pulling your strings slightly sharp...
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#6
Quote by Musicman48858
My thought is that if you blocked the tremolo very tightly with some wood, and had to use a hammer to get it in place, you probably compressed the wood. With time, the stress from the wood is fighting the tremolo, and the wood is expanding, pushing on the trem block, and pulling your strings slightly sharp...


Oh well that's a clever thought
But the tremolo is already 100% stuck in the guitar body itself and if I try to push it with the tremolo it won't move for sure.
On the one hand, that doesn't look so reasonable but maybe the pressure is so hard that the bridge get into the finish over time ? But on the other hand the "wood" I put there isn't exactly a wood, I cut it from an old shelf that sat outside (including in rain so it might have expanded) for about 2 or 3 years already, that thing is more like 10 pieces of really thin wood/MDF glued together, it might be known as a "sandwich" but I'm not sure. So I expect the pressure to compress it if anything... And yeah I know that I can get a lot more sound transfer from the bridge to the body with a real wood than that thing but I don't have any real wood and I'm not really motivated cause from what I've seen it studies the wood doesn't really affect the amplitude/frequency of the string vibration (the vibration frequency not the complex sound spectrum) therefor the electric signal out of the guitar isn't affected by that.

Well, back to my problems
#8
Quote by Musicman48858
My thought is that if you blocked the tremolo very tightly with some wood, and had to use a hammer to get it in place, you probably compressed the wood. With time, the stress from the wood is fighting the tremolo, and the wood is expanding, pushing on the trem block, and pulling your strings slightly sharp...

Personally, I think this is more likely than roc's answer. I'd advise not using a hammer on any part of your guitar ever again...

A possible solution to the problem is adjusting your intonation. Since you're gaining pitch as you move up the neck, I'd suggest moving the saddle back > that way for a right hander. I'm not sure what type of bridge you have, so you might have to fuigure that out for yourself.

As for the fret buzz, try raising your action. Actually, now that I think about it, Roc's answer, regarding the neck changing shape is probably right. You may need to adjust your truss rod. Check to see if that's the problem first. Don't just dive straight in.
#9
Quote by Butt Rayge
Personally, I think this is more likely than roc's answer. I'd advise not using a hammer on any part of your guitar ever again...

A possible solution to the problem is adjusting your intonation. Since you're gaining pitch as you move up the neck, I'd suggest moving the saddle back > that way for a right hander. I'm not sure what type of bridge you have, so you might have to fuigure that out for yourself.

As for the fret buzz, try raising your action. Actually, now that I think about it, Roc's answer, regarding the neck changing shape is probably right. You may need to adjust your truss rod. Check to see if that's the problem first. Don't just dive straight in.


I gain pitch over time on open strings (actually in every fret not just open). My intonation is set up right, I get the same note open and 12 fret, but the strings get higher pitch over time.
And as for my third string, it can't be the action because like I said, it is considerably higher than the second string, so no reason for it to get any higher than that (it's already very high). And it buzzes from first to last fret so it can't be the truss rod (which is adjusted right and I have no problems with other strings)
#10
Alright. Now we know what the problem isn't.

Now we need to find out what it is.

For the tuning, I'd say the compression of the wood block you hammered in is a likely explanation. As for the buzz, I could only think that there may be some problem with the saddle or nut.

Is the buzzing audible through an amp, or is it totally acoustic?
#11
Quote by Butt Rayge
Alright. Now we know what the problem isn't.

Now we need to find out what it is.

For the tuning, I'd say the compression of the wood block you hammered in is a likely explanation. As for the buzz, I could only think that there may be some problem with the saddle or nut.

Is the buzzing audible through an amp, or is it totally acoustic?


I can here it when playing in the clean channel and I'm sure it comes from the string and nothing moves on the guitar. It happens when fretted so I don't think the nut play a rule when fretted? The string vibrations after and before a fret is completely separated as far as I know. So it's the saddle? I can't change it or something, it's a cheap Ibanez Gio bridge so I won't find any replacement parts (and even if I will it'll be to pricey with shipping for me). What can I do if it is the saddle ?
#12
Sorry for the bump but I really need your help ppl
My guitar keeps gaining higher pitch and the bridge doesn't move at all It has no room for movement not even 0.05 milimeter
Could it really be the wood expanding so much that the tremolo block pushes the tremolo even lower (although like I said I don't think there's any room for the bridge to go lower on the guitar finish) ? Anyone has any idea ?
#13
Quote by gnr_tb
I forgot to mention, when I tune the strings I play chords on all the strings and strum pretty hard, to make sure everything's tight. Sometimes it makes a few strings more loose, so after that it stays in tune better.

To prevent that, you should always tune up and not tune down. Simple, if it's sharp, tune down and then tune up to the correct note. Don't just tune down. With most nuts (specially crappy plastic nuts, but also with others), the string will catch, and when you play, it'll go flat.

About your original problem, I'm not sure I understand what it is, but if it's a matter of intonation, intonate your guitar. If even after intonating it you have problems, your strings are needing a change, so buy a new set and restring your axe.
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#14
Quote by Tiago Sa
To prevent that, you should always tune up and not tune down. Simple, if it's sharp, tune down and then tune up to the correct note. Don't just tune down. With most nuts (specially crappy plastic nuts, but also with others), the string will catch, and when you play, it'll go flat.

About your original problem, I'm not sure I understand what it is, but if it's a matter of intonation, intonate your guitar. If even after intonating it you have problems, your strings are needing a change, so buy a new set and restring your axe.


I do tune up only
That never happened in the last 4 years and I didn't change anything except the tremolo

My main problem is that I leave the guitar tuned very well for a few hours/a day, then when I come back all the strings go sharper.