#1
Alright, so 3 weeks ago I posted about putting .11s on my guitar going from .10s, and after I found that tightening the screws and adding another spring into the back did very little to solve the problems I was having with my raised bridge, I restrung the E, A, D strings to .10s. While this did lower my bridge significantly, I am still seeing uneven string heights across my guitar. I have little string height in the first few frets, (1-3), as opposed to very high string height in the top frets (16-21.) I was going to adjust the truss rod but I'm not exactly sure what to do to make my strings parallel. The bridge of the guitar is somewhat raised out of the guitar if this makes a difference.
What should I do to combat my string height problem? Also, is it ok to mix string gauges on the fretboard, ex. can I put 4 .11 gauge strings and 2 .10s or vice versa?
#2
What's your guitar, and what bridge system does it have?

What the hell do you mean, "mix string gauges"? A typical set is .010, .013, .017, .026, .036, .046.

What you need to do is put on a normal set of strings and then adjust string height from the bridge.
Quote by Boonnoo666
Another factor that has grown this myth is a bunch of opinionated guys who really don't know what they're talking about, which to be brutally honest is a bunch of you guys on here.
Last edited by Strat007 at Aug 26, 2011,
#3
Mixing gauges is fine. A lot of guitarists who use open tunings use that method to get even tension and they make string sets that have a light top/heavy bottom. You won't hurt anything there. While adding a spring might help, an important thing to remember is that the tension of the springs is important too. In the tremolo cavity, you'll see two screws attached to the trem claws. You'll need to tighten those in order to put more tension on the springs and in turn, lower your bridge. Maybe consider adding a 5th spring, but it's really up to how you want the trem to feel.

But I'm betting those screws need tightened up a bit.
#4
I'm using a MIM Fender strat with the stock bridge in it. I'm not comfortable tightening the screws because the previous owner of the guitar clearly replaced the screws and did an all around bad job and changing anything in the cavity makes me nervous. If tightening the screws is the last resort then I will do it but i don't want to do it unless absolutely necessary.
#5
It's not hard and won't hurt anything. Look for where the ring is on the end of the spring, you'll probably see a ground wire there too. It's just those two screws there. It's not in the cavity under the pickguard, it's a separate one on the back. I don't have any idea why you'd change those screws. They're just there to work with the tension.

It's a Strat. You can't really do anything to one that can't be undone. And from experience you learn best when you have to do it hands on. It's really not hard. You won't cause any lasting damage.
#6
^what he said about the springs in the back cavity. Tighten them to lower the back end of the bridge. You want the bridge to be roughly parallel to the body.



See the twelve screws at the very top of the bridge? They control individual string height. They're adjusted in pairs; two per string. Play around with these once the bridge and body are parallel.
Quote by Boonnoo666
Another factor that has grown this myth is a bunch of opinionated guys who really don't know what they're talking about, which to be brutally honest is a bunch of you guys on here.
Last edited by Strat007 at Aug 26, 2011,
#7
I read an interview with Jeff Beck where he said a Fender employee told him the best tuning stability comes from having a bridge at 45 degrees. I tried that, but being used to TOMs for about 10 years, I kept putting too much pressure and when I'd try to do like a single note line, it'd go slightly sharp. I'm used to anchoring my hand behind the TOMs. Plus I never noticed a real noticeable difference in stability. Might work for Jeff, not for me though.

I've always kept my Strat bridges flat on the body. They held in tune live and while recording just fine.