#1
hello recording forum , i have everything that i need for recording with my
computer except a pair of nearfield monitors im thinking on purchasing the
Yamaha HS80m .

the thing is my setup is not that elaborate consisting of a computer ,
Maudio fast track pro , and a set of SONY $20 headphones is those monitors
to expensive for such a insignificant setup I'm thinking that good monitors is the most
important thing .

thx for the responses in advance.
#2
As a proud owner of the HS80m's, I'd have to say you're making an excellent choice.

Keep in mind, if you're in an untreated room, you'll run into a lot of problems. Thankfully, they have some EQ adjustments on the back that help, but you'll have to spend time finding the best spot in your room and perhaps investing in some treatment down the road.

I'm sure people will suggest spending less or buying some others in the price range, but I can tell you from personal experience and a lot of research, these things are the best you'll get for the money hands down. The only reason I would suggest cheaper ones is if you're not really serious about recording. If you see yourself sticking with it for at least a few years, you might as well get some monitors that will last that long and wont need upgrading.
#4
The HS80Ms are pretty nice speakers, but for most people, it's either you love, or you hate them. I would not suggest them as your first pair of monitors, because you're going to run into a lot of problems having your mixes translate well to other forms of listening, because the lowend is pretty weak on them, and you will tend to over compensate by adding in a lot of bass.

In the same price range, you could get some M-Audio DSM2 or DSM3s. I just upgraded my KRK Rokit 5s that I've been using for a few years to a pair of the DSM3s and they absolutely SLAY! I was willing to spend the extra cash on a pair of Adam A7s or A7Xs, but for the price AudioMIDI.com is selling the DSMs for right now (which include a pair of free Auralex MoPads), and based on the rave reviews I'd seen of them, I decided to give them a shot. I'm very happy I did. I ended up A/Bing them with my friend's A7s and I much prefer the DSM3s - While they might not have the aggressive midrange the Adams have, which I really dug, they are super balanced and have a HUGE stereo field, the bass is just right and audio is extremely clear through them.

The DSM2s are currently at $500 a pair (search around on the internet and you can get a 5% off code and get them even cheaper) and the DSM3s are $600, plus you get $50 worth of MoPads for free... Keep in mind, these monitors were $1600 for the pair before they were discontinued.
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Last edited by MatrixClaw at Aug 27, 2011,
#5
I have found that the only time the HS80's bass was lacking was due to room issues. Other than that they're very flat. If you're used to the KRK sound then of course they'll sound weak in the low end, but that's only because cheap KRKs boost the low end too far.

951, if you have the chance, compare a few different monitors in a store before you buy. As much as I think the Yamaha's will beat the pants off of anything from M-Audio or KRK, your ears should make the final call.
#6
I'm impressed, so far noone has mentioned NS-10's in relation to the HS series... I guess my nagging everytime they were mentioned paid off At last, noone falsely claiming they're anything like the fabled NS-10s
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#7
^^i've read of the ns-10's there what most studios use they were very popular and every time i see an interview with someone at a control board that's what i usually see .

Quote by sandyman323
I have found that the only time the HS80's bass was lacking was due to room issues. Other than that they're very flat. If you're used to the KRK sound then of course they'll sound weak in the low end, but that's only because cheap KRKs boost the low end too far.

951, if you have the chance, compare a few different monitors in a store before you buy. As much as I think the Yamaha's will beat the pants off of anything from M-Audio or KRK, your ears should make the final call.


here is the thing with monitor speakers , they are supposed to be as flat response as
they possibly can , to me most new recording people (as i am with nearfield's) will gravitate to richer fuller sound as with speakers that are sweetened in some way .

so it kind of makes me weary to test different monitors out do to the fact that i might
pick the ones that are sweetened instead of getting use to the ones that are flat response
to get the best sound . again i am new to recording with nearfield's so my thoughts are based on what i have read and not experience .
#8
I think you're making a good choice. I have a friend who has these and they're wonderful. Listening to my own mixes on those monitors was really quite an experience.

Best bet for trying out monitors: Bring some of your own mixes. See which ones expose the weaknesses of your own mixes. Bring some material that you know is really well produced and that has lots of detail. I often use some classic Van Morrison or something like that. If you hear things that you have never heard before, such as:
-the sound of the rosin on the strings
-a turning page
-an instrument that, until now, you never realized was there

... then you know you've got a good set.

Basically, it should give you an experience like you're listening with an aural microscope, or from the top of a panoramic mountaintop with a high-powered telescope more so than listening from a concert theatre.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Basically what Chris said - I tend to listen to stuff I love the mix of, and see if it improves or worsens the mix. A great mix should be designed to sound best on flat monitors anyway, as this is the aim of mixing/mastering (unless you're doing so for a specific scenario, i.e club mix, mix for iPods/mp3 players, tv etc.), so if things crop up in a pro mix that worsen it, it's usually a sign that something is up with either the speakers or the acoustics of their environment.

Until you are more proficient and have a larger, more developed portfolio though (sorry, just assumptions on my part I probably shouldn't make!) I would advise against using your own mixes, as if you have mixed to a 'so-so' standard, you may think that some speakers that have colouration similar to those you mixed on are actually better than ones that tell the real picture.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 27, 2011,