#1
So ive been recording some tracks with only my digitech death metal pedal through the mic input on my computer and I was curious, I know an interface would get me better quality but how much better? Im not looking for large format studio quality obviously but something that would sound good to me and most other people that would listen to it. My pedal has a mixer out which you can use to record with and it says you can use it for this purpose in the manual.

EDIT: Also may as well ask since im here anyway and I can combine this with my other question, good drum programs for death metal/thrash songs? Preferably free or low cost would be great.

Also Ive been using audacity but just started using reaper if that matters.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
Last edited by Lethal Dosage at Aug 27, 2011,
#2
It will be a huge increase in quality. Definitely worth it.

You might be better off getting a Line6 UX1 or UX2 and use PodFarm instead of trying to go through that pedal. Best yet, mic a decent amp.

Before you decide on an interface, think about a few things. What's your budget, what do you want to record (electric, acoustic, drums, vocals...), do you see yourself sticking with this for a while and maybe expanding the setup later on, and does your computer have Firewire ports or only USB.
#3
Reaper is great, good move. And yes, getting an interface WILL get you so, so much more quality when compared to the method you're using now. If you're just recording guitars, you really don't have to spend a whole lot more than 100 dollars (the Line 6 Pod Studio GX is 99 euros, about 70 or 80 dollars?).

Edit: Just read sandyman323's reply, I was typing this when he posted it, didn't see it until after I posted this.

In reply to sandyman; if this dude is playing with a Digitech Death Metal pedal in the first place, I'm guessing that he doesn't have an awesome tube amp; more likely a Spider or something. This is not something you want to mic. Also, mic'ing amps is the biggest ****ing hassle I know in untreated rooms. It's just near impossible.

As a beginner recording, get yourself something that you can record your guitar DI with, then use VST's to create the tone. 99% guaranteed "proper" tone.
Last edited by Eryth at Aug 27, 2011,
#4
I actually use a dime signature halfstack which has good tone and everything but I just like the tone put out by the pedal more. I only have usb ports I believe. I would be doing guitars and maybe some bass tracks but the drum tracks would be made in a drum machine or program as I dont have a band at the moment. Its kind of like a dethklok/metalocalypse type situation in that for now im doing everything myself until I can find people that are interested in playing the same music. I do have a vocalist so i dont have to do the vocals just all the instrumental tracks.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#5
If you're doing just guitar/bass the UX1/2 would be absolutely perfect for you. It has a guitar input and one or two XLR microphone inputs (UX1 has one, UX2 has two). Also, it's an USB interface.
#6
i've recorded some tracks trough the mic input in my pc as well. recently i bought an audio interface (a cheaper one, fast track pro) and i have been recording with 2 shure sm57 mics in front of the amp. it was a b*tch to get that stuff set up and running but with some tweaking you can get close to cd quality. without spending hours of messing with the sound to get the best quality as possible it still sounds 100 times better than recording with your sound card.

if you can spare the money i can highly recommend it
#7
Quote by vince1991
i've recorded some tracks trough the mic input in my pc as well. recently i bought an audio interface (a cheaper one, fast track pro) and i have been recording with 2 shure sm57 mics in front of the amp. it was a b*tch to get that stuff set up and running but with some tweaking you can get close to cd quality. without spending hours of messing with the sound to get the best quality as possible it still sounds 100 times better than recording with your sound card.

if you can spare the money i can highly recommend it


This is just not true. With an untreated room you'll never get close to CD quality when recording with microphones. Getting the right amp sims and VST's will get you way, way closer, even with decent microphone placement techniques.

That aside, doing microphone placement will take hours, and it's not the goal of the OP to create CD-quality recordings if I read his post correctly; he just wants to record some jams.
Last edited by Eryth at Sep 5, 2011,
#8
Quote by Eryth
This is just not true. With an untreated room you'll never get close to CD quality when recording with microphones. Getting the right amp sims and VST's will get you way, way closer, even with decent microphone placement techniques.

That aside, doing microphone placement will take hours, and it's not the goal of the OP to create CD-quality recordings if I read his post correctly; he just wants to record some jams.

Thanks for resurrecting a thread that died a week ago, but anyway:

If you are on about mics vs amp sims - I could argue that neither are that effective in the hands of beginners (for 'CD quality') and both can obtain very usable results "for a CD" when used properly. Also, you don't need a treated room to get great results - you just need to understand acoustics. I've had plenty of great results in untreated rooms just by reducing reflections to the mic's responsive areas and putting the amp and mic in the right place (not to mention close-miking with a cardioid mic gets rid of 85+% of room reflections that would ever be audible). 9/10 though, a mic'd amp at full whack will sound better than a DI through amp sims, purely because of the physics behind why an amp sounds so desirable (air movement/pressure changes through the sound waves, and the anomalies of valves being driven beyond their clean power level vs digital approximations of what an analogue process might sound like in a world of discrete values).

What you say does make some sense, and it's probably easier for a beginner to get good results with an amp sim, but I'm mainly arguing because you said the other stuff wasn't true and claimed you would 'never' get CD quality (ignoring whatever CD-quality means, which is very subjective and not definable in one way - perhaps 'professional quality' is a better term?).

Also, if the guy has no interface - recording an amp at a high enough volume and simply running that into a mic in that has no proper preamp stage will probably sound much better than plugging a guitar pedal into the mic in and having a nasty signal going into the stock soundcard.


Edit: Oh, and doing anything to a professional level will 'take hours', whether that be setting up microphones and getting the right sound at the source, or tweaking the settings of an amp sim. Your point isn't really valid in that sense.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Sep 5, 2011,