#1
How do you do a power chord proply. I can move my fingers its just I tend to play all the strings rather than the 3 I need. Is there a way to mute the other strings while playing the power chord easy?
#2
Generally, your index finger plays the root note, and mutes all other strings, and even if it doesn't, you shouldn't have a problem with the other strings anyway because you shouldn't be strumming them, the index just kind of holds them still from feedback and slight movement that will translate into more sound.
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#3
if your playing a power chord with the root on the 6th string, practice using your fretting hand to lightly touch the rest of the strings. If you play a chord with the root on the 5th string, I usually use my middle finger to rest on the 6th string.
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#5
i usually only play 2 strings in powerchords. and i use my index and pinky finger for that. my pinky mutes all the other strings.
Last edited by one-dead-cop at Aug 27, 2011,
#6
Sort of like a barre chord but the other strings are muted so i can strum all the way down?
#7
Root 6 string power chord: First finger 6 string, pinky 5 string. Use first to press 6 string down AND lighly clip the rest of the strings to mute them out. This frees you up to strum as aggresively as you want without any unwanted noise.

Root 5 string power chord: Exactly the same as previous, except position first finger to be pressing down root (5 string) AND sitting against the bottom of the 6 string at the same time to keep it muted out.

The "third" note of a power chord is just a repeat of the first (octave) which is why its not really necessary and so many players just use the 2 note version.
#8
Root- Index
5th- Ring
Octave - Pinky

Middle finger mutes lower strings

Index finger mutes higher strings by barring them without pressure
#10
Quote by mrbabo91
Root- Index
5th- Ring
Octave - Pinky

Middle finger mutes lower strings

Index finger mutes higher strings by barring them without pressure


Your middle finger should really have nothing to do with a power chord, as there is no reason for it. Your first finger should be doing all the muting.
#11
Quote by PogBoy
Your middle finger should really have nothing to do with a power chord, as there is no reason for it. Your first finger should be doing all the muting.


If your playing a powerchord with the root on the A then the quikest and easiest way to mute the E is to rest your middle finger over the top of it
#12
Mute the other strings w/ your index finger. It's proper technique not to strum the unwanted strings in the first place, but we all get lazy sometimes xD
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And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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#13
Quote by mrbabo91
If your playing a powerchord with the root on the A then the quikest and easiest way to mute the E is to rest your middle finger over the top of it



For the most part you do want to be using your index finger in that situation.
#14
Quote by mrbabo91
If your playing a powerchord with the root on the A then the quikest and easiest way to mute the E is to rest your middle finger over the top of it


And no, the easiest and quickest way to mute the low E string for power chords with a root on the A string is to use the tip of the index finger. The middle finger's only job in power chords is to flip people off.
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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#15
Quote by Lennon993
It's proper technique not to strum the unwanted strings in the first place


Thats funny, and so wrong.
#16
Sorry to dissagree but i see no disadvantage to using your middle to mute the lower strings. It's just sitting there, you may as well use it and its not exactly hard to just lay it over the string below.

However this is just my opinion. If it gets the job done and its not going to cause long term problems then mute the strings however you want.
#17
Quote by mrbabo91
Sorry to dissagree but i see no disadvantage to using your middle to mute the lower strings. It's just sitting there, you may as well use it and its not exactly hard to just lay it over the string below.

However this is just my opinion. If it gets the job done and its not going to cause long term problems then mute the strings however you want.



How about if you want to embellish the power chord into minor shape in this instance? You need your finger to form the minor third and the index to mute the low E.
#18
Sometimes it's useful to have your middle finger muting the lower string to prevent any natural harmonics. For example if you're playing an A5 from the 5th fret E-string, you can easily get the 5th fret harmonic (E). If you have your middle finger sitting on the E-string you may not get that harmonic.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#19
Quote by GrStMyGn
How about if you want to embellish the power chord into minor shape in this instance? You need your finger to form the minor third and the index to mute the low E.


You have got a point . I just picked up the guitar and realised i mutethe low e with both my middle and my index anyway.
#20
Quote by PogBoy
Thats funny, and so wrong.

And yet perfectly true.
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#21
Quote by steven seagull
And yet perfectly true.


When you are playing a power chord progression using a standard strumming pattern, say D-DU- UDU youre telling me that youre only supposed to strum the 2 notes of the power chord in an extremely small limited range of motion? Sorry, youre so wrong its scary. Thats why you mute out the other strings, so you can free up your range of motion and strum freely.

Edit: To clarify, if you are doing anything that involves all down strums such as a palm muted metal riff, then yes, you want to be string specific on the notes of the power chords. When using an actual multi directional strumming pattern, its necessary for the continuity of the rhythm to strum just like you would a "full" chord using 5 or 6 strings. Thus you need to mute out unwanted strings, and strum away.
Last edited by PogBoy at Aug 28, 2011,
#22
Quote by steven seagull
And yet perfectly true.


Hehe, beat me to it.
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
___________________________________________________
#23
Quote by PogBoy
When you are playing a power chord progression using a standard strumming pattern, say D-DU- UDU youre telling me that youre only supposed to strum the 2 notes of the power chord in an extremely small limited range of motion? Sorry, youre so wrong its scary. Thats why you mute out the other strings, so you can free up your range of motion and strum freely.

Edit: To clarify, if you are doing anything that involves all down strums such as a palm muted metal riff, then yes, you want to be string specific on the notes of the power chords. When using an actual multi directional strumming pattern, its necessary for the continuity of the rhythm to strum just like you would a "full" chord using 5 or 6 strings. Thus you need to mute out unwanted strings, and strum away.


1.Start tremolo strumming chords (fast black metal type chord strumming) with full range of motion, from your elbow.
2. enjoy your tendonitis
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#24
Quote by PogBoy
When you are playing a power chord progression using a standard strumming pattern, say D-DU- UDU youre telling me that youre only supposed to strum the 2 notes of the power chord in an extremely small limited range of motion? Sorry, youre so wrong its scary. Thats why you mute out the other strings, so you can free up your range of motion and strum freely.

Edit: To clarify, if you are doing anything that involves all down strums such as a palm muted metal riff, then yes, you want to be string specific on the notes of the power chords. When using an actual multi directional strumming pattern, its necessary for the continuity of the rhythm to strum just like you would a "full" chord using 5 or 6 strings. Thus you need to mute out unwanted strings, and strum away.


the fact that you're wrong isn't what's scary. the fact that you're asserting this crock as fact is what's scary. it's not about limiting your range of motion. your range of motion is free. you're just not using all of it. it's about efficiency. and attack. but mostly efficiency.

if this is how you rationalize your poor technique, then by all means. as long as you can sleep at night. just don't spread it around, lest you negatively impact others.
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#25
Quote by hr113
1.Start tremolo strumming chords (fast black metal type chord strumming) with full range of motion, from your elbow.
2. enjoy your tendonitis

This pretty much. It will sound crap as well.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#27
Quote by PogBoy
Such noobs. Go pull up videos of your heros if you need proof.


...damn, you were a good troll. didn't even notice. you got me.
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#28
I challenge anyone to show me one video of a band playing power chords where when they are strumming they are not using a natural full range of motion and instead using tiny movements on 2 strings only. Go.

P.S. How do you rookies go about playing octaves without hitting the muted string in the middle since that would be "poor technique" right? :/
#29
Quote by PogBoy
When you are playing a power chord progression using a standard strumming pattern, say D-DU- UDU youre telling me that youre only supposed to strum the 2 notes of the power chord in an extremely small limited range of motion? Sorry, youre so wrong its scary. Thats why you mute out the other strings, so you can free up your range of motion and strum freely.

Edit: To clarify, if you are doing anything that involves all down strums such as a palm muted metal riff, then yes, you want to be string specific on the notes of the power chords. When using an actual multi directional strumming pattern, its necessary for the continuity of the rhythm to strum just like you would a "full" chord using 5 or 6 strings. Thus you need to mute out unwanted strings, and strum away.

If you can't hit the strings you want to sound, and not hit the ones you don't, then you're a pretty shitty excuse for a guitarist.

I can execute a full strummng stroke across the body of the guitar and still only hit the strings I want - octaves and suchlike obviously don't count as the muted string is between the ones you're hitting.
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#30
from another thread:

Quote by PogBoy
When your playing any group of notes, you should always be muting out all other strings youre not utilizing.


miyamoto musashi once said of swordsmanship -- "there is no such thing as a man-cutting grip." what this means is that when you cut something with a sword, you hold it as you always hold it -- you don't hold it one way and then change your grip when you actually make impact. the same principle is valid here. a good picking technique is able to deal with any and all situations. if you need (not want, NEED) to bring in different types of techniques to play something as simple as an upstroke, your technique is subpar and inefficient.
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#31
Quote by PogBoy
I challenge anyone to show me one video of a band playing power chords where when they are strumming they are not using a natural full range of motion and instead using tiny movements on 2 strings only. Go.

P.S. How do you rookies go about playing octaves without hitting the muted string in the middle since that would be "poor technique" right? :/


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HuMvbn37gs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

very first riff


But i guess youre too "pro" for common sense
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Blasphemy as severe as this is fucking unforgivable and by bullshito code you must commit sudoku for disgracing famirys honoru.
#32
I always play my powerchords w/ an octave - i never learned it any other way. Sure sometimes you accidentally strum the muted strings but if i remember correctly, i stated that it was proper technique not to strum it.

Now you requesting for a band that actually uses correct technique is kinda dumb because for e.g, Paul McCartney fingerpicks w/ 2 fingers. is that proper technique?
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
___________________________________________________
#34
Quote by PogBoy
You show me death metal trem picking and call it strumming...lol


3.46 and 5.48

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBtLMLQfiRo

You can see that they are strumming agressively in a small range of motion. Only hitting the fretted notes.

The 5.48one, you can clearly see that he is playing an E5 with just two notes and then can tell when he plays it with the octave
Last edited by mrbabo91 at Aug 29, 2011,