#1
Hello everybody, I've been playing around for a while with the Aminor pentatonic,and it's the only scale I know in full for now. However, I know that the Cmajor pentatonic would have the exact same notes as Am pentatonic, so how do I go about making my improvisation sound like C major? Whenever I do some soloing, I can't help but make it bluesy. I want to go from being entrenched in the Blues sound to going towards a more rock sound. How do I go about doing that?

Btw, this is my first time posting, though I have sometimes ended up looking at the archives for answers a few times before. I hope I'm posting in the right section...
#2
Quote by royisinabox
Hello everybody, I've been playing around for a while with the Aminor pentatonic,and it's the only scale I know in full for now. However, I know that the Cmajor pentatonic would have the exact same notes as Am pentatonic, so how do I go about making my improvisation sound like C major? Whenever I do some soloing, I can't help but make it bluesy. I want to go from being entrenched in the Blues sound to going towards a more rock sound. How do I go about doing that?

Btw, this is my first time posting, though I have sometimes ended up looking at the archives for answers a few times before. I hope I'm posting in the right section...



You'll want to have a backing track in the "Key" of C Major. The chords and resolutions, will make the attending improvisation, decidedly Major.

C Em Dm G would be an example of a progression that will work on an improvisation using a C Major Pentatonic scale.

Good luck, man! A Lot of people ave that same question when they first start out. Onward and Forward!

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by royisinabox
Hello everybody, I've been playing around for a while with the Aminor pentatonic,and it's the only scale I know in full for now. However, I know that the Cmajor pentatonic would have the exact same notes as Am pentatonic, so how do I go about making my improvisation sound like C major? Whenever I do some soloing, I can't help but make it bluesy. I want to go from being entrenched in the Blues sound to going towards a more rock sound. How do I go about doing that?


What are you playing over?

It may help to learn the notes in the "major" position, which will get you out of your default licks. But the simple truth is that the same notes will sound different played over a C major chord sequence than they will over an A minor chord sequence.

You can explore this on your own very easily - record a simple backing track of Am and Dm for sixteen bars, then switch to C and F for 16 bars, repeat a couple of times. Solo the exact same way - and notice how what you're doing seems to change as the chord structure beneath you changes.
#4
Yea it's the progression that will do most of the work, and I mean it will dictate how you solo too. So think more about the difference in the chord progression, whenever you solo you should be thinking about the progression your solo is built upon anyway to really control how it sounds.

when you're playing over an A minor chord for example, soloing around notes like A, C, and E is obviously a good start, and the simplest thing, i.e. then playing over a C major chord, would literally involve dropping the A note in your solo for a G note, and suddenly the dynamic has changed. You havent changed that much in terms of moving to an entirely new fret on the guitar, but it's the simple things that make a big difference, and the chords will guide you towards those little details

but yea, fair question, a good thing to focus on. the more you try things out, the quicker you'll get to grips with it. just have a crack at it and see how it sounds
#5
Quote by Sean0913
You'll want to have a backing track in the "Key" of C Major. The chords and resolutions, will make the attending improvisation, decidedly Major.

C Em Dm G would be an example of a progression that will work on an improvisation using a C Major Pentatonic scale.

Good luck, man! A Lot of people ave that same question when they first start out. Onward and Forward!

Best,

Sean


Good answer to your question here as what you're playing over is a huge factor into whether it sounds major, minor, bluesy or rocky etc