#1
Alright guys. Im having trouble trying to find flatwound strings at a gauge of 110, 90, 70, 50. I wanted to buy Chromes but they're too light, DR doesnt make my strings, and neither does Rotosound (this hit me the worst ). Any suggestions?

I think La Bella make them but they're damn expensive. Any feedback on La Bella's? Are they worth the $60? Any advice appreciated. Thanks.
pinga
#3
Quote by perszzac
try D'addario.


D'addario's only flatwound is the chrome, GHS and Ernie Ball have flatwounds but i doubt you'll find the gauge you are looking for
Last edited by rami80 at Aug 27, 2011,
#4
Quote by perszzac
try D'addario.

I said Chromes were too light.

Both EB and GHS are too light. GODDAMMIT WHY DO COMPANIES INSIST ON MAKING THE D OR THE A STRING TOO LIGHT OR TOO HEAVY.

it's always like 50 75 95 110 or 50 65 85 110

EDIT: The La Bella strings I was talking about is this:

http://www.juststrings.com/lab-760fm.html

not the exact gauge but damn near close enough. They're not as expensive as I thought apparently. Any feedback on these strings?
pinga
Last edited by Cb4rabid at Aug 27, 2011,
#5
Ive heard a lot of good things about La Bella. very few if any downsides to them. Give them a shot see what you think.
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
#6
Try TI's.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#7
Quote by dark Mass
Try TI's.

Too light unfortunately.

I guess i'm gonna go with La Bella. They're the closest to my gauge and not bad pricewise.
pinga
#8
I use La Bellas. Best stainless flatwounds I've ever tried. Had one instance of a G string breaking on restringing while trying to get it up to tune and was advised to call Labella. They mailed me not one, but two free replacement G strings that same day. Very good customer service.

The strings seem to be ground smoother than other brands as well.
#10
Does anybody know if these La Bellas are relatively bright? I would like a fair amount of brightness to the flats. I am not looking for a rubber band tone.
pinga
#11
Just FYI, JustStrings.com's price is $38.52 for the 760-FM set. Elderly's has them for $31, or two sets for $57.60. Elderly's also has free shipping for anything over $49, so the 2-set deal would apply. Don't know what the shipping cost would be on one set.

http://elderly.com/accessories/items/760FM.htm

As to brightness, I think they're almost perfectly balanced but that's my ears and opinion. I'm thinking you'll just have to try a set and see whether or not they suit you. They are most definitely not "rubber band" sounding. Here's an old TalkBass review of the 760Fm strings, albeit on a short scale (which is what I use).

http://www.talkbass.com/reviews/showproduct.php/product/1286/title/la-bella-deep-talkin-27-bass-strings-760fmflat-wound-2c-short-scale/cat/17
Last edited by VeloDog at Aug 28, 2011,
#12
Well if buying flats mean never having to change your strings, wouldn't buying two be....pointless?
pinga
#13
Not at all pointless if you have two basses. I have 3 basses with La Bellas on them so I buy 4 sets at a time so I have one spare set. I change them once a year. I assume by your comment that you only have one one bass to outfit with flats so your situation may be different.
#14
Oh, right. Yeah, unfortunately I only have one bass. I don't really need two sets, and im still wondering if flats are for me, but there's really only one way to find out. Any idea if they're bright?
pinga
#15
Rotosound offers Steve Harris signature flatwounds. Unfortunately the gauges are: 110, 95, 75, 50.
So if you have the chance you could try them out. I thought the sound was great, even when played with a pick. The bass I played was a Fender Jazz and it sounded fairly bright. Don't know if this helps but I hope you'll find what you're looking for.
Basses:
Ibanez ARTB-100 (white)
Fender Standard Jazz (black)
Amp:
Peavey MK VI
#16
They're not gonna be bright like roundwounds; flats are darker and thumpy. They're bright enough for classic rock and country though, which is what I play most. What you get for the tradeoff from roundwounds is massive bottom end.

The brightest flats I ever used were Fender 9050's, but the largest 9050's I know of are .045-.060-.080-.105. At $24.71 (from JustStrings.com) they're certainly affordable though. I thought they were too bright but they might be just what you're looking for, assuming you can live with the string size.
http://www.juststrings.com/fnd-9050cl.html

Below is a quote from that TalkBass review I referenced in the 11th post. I agree completely with the reviewer's assessment. But y'know, I personally like the sound and feel of La Bella strings. You might hate 'em, I dunno. Why not go to a music store and find a bass with flats on it to play and see if you like flats in general? If you find you like flats then I think you would like the La Bellas.


In terms of tone these are the definitely the best flat wounds I've tried (compared to D'Addario Chrome, Rotosound 77, Rotosound 88, D'Addario Ampeg scroll bass, and a few other unknowns). It's not dead or all fundamental, and it's not bright and defined while lacking some midrange warmth, it's just all there. There's big bottom, high end presence, and everything in between is seemingly ballooning - full, vibrant, musical, versatile. It even sounds like there's a chorus effect (2 strings at once) on the A and D strings, with strong fundamental AND octave.
#17
Quote by VeloDog
They're not gonna be bright like roundwounds; flats are darker and thumpy. They're bright enough for classic rock and country though, which is what I play most. What you get for the tradeoff from roundwounds is massive bottom end.

The brightest flats I ever used were Fender 9050's, but the largest 9050's I know of are .045-.060-.080-.105. At $24.71 (from JustStrings.com) they're certainly affordable though. I thought they were too bright but they might be just what you're looking for, assuming you can live with the string size.
http://www.juststrings.com/fnd-9050cl.html

Below is a quote from that TalkBass review I referenced in the 11th post. I agree completely with the reviewer's assessment. But y'know, I personally like the sound and feel of La Bella strings. You might hate 'em, I dunno. Why not go to a music store and find a bass with flats on it to play and see if you like flats in general? If you find you like flats then I think you would like the La Bellas.


In terms of tone these are the definitely the best flat wounds I've tried (compared to D'Addario Chrome, Rotosound 77, Rotosound 88, D'Addario Ampeg scroll bass, and a few other unknowns). It's not dead or all fundamental, and it's not bright and defined while lacking some midrange warmth, it's just all there. There's big bottom, high end presence, and everything in between is seemingly ballooning - full, vibrant, musical, versatile. It even sounds like there's a chorus effect (2 strings at once) on the A and D strings, with strong fundamental AND octave.

Thanks for your help. Unfortunately, that gauge is too light for me, i dont want to have to use a 105 E anymore.

I read some of the review and I heard the La Bella have a heavy tension on it which is very good. I hate loose strings and I play with high action on my bass. I already know pretty much how flats sound and feel like, I play flats regulary on the school bass and I also play upright bass, so this isn't foreign to me.

The only thing im unsure of now is the loss of harmonic content and loss of volume while playing two handed tapping. Otherwise, i'm sold on the idea of flats. Like I said earlier though, there's only one way to find out if they're for me. I might them this week, or soon. I have to decide of the tone is right for me or if I should stick with my precious Rotosound 66LE's.
pinga