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#2
"Wish You Were Here". "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is so very epic. That haunting riff...not too technical but it set the mood. But really it is too hard to pick just one.
#4
I know it's the default answer, but it's gotta be The Wall. Young Lust, Another Brick In The Wall pt. 2, The Thin Ice, Hey You, and of course Comfortably Numb. All have great Guitar Solos.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#5
I don't think I could pick a favorite
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#6
Even though my favorite Floyd album is Animals, I'd say David's best guitar work is either on Wish You Were Here or The Division Bell.

Actually, it's definitely The Division Bell, imo.
Just listen to Marooned, Coming Back to Life, High Hopes, etc.
Every track on the album has great guitar.

His solo albums also have awesome guitar work. I'd give them a listen if you're interested.
The song that pulled me into his self-titled at first was Raise My Rent, but most of his solo stuff is just great.
#8
Quote by Full Metal Funk
Dark Side of the Moon... cause Alan Parsons produced it.


Wrong sir. He engineered it. The band themselves produced it. There's a distinct difference.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#9
A slip of the ignorance on my part. Yes, he did engineer the album. But I believe it wouldn't have been the same without his part in it. He was the master of the sound effects on the album, to say the least.

I always thought the clinking, shredding of money in Money being out of sync with the music was on purpose. But I read it was a mistake on Parson's part. To me, it helped, along with the 7/8 timing, make that song the anthem it is.
#10
Allow me to be a jerk once more: Money is in 7/4 time.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#11
Quote by gquady09
Allow me to be a jerk once more: Money is in 7/4 time.


Then kick Songfacts in the balls. There's more than one site that has it as 7/8. Wiki, however, has it as 7/4, but that Waters AND Gilmour said (mistakingly) that it was 7/8. So I'm in good company.
#12
Quote by institutions
Actually, it's definitely The Division Bell, imo.
Just listen to Marooned, Coming Back to Life, High Hopes, etc.
Every track on the album has great guitar...
Pretty much. Aside from lyrically, though I would favor it there as well, Division Bell owns all previous Floyd albums in all categories pretty easily.

There has been few solos as brilliant, emotional and epic without even trying to be like Marooned.

There is a reason why that, after hundreds of songs, three decades of life, and landmarks in the music world before, Division Bell is the only Floyd album to feature a Grammy award winning song. I do not think Floyd was even nominated before their lone victory.

It basically goes without saying. If you are looking for the best anything when it comes to Floyd, you'd be best looking at Division Bell.
#13
Quote by AllJudasPriest
It basically goes without saying. If you are looking for the best anything when it comes to Floyd, you'd be best looking at Division Bell.


I disagree completely.

Leaving aside everything else and considering only David's playing, The Division Bell has never done very much for me. In the post-Waters Pink Floyd albums, I've always found David's playing to be very pretentious, repetitive, boring and forgettable. It sounds to me like somebody who keeps talking because they just love the sound of their own voice, instead of actually having something worth saying.

You mention Marooned, which in my opinion (and of course, this is all opinion) is probably the worst track on the album for the reasons I've mentioned.

I do like High Hopes, but whether or not you could call the solo a "guitar" solo is debateable, it's played on a lap steel.

I'm a huge fan of David's playing, but not in post-Waters Pink Floyd or solo (I find On An Island almost unlistenable). I feel that the best examples of David's playing would be on Wish You Were Here, The Wall and The Final Cut, all for different reasons.

On Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Pts 1-5), I find David's playing to be atmospheric and epic, but unlike Marooned where I feel he may have been going for a similar feeling, I think he sounds like he really has something to say on that track.

Have A Cigar is probably my favourite of David's solos. Absolutely stunning.

On The Wall and The Final Cut, well I just think David's playing is fabulous. The Wall has the obvious ones, Mother, Another Brick In The Wall Pt. 2, Comfortably Numb, Young Lust, etc, but David's solos on The Fletcher Memorial Home, The Final Cut and Not Now John have always been among my favourites.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#14
Quote by AllJudasPriest
Pretty much. Aside from lyrically, though I would favor it there as well, Division Bell owns all previous Floyd albums in all categories pretty easily.

There has been few solos as brilliant, emotional and epic without even trying to be like Marooned.

There is a reason why that, after hundreds of songs, three decades of life, and landmarks in the music world before, Division Bell is the only Floyd album to feature a Grammy award winning song. I do not think Floyd was even nominated before their lone victory.

It basically goes without saying. If you are looking for the best anything when it comes to Floyd, you'd be best looking at Division Bell.



too bad the grammies are shit and mean absolutely nothing. and with the exception of the guitar work, tdb is no where close to being as good as wywh and animals.
#15
Quote by AllJudasPriest
Pretty much. Aside from lyrically, though I would favor it there as well, Division Bell owns all previous Floyd albums in all categories pretty easily.

There has been few solos as brilliant, emotional and epic without even trying to be like Marooned.

There is a reason why that, after hundreds of songs, three decades of life, and landmarks in the music world before, Division Bell is the only Floyd album to feature a Grammy award winning song. I do not think Floyd was even nominated before their lone victory.

It basically goes without saying. If you are looking for the best anything when it comes to Floyd, you'd be best looking at Division Bell.


Division Bell is pretty horribly boring. Half of it sounds like softcore porn soundtrack for fuck's sake, how can you say it is the best of Floyd? Pre-Wall Floyd > Post-Wall Floyd. FACT
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#16
Quote by Prophet of Page
Leaving aside everything else and considering only David's playing, The Division Bell has never done very much for me. In the post-Waters Pink Floyd albums, I've always found David's playing to be very pretentious, repetitive, boring and forgettable.....It sounds to me like somebody who keeps talking because they just love the sound of their own voice, instead of actually having something worth saying.
Floyd has always been identified by Gilmour's guitar style. If you were to make a case about any other member deserving this distinction then it would be Richard Wright, but the least of which would be Roger Waters'.

Besides, most of The Wall & The Final Cut is of one person who keeps talking because they just love the sound of their own voice, instead of actually having something worth saying. Seriously, think about it. Pink Floyd, both individual members and collectively as a band, have always been a cut above at creating incredible compositions... of music. There were several poets from the era of Pink Floyd, but what Floyd had that those other musicians did not was their eclectic musicianship and ability to create such atmosphere and mood with their sound. Pink Floyd has ALWAYS placed a larger emphasis on the music then the lyrical content, with the exception of the end of the Waters era.

If you ask David what he thinks of Dark Side, he will repeatedly claim that he wished the music did not act as nothing but a vehicle to the lyrics. Lyrics should find a way to fit into the musical composition and if they cannot, not at all. But it should NEVER be the other way around.

With all due respect to Roger Waters' creative abilities, there are times of the Wall and The Final Cut, where I keep thinking, "Roger cant you just be quiet and let the band play? Do you recall Wish You Were Here, Umma Gumma or Meddle where the importance was on the music or the importance of the lyrics were on what you did NOT say?"

Yeah, the final two albums of the Waters' era was extremely pretentious, repetitive and that of a soap opera.
Quote by Prophet of Page
I do like High Hopes, but whether or not you could call the solo a "guitar" solo is debateable, it's played on a lap steel.
Um......A lap steel is a guitar too.
Quote by Prophet of Page
I'm a huge fan of David's playing, but not in post-Waters Pink Floyd or solo (I find On An Island almost unlistenable). I feel that the best examples of David's playing would be on Wish You Were Here, The Wall and The Final Cut, all for different reasons.
Wish You Were Here is definitely a contender, but the Wall and The Final Cut? The Wall is the most repetitive album in Floyd's history. There are like seven tracks on the album that feature the exact same rhythm pattern. In The Flesh(Both parts), Another Brick In The Wall(All Three Parts), Empty Spaces, Hey You. The repetitive and bland sections of The Final Cut course throughout that album.
Quote by Prophet of Page
On Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Pts 1-5), I find David's playing to be atmospheric and epic, but unlike Marooned where I feel he may have been going for a similar feeling, I think he sounds like he really has something to say on that track.
It is very hard to make a case against Shine On... in anyway.
Quote by Prophet of Page
Have A Cigar is probably my favourite of David's solos. Absolutely stunning.
Yet, but what about the atmosphere presented in Mudmen, Sorrow, Atom Heart Mother(Funky Dung Section), Fat Old Sun?
Quote by Prophet of Page
On The Wall and The Final Cut, well I just think David's playing is fabulous. The Wall has the obvious ones, Mother, Another Brick In The Wall Pt. 2, Comfortably Numb, Young Lust, etc, but David's solos on The Fletcher Memorial Home, The Final Cut and Not Now John have always been among my favourites.
Comfortably Numb is the only one from the Wall that really stands out and that is for one obvious reason. Fletcher Memorial Home is the same wa for the same one reason. Not Now John is saved only by how unparalled it is, not because it is necessarily up to the Floyd standards.
Quote by turncoat60%
too bad the grammies are shit and mean absolutely nothing.
I think most bands wojuld beg to differ. Sure, you do not enter an industry to have Grammy Awards on your wall eventually. But to claim that it is meaningless to have them is also incorrect. Sure, I'd much rather be in a band with no Grammy Awards but respect of my fans and peers, but I'd much rather be in a band with Grammy Awards AND the respect of my fans and peers.
Quote by turncoat60%
and with the exception of the guitar work, tdb is no where close to being as good as wywh and animals.
Well the point of this thread was about the guitar work, which is something you yourself claimed was good about TDB.
Quote by romencer17
Division Bell is pretty horribly boring. Half of it sounds like softcore porn soundtrack for fuck's sake, how can you say it is the best of Floyd? Pre-Wall Floyd > Post-Wall Floyd. FACT
If by boring you mean the slow pace, well, lots of Floyd albums have had slow paces. Aside from the second half of One of these days and one middle section of Echoes, the album is very slow, like Fearless, A Pillow Of Winds and Seamus. More was very slow aside from Nile Song and Lbiza Bar. Umma Gumma was very slow and features tracks with no music at all, like Several Species... Obscured By Clouds, with the exception of Free Four, is extremely slow paced. With the possible exception of Have A Cigar, which is also arguable, Wish You Were Here is another very slow album.

TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
TDB is, literally, no different then this
Last edited by AllJudasPriest at Aug 29, 2011,
#17
I don't mean slow. If I meant slow, I would have said slow. if I thought slow music was boring, I wouldn't listen to Pink Floyd. I don't think that way, but I do think that TDB is ridiculously boring. Are you seriously trying to say those songs you linked sound like these?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5Ain15tsxk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B201O63uqhk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmeKSU6JMHQ&feature=related

use your ears, mate.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
Last edited by romencer17 at Aug 29, 2011,
#18
That really depends on how you're defining the term David Gilmour.

I'd have to say Wish You Were Here, but that's a severely biased answer.
#19
Quote by romencer17
I don't mean slow. If I meant slow, I would have said slow. if I thought slow music was boring, I wouldn't listen to Pink Floyd. I don't think that way, but I do think that TDB is ridiculously boring. Are you seriously trying to say those songs you linked sound like these?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5Ain15tsxk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B201O63uqhk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmeKSU6JMHQ&feature=related

use your ears, mate.
Well, maybe you should have made clear what you meant by, softcore porn soundtrack, as most of the music geared towards sex is slower in pace or just slow in every way. So it was only natural for one to believe you meant slow.

However, sound like them? Actually they do. The technology available on TBD allows for more crystallized sonic textures, but the ideas presented are very similar.
#20
by 'softcore porno soundtrack' i meant that the music is substanceless and is easy listening background music without much more to it. Which is what most of TDB sounds like. But, if you truly believe TDB sounds like the songs you previously linked, this is a lost cause. We have too great a difference in opinion.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#21
Quote by romencer17
by 'softcore porno soundtrack' i meant that the music is substanceless and is easy listening background music without much more to it. Which is what most of TDB sounds like. But, if you truly believe TDB sounds like the songs you previously linked, this is a lost cause. We have too great a difference in opinion.
Why a lost cause? Surely, you could understand as a musician that idea is far more significant then sound.

Idea > Sound.

So go with that idea, which is what I was referring to.
#24
Quote by AllJudasPriest
Why a lost cause? Surely, you could understand as a musician that idea is far more significant then sound.

Idea > Sound.

So go with that idea, which is what I was referring to.


Like I said, our opinions differ too greatly. You think TDB is similar to previous floyd efforts. I think it pales greatly in comparison to all of them and is shallow, substance less and boring with almost no interesting concepts or ideas.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#25
Quote by romencer17
Like I said, our opinions differ too greatly. You think TDB is similar to previous floyd efforts. I think it pales greatly in comparison to all of them and is shallow, substance less and boring with almost no interesting concepts or ideas.
Okay, however, opinions aside. I can demonstrate how The Division Bell is similar to previous Floyd efforts, for instance:

If you begin with A Saucerful Of Secrets up to Dark Side, there is one idea that you will find courses through all of their work. The albums are identified by a band that placed a larger emphasis on the music then the vocals or lyrics. SOS and Meddle both featured an instrumental track. More featured no less then five instrumental tracks, Atom Heart Mother and Ummagumma featured two instrumental tracks, Obscured By Clouds featured four instrumental tracks. On those albums, the songs that were NOT instrumental ALWAYS featured lengthy passages where only music is being played.

For instance only three minutes of the twenty three minutes of Echoes duration feature vocals, coming after 2:36 of music and then 12:58 of music. In Shine On You Crazy Diamond we get 8:38 of music before vocals and then 6:56 of music before music, before concluding with another six minutes of music to conclude the piece.

Does that sound like a band that cares much about the lyrical input? Sure, to a certain extent and Floyd were one of the best at writing lyrics. So let us discuss that...

From Piper to Animals, Floyd were the best in the business at UNDEREXPLAINING their meanings, and this is something that most Floyd fans claim is great.

Floyd basically seemed to have this goal in mind: Give the listener the answer on what the premise we are talking about, but we will let them write out the plot.

This means it was not just random notes/images/words that could be one thing or another, but there WAS a correct answer as to the meaning of their lyrics. But the journey to the conclusion was left up to the listener.

For instance, take Animals. I have always thought that album was talking about the Dogs being the Government, Pigs were the Law Enforcement and Sheep were the average citizens. Now even if you reached a different conclusion, could you at least understand why I could reach this conclusion? It makes sense, but does that make me right? Of course not. You could reach an entirely different conclusion and be just as right and just as wrong as I am.

But what of the Wall or the Final Cut? Sure, you could claim that the albums meaning is subjective, but the meaning is not. The meaning of the Wall and Final Cut are not only quite clear, but so is the journey to it.

Floyd lost their ability to be lyrically under explained from The Wall to A Momentary Lapse Of Reason. But for the first time since Animals, The Division Bell was an album with both a clearly defined theme, yet subjective plot for you to reach the conclusion on in your own way.

The Division Bell was also the first album since WYWH that featured the band placing importance on the music side instead of the lyrics.
#26
Wait, so your argument is because Pink Floyd used to not place as much importance on lyrics as music on their classic albums and because they did so on TDB then they are similar? That's like saying "well they both had David Gilmour playing on them so they're really similar!"

I don't really get your point. I never said anything about focus on lyrics vs. music or anything like that, all I'm saying is that the classic Floyd albums were well done and well written. the compositions flowed perfectly and kept you interested and entranced. TDB is boring with nothing happening save Gilmour playing the same solo over and over again and some random out of place ideas, such as Keep Talking. Honestly, besides the quirky weird parts all I can recall from TDB is ambient keyboards and Gilmour playing the same leads in every song.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
Last edited by romencer17 at Aug 29, 2011,
#27
Quote by romencer17
Wait, so your argument is because Pink Floyd used to not place as much importance on lyrics as music on their classic albums and because they did so on TDB then they are similar? That's like saying "well they both had David Gilmour playing on them so they're really similar!"
What?

No, my statement was Pink Floyd did NOT place importance on lyrics on classic albums just like on The Division Bell that it is similar in approach and idea. And no, that is nothing like saying because both featured Gilmour that it would be similar.

As I demonstrated, TDB is very much like prior Floyd albums, lyrically and musically, and it does not feature Roger Waters.
Quote by romencer17
I don't really get your point. I never said anything about focus on lyrics vs. music or anything like that, all I'm saying is that the classic Floyd albums were well done and well written. the compositions flowed perfectly and kept you interested and entranced. TDB is boring with nothing happening save Gilmour playing the same solo over and over again and some random out of place ideas, such as Keep Talking. Honestly, besides the quirky weird parts all I can recall from TDB is ambient keyboards and Gilmour playing the same leads in every song.
You might be missing my point because you keep associating your point of view with sound when I am talking about idea or approach.

I don't think the compositions flowed perfectly and kept you interested and entranced. I found Seamus, for instance, to be boring as I did with Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast, but if you found either one to be interesting and entrancing, then fine.

I am talking about approach and idea. I've learned the entire Division Bell album and I hear every solo in the songs to be different then each other. I also heard the subtraction of the manic approach gone on the album.
Last edited by AllJudasPriest at Aug 29, 2011,
#28
i worded that a bit weird, i meant that you're saying they are similar compositionally because they both have the main focus of music instead of lyrics? that is really not enough of a similarity to make me consider TDB anywhere close to half a decent album.

you really didn't demonstrate anything. You talked about what made the classic PF albums so good and then just kinda wrapped it up like 'yeah and TDB is like that too so it's good'. That's not showing what makes TDB good...

ok, please define to me 'sound' and 'idea and approach'. Should those not be directly connected when it comes to music?
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
Last edited by romencer17 at Aug 29, 2011,
#29
Quote by romencer17
i worded that a bit weird, i meant that you're saying they are similar compositionally because they both have the main focus of music instead of lyrics? that is really not enough of a similarity to make me consider TDB anywhere close to half a decent album.
Just that would not be enough, your right, but I also stated about the lyrical subjectivity. I demonstrated on how the final two albums of the Waters' era and the first of the Gilmour era to be lyrically inept in comparison to the way they did things before.

Let me give you another example on what I mean by lyrical subjectivity. Roger Waters' openly stated that the Saucerful Of Secrets title track is talking about war.

The first four minutes(Something Else) are that of the preparation, the next three minutes(Syncopated Pandemonium) are that of the battle, the next one and half minutes(Storm Signal) are that of aftermath and the final three minutes and twenty-four seconds(Celestial Voices) are that of the mourning over the dead bodies.

Since we now know that the conclusion is that, we can reach that conclusion, with the help of the band, in our own unique way.
Quote by romencer17
you really didn't demonstrate anything. You talked about what made the classic PF albums so good and then just kinda wrapped it up like 'yeah and TDB is like that too so it's good'. That's not showing what makes TDB good...
On the contrary, I DID in fact demonstrate a component to The Division Bell that was absent on the three previous Floyd albums.

Look, the concept of "Good" is obviously dependent on the listener and if you think TBD is crap, then fine, I respect that. I really do. But if I were to say to you that the humans all feature six fingers on their right hand, you would laugh, roll your eyes and point out the flaw in my post. When I state that I demonstrated it, I did not allow a subjective point of view to be entered. I really do not like The Final Cut or The Wall, but if someone were to ask me if they were important albums, I would state yes.

As I demonstrated, TDB features all the key ingredients in place for a Classic Floyd album. If you do not like it, then that is fine, but to claim it does not feature them would be false. Not because I think it is, but because I demonstrated that it is.
Last edited by AllJudasPriest at Aug 29, 2011,
#30
Fair enough, I can agree that it was a return to form somewhat after the three albums that came before TDB. I still think the songwriting is lacking in substance and doesn't offer nearly as much stimulation and variation as a classic (pre-Wall) record does.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#31
Quote by romencer17
ok, please define to me 'sound' and 'idea and approach'. Should those not be directly connected when it comes to music?
Not really. Some ideas are going to make the sound of the composition drastically different then what was desired by the band.

Ideas are always much more timeless then sound. For instance, ever heard of a band called RPWL? They started out as a Floyd tribute band and while they have since gone on as original writers, they still contain a heavy Floyd influence. They are able to emulate the sound of Pink Floyd but are they able to bring the same ideas to the table of Floyd? No.

In case you have not heard of RPWL, listen to THIS and see if you can hear the influence?
#32
Quote by AllJudasPriest
Well the point of this thread was about the guitar work, which is something you yourself claimed was good about TDB.


Quote by AllJudasPriest
It basically goes without saying. If you are looking for the best anything when it comes to Floyd, you'd be best looking at Division Bell.



pretty sure best anything includes more than just guitar work... but i guess wywh, animals, the wall, dsotm, and meddle didnt win a grammy so they are obviously inferior.
Last edited by turncoat60% at Aug 30, 2011,
#33
I was going to close this but there's a pretty decent discussion going on here, so I'll let it continue. Unless turncoat60% wants to turn it into a shouting match.

I'm of the opinion that while The Division Bell was a bit of a return to form for the band and is a good album overall, it's just not in the same league as anything before The Final Cut.

I'm also disappointed that at Animals hasn't been mentioned for Gilmour's best guitar work. It's always seemed to me that that was the one album where the usually careful and precise style that he is known for was thrown out the window and he just cut loose a bit. Exhibit A: the last minute and 40 seconds or so of Pigs (Three Different Ones).
How to achieve Frank Zappa's guitar tone:
Quote by Thefallofman
Step 1: Buy a Gibson SG
Step 2: Insert Green Ringer, EQ, 3 dead squirrels and a microwave into said SG
Step 3: Plug in and freak the **** out.
#35
Quote by AllJudasPriest
Floyd has always been identified by Gilmour's guitar style. If you were to make a case about any other member deserving this distinction then it would be Richard Wright, but the least of which would be Roger Waters'.


I disagree. Roger wrote a very large portion of the music, which was in part arranged by Gilmour and Wright.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Besides, most of The Wall & The Final Cut is of one person who keeps talking because they just love the sound of their own voice, instead of actually having something worth saying.


I could not possibley disagree more. Nor for that matter, is Roger's contributions to those albums what I'm even discussing. I feel David's playing on those albums is fabulous and I feel that his playing on the post-Waters era Pink Floyd albums and his own solo albums is pretentious, repetitive and boring.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Seriously, think about it. Pink Floyd, both individual members and collectively as a band, have always been a cut above at creating incredible compositions... of music. There were several poets from the era of Pink Floyd, but what Floyd had that those other musicians did not was their eclectic musicianship and ability to create such atmosphere and mood with their sound.


There are plently of other progressive rock bands and musicians from the '70s that had all of that too. I'd argue that what Pink Floyd had that the others didn't was Roger Waters at the helm. The album concepts and stage shows were largely his work. It was him pushing the band to work in the studio and on the road that lead to the band achieving great things from The Dark Side of the Moon to The Wall. As the other members of the band became lazier and complacent, Roger took more and more control.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Pink Floyd has ALWAYS placed a larger emphasis on the music then the lyrical content, with the exception of the end of the Waters era.


I would say that in their most successful era (Dark Side of the Moon to The Wall), lyrical content was always at least as important as the musical content.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
If you ask David what he thinks of Dark Side, he will repeatedly claim that he wished the music did not act as nothing but a vehicle to the lyrics. Lyrics should find a way to fit into the musical composition and if they cannot, not at all. But it should NEVER be the other way around.


I don't accept that it should never be the other way around.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
With all due respect to Roger Waters' creative abilities, there are times of the Wall and The Final Cut, where I keep thinking, "Roger cant you just be quiet and let the band play?


You're certainly entitled to feel that way. But again, I wasn't discussing Roger's contributions to those albums. I was merely stating that in my opinion, David's playing on those albums is fabulous.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Do you recall Wish You Were Here, Umma Gumma or Meddle where the importance was on the music or the importance of the lyrics were on what you did NOT say?"


I don't like Umma Gumma very much, it sounds like the band hadn't quite hit their best form yet. I don't feel it's a particularly good example of their work either musically or lyrically. Meddle is a solid album, and very musical, but not among their best in my opinion. I also feel that lyrical content is a crucial element in what makes Wish You Were Here the album that it is.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Yeah, the final two albums of the Waters' era was extremely pretentious, repetitive and that of a soap opera.


Yet again, Waters' contributions to those albums were not what I was discussing. I was simply stating that in my opinion, David's playing on those albums is fabulous. I feel that the solos on those two albums are among his very best.

Quote by AllJudasPriest
Um......A lap steel is a guitar too.


I merely stated that whether the solo to High Hopes should be called a guitar solo could be debated. When discussing that song I've always referred to it as a "lap steel solo." I'd only agree that a lap steel solo is a guitar solo if a bass solo is also a guitar solo. I'd certainly that if some kid asked his parents for a guitar for Christmas and got a lap steel, he's likely be very disappointed.

Anyway, I'm going to go listen to Amused to Death (which, by that way, has some utterly stunning guitar playing on there).
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#36
Quote by institutions
Yes you are

Have a Cigar > Time


Hey hey Hey, hold on a second....

There is no "definitive Gilmour solo"

Each one of David Gilmour's solos express many different feelings, so they can not be rated, only contrasted to each other.

Here are my favorite David Gilmour solos!

Echoes

Time

SOYCD Parts 1-5

Money

One of These Days

"C. Numb"

Take of Breath (David Gilmour's On an Island album )

Hey You

Careful with that Axe Eugene

Sheep

Dogs

Pigs (Three Different Ones)

(I love the Animals album )



THE LIST GOES ON!
Gear:
Fender FSR Standard Stratocaster SSS (MIM Gilmour Black Strat) -
Agile AL-2000 CSB -
Fender Super Champ XD -
Homemade Talkbox -
THE BORG COLLECTIVE
Last edited by Joe-Floyd-lover at Aug 30, 2011,
#37
As much as I enjoy The Division Bell, I wouldn't argue that it is his best or difinitive guiltar work.

As many others already stated, I would probably go with the Wish You Were Here album.
If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear
#38
I love Cluster One. It's my favorite track from The Division Bell. While DSOTM and The Wall definitely have some absolute classic guitar work, I don't think it's possible to beat Wish You Were Here.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#39
I really like Gilmour's influence on 'The Division Bell' album. Love Marooned, Keep Talking, Coming Back to Life, Turning the Inside Out--the guitar work is great in all, imo.

I'd have to say if you took those songs, added Comfortably Numb, Sorrow, Fat Old Sun, On the Turning Away, and Mother, you'd have my *personal* ideal Floyd CD. Of course there'd be other CDs on this album
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I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#40
...Mother is by far my least favorite song on The Wall.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
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