#1
Hpefully playing a few gigs soon in some hard rock/metal clubs and was wondering if anyone knows how well these songs generally go down in a hard rock/metal club.

Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water
Metallica - Enter sandman
Ozzy - Crazy train
Iron Maiden - Hallowed be thy name
Iron Maiden - The trooper

The setlist will look like this

Orginal song
Smoke on the water
Enter Sandman
Original song
Original song
Crazy train
Original song
The trooper
Original song
Hallowed be thy name

60 minute set
#2
Well, they're just about the most generic and overplayed songs in hard rock/metal history, so yeah, they're pretty popular, but they aren't gonna blow anybody's minds either.
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#3
With solos?
If so, they would work. If not... it would be harder to pull off.
Idk, personally, I'd end with The Trooper, as it has a stronger ending
#4
Quote by mrbabo91
Hpefully playing a few gigs soon in some hard rock/metal clubs and was wondering if anyone knows how well these songs generally go down in a hard rock/metal club.

Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water
Metallica - Enter sandman
Ozzy - Crazy train
Iron Maiden - Hallowed be thy name
Iron Maiden - The trooper


I would scrap all but "crazy train" and "the trooper". Seek and destroy or Ride the Lightning, I think would be a better options for a Metallica song. And then there are some cool Deep Purple songs like, "Highway star" or "woman from tokyo" that aren't so generic. And then do 2 minutes to midnight or wrathchild as another Maiden song.


I personally think if you do covers you need to do something that is familiar, but isn't necessarily the song by the band that every cover band and kid in the world plays. Especially if you mixing your originals into the set.
#5
I would avoid hitting more than one huge, well-known cover.

Show a little depth. If you're going to cover some tracks, cover stuff that's a little deeper in the catalog. Have the message be, "Everybody knows Enter Sandman ... but here's a metallica song that's just as good which you probably aren't as familiar with."

The downside to playing really really well known, overplayed stuff is that you invariably suffer by comparison. This is particularly the case when you're not doing any sort of genre-switching with it (eg, nobody listens to The Gourds version of "Gin and Juice" and thinks they're a pale reflection of Snoop Dog). Playing less-well-known (but still good) stuff not only enhances your "cool" factor but gives you the chance to do it your way without everybody making an unfair comparison in their heads.

I don't know metal that well - it's not my genre - but even I know Smoke on the Water and Enter Sandman extremely well, and Crazy Train reasonably so. I assume every metal fan will know the two Iron Maiden songs, too (I'd generally avoid more than one cover by any one artist in your situation, too).

If you're more comfortable knowing some songs that everyone knows to help ground your show (often not a bad idea for a band just starting out) I'd encourage you to find a way to metal-ize a non-metal songs or two. That gives you the benefit of a familiar hook to help connect with the audience, but you're still creating your own thing and it won't feel so much like you're just retreading your idols.
#6
Some great advice here thanks.

We had the idea to metal-ize keep on loving you by reo speedwagon but ddint know if it woulld come off really cheesy.
#7
It depends entirely on the crowd. If crowd is full of teens/young adults youre gonna get "i can do it better" reaction, if there will be grown men who have had their fair share of metal youre going to get "its THAT song again" reaction...

other than that:

scrap smoke on the water and replace sandman with something else. My Friend of Misery or Harvester of Sorrow maybe? That would be refreshing, yet still familliar to hear

Crazy Train will do fine only if you play it with solo, otherwise substitute it with something like Gets Me Through or Believer


Maiden will do good, but are you sure you can pull off Hallowed be Thy Name vocaly?
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#8
Quote by hr113
It depends entirely on the crowd. If crowd is full of teens/young adults youre gonna get "i can do it better" reaction, if there will be grown men who have had their fair share of metal youre going to get "its THAT song again" reaction...

other than that:

scrap smoke on the water and replace sandman with something else. My Friend of Misery or Harvester of Sorrow maybe? That would be refreshing, yet still familliar to hear

Crazy Train will do fine only if you play it with solo, otherwise substitute it with something like Gets Me Through or Believer


Maiden will do good, but are you sure you can pull off Hallowed be Thy Name vocaly?


Our vocalist can sing it one octave lower.
Thinking about replacing enter sandman and smoke on the water with heaven and hell by black sabbath.
#10
Quote by Myshadow46_2
50/50 original and cover? I'd suggest that you make your mind up.


This. Keep it to two or three, if you have to do them at all. That said, do some lesser known songs. I would replace "Smoke on the Water" with "Fireball" and the Iron Maiden songs with something like "Die With Your Boots On" or "Wasted Years".
#11
Quote by mrbabo91
Some great advice here thanks.

We had the idea to metal-ize keep on loving you by reo speedwagon but ddint know if it woulld come off really cheesy.



hey man, if you can pull it off more power to you. Best covers I have ever heard were metal covers of "ride wit me" by Nelly, "One week" barenaked ladies, and "proud mary" CCR

And taking a song and completely redoing it, and redoing it well can make a lot a buzz for the band.