#1
So today I was listening to one of my favorite bands, Pendulum, and I suffered a big confidence blow. How am I supposed to get a grip on all these programs and synthesis stuff? Pendulum somehow gets these sick synth sounds, awesome basses, their effects, mixing...all that, just shows me how little I know how to do.

I'm aiming to get to a point where I can be confident using a DAW and all its plugins and operating a home studio. I've been reading alot about mixing, particularly Mixing Audio by Roey Itzhaki, and have been experimenting with Reaper alot, in addition to spending alot of time browsing these forums, but it seems the more I learn the more I realize I dont know...

I don't plan to go into music professionally but I want to be able to run my own home studio and maybe make a couple of my own albums eventually, down the line.

The problem is that I don't know where to start, it was overwhelming enough to begin using Reaper and MIDI (which I still dont fully grasp), now I have to get the hang of so many different plugins and programs...Kontakt, Kore, Guitar Rig, soft synths...what's an LFO, what does resonance have to do with that? why is there compression there? why is that limiter on that channel?

Anyone have any tips or help to get me on a path where I can learn how to master all this?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#3
My suggestion to you is to outline some simple projects for yourself, you shouldnt set the goal for something "like" Pendulum, but maybe a couple projects focused on one aspect of the piece.

There are plenty of tutorial videos on YouTube and other video tutorial websites that will guide you through how to use these programs with simple projects.

Just type in the program name and tutorial afterward to see what comes up. Pick some random tutorials that interest you and just follow them through - the more you learn, the easier everything else becomes and you start developing ideas of your own before you know it.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#4
Well likehe said you should get somme sort of college for that, there a lot to know. ( not only about equipement but about sound physics, frequencies , dbs all that stuff)

but I can answer one of your question for now.

An LFO is a Low Frequency Oscillator. There usualy at least one on a synth, it basicly does what it says. Creates a sort of low Frequency oscillation wich you can change the speed of , pattern, velocity ect. Its serve to creat the ''WOB'' in dubstep, but can also be used lightly to thickens a sound or to create an interesting pad Soound that kinda waves in time.

Hope that made sense.
#5
You don't need a college course to learn this stuff, that's ridiculous. Though it will probably help you greatly I managed to learn a great deal by myself. It's just like an instrument in that there's no real trick to grasping all of these concepts with ease, it's something that comes with practice. Just keep fiddling with things and making your own songs and you'll get the hang of it. Personally, I learned by just making songs and adding things that I wanted, and whenever there was something I wanted to add that I didn't know how to do, I would then look up how to do it.
#6
Quote by zeke8402
You don't need a college course to learn this stuff, that's ridiculous

You don't NEED to but from experience it's definatly very helpful in giving you a starting point and tasks to apply them too. I never said he NEEDED to do one. I taught myself as well but i found my Music Tech A Level to be a great oppertunity to try my skills and use studio equipment, etc.
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Aug 29, 2011,
#8
Quote by zeke8402
You don't need a college course to learn this stuff, that's ridiculous.



Not really rediculous, there are plenty of advantages that you aquire from learning at a college. For one, they are going to make you learn how to read music, and for two (the obvious one) if you finish your going to get some kind of degree of certification, which will help you immensely if your looking for a job doing this kind of thing.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#9
It sounds to me like you're trying to do way too much at once. Audio engineering is a skill that takes a while to master, just like the instruments you're recording. I found that I could get a decent sound with a little knowledge but to sound professional, it's my humble opinion that you'll either need to become a professional, or hire a professional. And, of course, becoming one won't happen overnight.

If you want some more specific things to work towards, you might want to dissect Pendulum's tricks and effects and figure out exactly how they do what they do, because otherwise, yeah. You're just fumbling in the dark grasping at whatever you can get hold of and not knowing what it's for.
#10
Quote by CarsonStevens
It sounds to me like you're trying to do way too much at once.
This was my first thought as well. you have to start simple and build on what you learn.
Quote by Vypor
My suggestion to you is to outline some simple projects for yourself, you shouldnt set the goal for something "like" Pendulum, but maybe a couple projects focused on one aspect of the piece.

this is great advice. i woudnt necessarily focus on an aspect of the piece myself, but on skill sets (my personal prefernce though). say you decide you are going to do one song where your focus is to get the lead and rhythm guitar to mix well. you lay down your tracks, get everything else sounding half decent (keep it simple to start, drums and bass and your guitars) and then spend way more time on doing that one task than everything else. find what works, what doesnt, and what has potential. next project you incorporate that, but then spend most of your time working with compressors (or even one particular compressor).

instead of trying to do everything, work on one thing at a time. then move to a new project, so you arent getting fatigued from listening to the same thing over and over. also gives you a chance to apply your new knowledge.
#11
Quote by jof1029
This was my first thought as well. you have to start simple and build on what you learn.

this is great advice. i woudnt necessarily focus on an aspect of the piece myself, but on skill sets (my personal preference though). say you decide you are going to do one song where your focus is to get the lead and rhythm guitar to mix well. you lay down your tracks, get everything else sounding half decent (keep it simple to start, drums and bass and your guitars) and then spend way more time on doing that one task than everything else. find what works, what doesnt, and what has potential. next project you incorporate that, but then spend most of your time working with compressors (or even one particular compressor).

instead of trying to do everything, work on one thing at a time. then move to a new project, so you arent getting fatigued from listening to the same thing over and over. also gives you a chance to apply your new knowledge.


I like that idea a lot, I think I'll give it a try, thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.