#1
over an A C E chord progression?
Quote by progdude93
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#4
depends on the resolution. i'd say A major seems most likely, accounting for the C and the G in the Cmaj chord.

learn theory. you need to start thinking in notes, not just scales.
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#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
depends on the resolution. i'd say A major seems most likely, accounting for the C and the G in the Cmaj chord.


Bam. If it is in fact A major, the C appears as a chromatic mediant, a pretty common trick.

Quote by AeolianWolf
learn theory. you need to start thinking in notes, not just scales.


I'd really like to emphasize this point--perhaps some sort of 'double-bam' is in order. This is the real lesson that you should be learning.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
learn theory. you need to start thinking in notes, not just scales.

TS, this will enable you to sound like you're playing through a progression rather than over it.

I highly recommend this approach and it'll make you sound a much more sophisticated player and improviser in the long run.

If there's one thing to learn about music theory, it's what notes make up a chord.

But that's not to say you shouldn't learn scales too.
Last edited by mdc at Aug 29, 2011,
#8
Quote by Jostry
over an A C E chord progression?


A minor pentatonic can sound good over that.
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by Jostry
over an A C E chord progression?


If these are Power chords, try A Minor - You have I bIII and V

If they are Major chords, Try A Pent Minor as well but be mindful if you use the C over the A Major, make it a flavor-note or passing tone and get to a more stable note, or even integrate the C to C# for a really cool tension-resolution idea over the A. The rest of it you can pretty much play as you like - The G# in the E chord can have a sweet passing-tone potential.

Good luck, these are just two ideas. The operative skill or point, is make sure you practice ideas and learn to determine what notes cause tension and what notes feel like they fit. The combination of tension (used skillfully) and resolution are the things that can make a lead or improv stand out (and are one of the hardest skill sets to unintentionally develop, and even if you TRY to, they take a LOT of work to skillfully develop intentionally)

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Sean0913
If these are Power chords, try A Minor - You have I bIII and V

If they are Major chords, Try A Pent Minor as well but be mindful if you use the C over the A Major, make it a flavor-note or passing tone and get to a more stable note, or even integrate the C to C# for a really cool tension-resolution idea over the A. The rest of it you can pretty much play as you like - The G# in the E chord can have a sweet passing-tone potential.

Good luck, these are just two ideas. The operative skill or point, is make sure you practice ideas and learn to determine what notes cause tension and what notes feel like they fit. The combination of tension (used skillfully) and resolution are the things that can make a lead or improv stand out (and are one of the hardest skill sets to unintentionally develop, and even if you TRY to, they take a LOT of work to skillfully develop intentionally)

Best,

Sean


assuming the chords are A C E (as in A Maj C Maj E Maj triads, or I bIII V)....


The C actually sounds fine over the A, I'd even consider it desirable in this context. it gives a #9 sound. Similarly, the G sounds as a #9 over the E chord.

The times that I can think of that I've encountered similar progressions have generally been in a blues influenced rock setting. Playing straight up minor pent is a pretty common approach. Nothing to avoid at all. Just listen and play!

if the TS meant power chords, then the same thing could be implied by playing minor pent.


Other options exist, but the 1 scale approach is pretty straightforward.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2011,
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
The C actually sounds fine over the A, I'd even consider it desirable in this context. it gives a #9 sound. Similarly, the G sounds as a #9 over the E chord.

The times that I can think of that I've encountered this progression have generally been in a blues influenced rock setting. Playing straight up minor pent is a pretty common approach. Nothing to avoid at all. Just listen and play!



Well it depends, I see the #9 idea as it being an B#, but the major 3rd right next to in it in the C# if you hold it in the same octave range, will sound like tension and want resolution. If you play that B# an octave higher, I could see it - but you sort of have to have the presence of mind to know how to "control" those notes. If I'm missing something in this answer, feel free to post a musical example showing the C and C#played concurrently over the A chord in the same octave range, and aurally demonstrate how that's "desirable".


Best,

Sean
#12
Quote by Sean0913
Well it depends, I see the #9 idea as it being an B#, but the major 3rd right next to in it in the C# if you hold it in the same octave range, will sound like tension and want resolution. If you play that B# an octave higher, I could see it - but you sort of have to have the presence of mind to know how to "control" those notes. If I'm missing something in this answer, feel free to post a musical example showing the C and C#played concurrently over the A chord in the same octave range, and aurally demonstrate how that's "desirable".


Best,

Sean


sure it'd be tense, but it'll still function as #9. it's just a matter if you want that grind or not.
shred is gaudy music
#13
Well then we are saying close to the same thing then, really, my suggestion is instead of using that "grind", would be to use it as a "flavor note" to resolve it and yet tweak the ear a bit - because the best music and most interesting is the skillful use of tension and resolution with a really profound sense of the sweet characteristic notes, that's why I really enjoy cat's like Robben Ford and Larry Carlton's lead work and improvisation over blues and jazz changes.

I think your take on making it a grind is equally valid, it just depends on what you are into.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Aug 29, 2011,
#14
Quote by Sean0913
Well then we are saying close to the same thing then, really, my suggestion is instead of that grind, to use it as a "flavor note" to resolve it and yet tweak the ear a bit - because the best music and most interesting is the skillful use of tension and resolution with a really profound sense of the sweet characteristic notes, that's why I really enjoy cat's like Robben Ford and Larry Carlton's lead work and improvisation over blues and jazz changes.

I think your take on making it a grind is equally valid, it just depends on what you are into.

Best,

Sean


yeah I dig both of those guys quite a bit and I don't disagree with your suggestion. I think it would sound fine. as far as whats the "best" music, I always feel that it's what you personally enjoy the most. Obviously that varies from person to person.
shred is gaudy music