#1
im looking to play different chords then the normal ones or basic ones. I dont know theory but im looking to take it next semester but for now i want to find some chords that sound good so i can solo over them for fun and pracitice. Any jazz type or blues ones but really anything that is going to challenge me. I play half-step down on the guitar, i normally play metal with some neo-classic stuff like versailles and power metal stuff.

Thank in advance for the help
#2
You mean different voicings or actually different, less common chords??
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#3
Both, differnet voicing for common chords and just different one that people dont normaly uses
#6
Learn some jazz standards. I recommend...

Autumn Leaves, Take Five, and Georgia on my Mind. They all have some very nice chords in them which will give you a good starting point.
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#8
Quote by Cryingstar987
im looking to play different chords then the normal ones or basic ones. I dont know theory but im looking to take it next semester but for now i want to find some chords that sound good so i can solo over them for fun and pracitice. Any jazz type or blues ones but really anything that is going to challenge me. I play half-step down on the guitar, i normally play metal with some neo-classic stuff like versailles and power metal stuff.

Thank in advance for the help

To experiment with inversions and voicings, you can do this. In this example I've chosen the 4 middle strings. But you should find the voicings on the other two string sets as well.

What I have done is take a root position chord, then played it with the 3rd in the bass, followed by the 5th and then the 7th.

Use these shapes as a template, and adjust the notes accordingly to accommodate the three remaining chord types, which are: m7, 7, m7b5.

I don't want to tab all the shapes out for you, as I think it's important for the person to find the notes/intervals themselves.

So this should give you plenty of home work. In total, you should be able to come up with 48 different voicings.

4 chord types, in 4 position, on 3 different string sets (as mentioned in the 1st para).
------------
-5-8-12-13
-4-5-9--12
-5-9-10-14
-3-7-10-14
------------


Edit: Apologies, I just noticed that you mentioned about not learning theory yet. So this stuff may be something for a later date.

Although having said that, once you've learned about chord construction, which is pretty basic stuff, you should be able figure out how the above works.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 11, 2011,
#9
No problem and thanks for the diagram and the info.
As for
Use these shapes as a template, and adjust the notes accordingly to accommodate the three remaining chord types, which are: m7, 7, m7b5


do i shift the whole chord up and down the fretboard or just individual fingers.
#10
Quote by Cryingstar987
No problem and thanks for the diagram and the info.
As for

do i shift the whole chord up and down the fretboard or just individual fingers.


Yes, you shift the whole chord. Here's Cm7 as an example.

------------
-4-8-11-13
-3-5-8--12
-5-8-10-13
-3-6-10-13
-----------


Unless your name's Allan Holdsworth, not many people would probably go for the 2nd voicing!
#12
Unless your name's Allan Holdsworth, not many people would probably go for the 2nd voicing!


Meh, there are more tricky chord voicings out there than a 1st inversion minor 7th chord on the middle four strings. I will grant you that that particular voicing isn't one that I'm the most comfortable with or prone to use though. But something closer to Holdsworth territory would be something like this: x09674. I'm actually more comfortable with something like that then the 1st inversion minor 7th on the middle strings. Or this one, which technically is even more of a stretch and is only possible for me to play because of how high up on the neck it is: x0 14 11 12 8.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Aug 30, 2011,
#13
Quote by Brainpolice2
something closer to Holdsworth territory would be something like this: x09674. I'm actually more comfortable with something like that then the 1st inversion minor 7th on the middle strings.

Ha, me too actually.
#14
Quote by Cryingstar987
im looking to play different chords then the normal ones or basic ones. I dont know theory but im looking to take it next semester but for now i want to find some chords that sound good so i can solo over them for fun and pracitice. Any jazz type or blues ones but really anything that is going to challenge me. I play half-step down on the guitar, i normally play metal with some neo-classic stuff like versailles and power metal stuff.

Thank in advance for the help


So how are you going to solo and make it sound good if I throw you a G7#5, or other altered dominant, if you don't know what you are doing? I'm not trying to be mean, I'm just saying that this seems to be a question that's asked in total ignorance of the relationships between chords and scales/notes.

What are you practicing if you dont know what you're doing, and how would not knowing anything be "fun" for you?

It just doesn't seem like you understand what you are asking to do, and its just going to open a wide hole for you.

Best,

Sean
#15
Just cause you know theory doesn't mean it's going to sound good if you play G7#5, or other altered dominant in a progression. There is that thing called using your ear and playing what sounds good.

What are you practicing if you dont know what you're doing, and how would not knowing anything be "fun" for you?


As for practice i'm using the different chord shapes for strumming, alternate picking, string skipping things like that. Playing guitar doesn't mean you practice thoery that's a whole other thing it's self and if guitar wasn't fun I wouldn't be playing.

It just doesn't seem like you understand what you are asking to do, and its just going to open a wide hole for you.


There are alot of guitarist out there that don't know thoery and are fine like Jeff Waters as he explain in this video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dnrf_ECBAsk&feature=related
#16
Quote by Cryingstar987
No problem and thanks for the diagram and the info.
As for

do i shift the whole chord up and down the fretboard or just individual fingers.


Just going back to the string sets. For the bottom 4 strings, it's not strictly the bottom 4. It's the E D G and B strings. So like this, a dom7 chord this time.

-------------
-3-6-8--12
-4-7-10-12
-3-5-9--12
-------------
-3-7-10-13


For the 3rd voicing, this is used a lot in fingerstyle and country. You can move the 3rd finger between the 10th fret E and A string for an alternating bass note.

As shown in this vid at 4:30

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaZJTB9ENLg
Last edited by mdc at Aug 31, 2011,
#17
Quote by Cryingstar987
No problem and thanks for the diagram and the info.
As for

do i shift the whole chord up and down the fretboard or just individual fingers.

Hopefully this answer will be more helpful.

1. If you want to stay in one position, but change the chord type then it's just the fingers.

2. For the chord type to remain the same, but different inversion, then that requires moving laterally on the neck.

Here's an example of point 1 above, for the 4 chord types with the 3rd in the bass, on the top 4 strings.: Fmaj7 - m7 - dom7 - m7b5.

-8-8-8-7
-6-6-6-6
-9-8-8-8
-7-6-7-6
------
------


The possibilities in developing good voice leading is endless. Check out Ben Monder. He is Mr Chord Man, no joke.