#1
I'm wondering how long or how many songs my band should have prepared for a set. We will have 7 original songs done soon, and we have a large covers list. If we were to go and get a gig, how many songs should we have prepared? I've been to a few gigs where setlists last between barely half an hour to almost an hour. Does it matter how long if we are in the beginning/middle/not end of a show when there are bands after us? My friend's band did 2 shows where they only played 3 originals and 4 covers.

Also, our drummer knows a guy who said if we can play a 3-4 hour setlist at his venue, he'd give us around $500 to split between the four of us. Any tips or songs that could help us get a long set?

We're a rock band that plays classic rock, modern rock,some punk and hardcore. Also this question works for my heavy metalcore band.
Quote by willT08
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How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
Last edited by thePTOD at Aug 30, 2011,
#2
Freebird or Achilles Last Stand could buy you some time.

When I played a show with my band, we were only allowed to have about 30 minute sets. We were the last band to go on.
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#3
Quote by thePTOD
Also, our drummer knows a guy who said if we can play a 3-4 hour setlist at his venue, he'd give us around $500 to split between the four of us. Any tips or songs that could help us get a long set?


The general rule is 12 songs per hour. So my pro tip for getting gigs that long is by learning 4 x 12 = 48 songs.

Otherwise I think you should try either figure out whether you're a covers or originals band, or perform originals under one name, covers under another. People who go to see original bands don't want continuous covers. People who see cover bands don't want to see originals, at all.
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#4
For a multiple hour set we'd be a covers band. We'd play some more fun shows like parties and stuff with mostly covers. When we play actual gigs trying to promote ourselves we'd play originals with a few covers thrown in there.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#5
^^^I'd suggest the possibility of having two separate band names if that's what your planning on doing.^^^

You really should do one or the other. People can get confused on what your going to do. You may have just done a a couple hour set at a bar doing covers, but then you advertise for another gig at a local music venue. What are people going to think your going to be playing for that second gig? The covers, which is why you want to differentiate yourself between the two.

I think that may be worded badly^^ but I hope you get what I'm saying.
#6
Quote by scguitarking927
^^^I'd suggest the possibility of having two separate band names if that's what your planning on doing.^^^

You really should do one or the other. People can get confused on what your going to do. You may have just done a a couple hour set at a bar doing covers, but then you advertise for another gig at a local music venue. What are people going to think your going to be playing for that second gig? The covers, which is why you want to differentiate yourself between the two.

I think that may be worded badly^^ but I hope you get what I'm saying.


Yeah I agree. For example in one of my bands we advertise ourselves as originals, but sometimes we'll get a gig at a coffee shop where we play half half. Now no doubt the venue owners love it, as does the audience. We made $200 in tips at one 2 hour gig.

However after on gig someone looked at the listing on the EP, then said they were disappointed that our cover of Summertime wasn't on it.

Ps. Although this may look like I'm being a hypocrite by even entertaining the half/half idea, I must stress that I'm in many bands, most of which I do not make the setlist decisions.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by thePTOD
I'm wondering how long or how many songs my band should have prepared for a set. We will have 7 original songs done soon, and we have a large covers list. If we were to go and get a gig, how many songs should we have prepared? I've been to a few gigs where setlists last between barely half an hour to almost an hour. Does it matter how long if we are in the beginning/middle/not end of a show when there are bands after us? My friend's band did 2 shows where they only played 3 originals and 4 covers.

Also, our drummer knows a guy who said if we can play a 3-4 hour setlist at his venue, he'd give us around $500 to split between the four of us. Any tips or songs that could help us get a long set?

We're a rock band that plays classic rock, modern rock,some punk and hardcore. Also this question works for my heavy metalcore band.


@ your original post because I didn't comment on anything in it lol

time your set list. At practice one day just run through everything you have, and use a stop watch or just look at the clock and see how long of a set list you have. Don't guestimate it. Because you could be playing a 2 hour show, and you finish all the songs and realize you have 15 minutes left...not something you want to do. And that way since you have it completely timed out, you'll know not to book shows going over the length of what you have.


And $500 is on the low side in my experience. I've gotten $800 for only a hour and a half. And I've gotten $1500 for a 3 hour show before...It's really situational to the venue, and how populated the place is going to be (obviously). And know what you guys are worth, don't sell yourselves short just for the sake of making just $500.

I've worked at bars before and they can make up to 20k on a good weekend night or promo night. They have the money to throw around to bring in some good entertainment for the evening.

Don't be afraid to negotiate. Even if you said you wanted $1000 and they came back with $650...that's still $150 more than what you would have gotten.
#8
Thanks. We will do that. One youth center that is a spot for bands gets stuff going a lot, but we should ask if they pay anything. My friends band played 7 songs there once for maybe 20ish people, and they each got 10 bucks. Granted tickets in were only 3 dollars but for big venues and long sets we will definitely negotiate. We're teenagers if that makes any difference. But if we can each make 150 bucks or so for one show, and have more than one gig a week, that'd be great.


And did you mean for say that 800 gig that your band made that, or just you did?
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#9
Quote by thePTOD
Thanks. We will do that. One youth center that is a spot for bands gets stuff going a lot, but we should ask if they pay anything. My friends band played 7 songs there once for maybe 20ish people, and they each got 10 bucks. Granted tickets in were only 3 dollars but for big venues and long sets we will definitely negotiate. We're teenagers if that makes any difference. But if we can each make 150 bucks or so for one show, and have more than one gig a week, that'd be great.


And did you mean for say that 800 gig that your band made that, or just you did?


That was what the band got. So $200 a piece. And just fyi every once and a while, (all venues are different) venues will want to "take out" money to pay the sound guy out of what the band is expose to get. Again things you have to know and negotiate, because you may be able to get out of the sounds guys pay coming from your cut, and they'll pay him separately.

Age is just a number man, it's all about how you present yourselves.
#10
Quote by thePTOD
Thanks. We will do that. One youth center that is a spot for bands gets stuff going a lot, but we should ask if they pay anything. My friends band played 7 songs there once for maybe 20ish people, and they each got 10 bucks. Granted tickets in were only 3 dollars but for big venues and long sets we will definitely negotiate. We're teenagers if that makes any difference. But if we can each make 150 bucks or so for one show, and have more than one gig a week, that'd be great.


And did you mean for say that 800 gig that your band made that, or just you did?


I don't think a youth center would pay those prices, they're a government organisation created to keep youths off the street, not primarily to enhance the arts community in an area.

In terms of prices I agree that $600 - $800 is definately on the low side for a cover band, in a pub. You should take into account however the hire of a PA or in circumstances where a band member owns a PA and that is used, the PA counts as an extra member of the band.

The reasoning is as such:

So lets say you have 4 people and a PA. You get $800.

If you hire a decent PA, that can cost you $200.

So you're down to $600 for the band.

Each member gets $150.

If a band member owns a PA:

$800/5 = $160

Each member gets $160. The person who owns the PA gets double share $360.


But for private gigs, we've been paid in excess of $2000. It's cool how much money people have spare for weddings/corporate functions etc.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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