#1
I was just reading an article warning against resting your wrist on your guitar while you play.... which is the exact way I play heheh.... is this bad???
#2
It's not really bad. If you can play with your hand resting then it's fine. Although if you're having difficulty playing certain things then I would recommend trying it with your hand off the body.
#3
It is called anchoring my friend. To each their own. There is no right or wrong when it comes to it.

Unless you're trying to play flamenco.... Then....
#4
Normally I just "anchor" on the bridge of my jackson. I've never had any problems with it.... but I don't wanna get used to this for many more years only to find out I NEED to learn the other way
#5
Anchoring with your wrist gives you a fixed pivot point to work with which is very beneficial and encourage picking from the wrist instead of the thumb. Because the wrist is anchored it is also imposibble for your picking notion to come from the elbow, this is good.

When people say that anchoring is bad they usually mean anchoring with the pink or ring finger.

You will see that 99% of pro's anchor the wrist
#6
Quote by mrbabo91
Anchoring with your wrist gives you a fixed pivot point to work with which is very beneficial and encourage picking from the wrist instead of the thumb. Because the wrist is anchored it is also imposibble for your picking notion to come from the elbow, this is good.

When people say that anchoring is bad they usually mean anchoring with the pink or ring finger.

You will see that 99% of pro's anchor the wrist


Thanks much
#8
I would severely advise against having your wrist touching the guitar, that is a hugely bad idea, I don't think I've ever seen anyone actually having their wrist touching the guitar. Resting your hand on the bridge is fine and can help with muting unwanted noise, resting your arm on the body of the guitar is fine and almost unavoidable, I wouldn't think anyone can have a fully floating arm without creating some tension.

Also +1 to Freepower, having any part of your body constantly fixed to a certain point on the instrument is bad, freedom of movement is gooooooooooooooood.
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#9
I encourage having the palm resting lightly on or by the bridge, it gives your hand stability and helps with muting. BUT! do not press down or just keep it in one place.

If you watch guitar players you will see their had resting on the bridge, and it will move along depending what strings they are playing on.

Go on youtube and check out some of your favourites.

WAIT! I just realised you said wrist! That I dont recommend. But take the advice I just gave to find a more appropriate and comfortable technique.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Aug 30, 2011,
#11
Quote by mrbabo91
Fix your forearm but not your wrist.


Nothing should be completely fixed, everything should be free to move, if we go by the wrist picking idea (which we should) then the elbow needs to be free in order to keep the hand/wrist at a neutral angle to the strings so that across the neck your picking motion remains as close to exactly the same as possible.

Really that's the ideal in everything we practice for: consistency.
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#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Nothing should be completely fixed, everything should be free to move, if we go by the wrist picking idea (which we should) then the elbow needs to be free in order to keep the hand/wrist at a neutral angle to the strings so that across the neck your picking motion remains as close to exactly the same as possible.

Really that's the ideal in everything we practice for: consistency.

This. You want to be free to move from the elbow downward. It's okay for your hand to touch the strings (to mute unwanted noise) but this point of contact shouldn't be static, e.g. as you change strings, the point of contact will change.
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#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I would severely advise against having your wrist touching the guitar, that is a hugely bad idea, I don't think I've ever seen anyone actually having their wrist touching the guitar. .


Paul Gilbert does
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

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#14
Well I've just been lookin' at it and its mostly my palm touching but part of the back of my wrist does touch the bridge. Never had a problem so far...
#16
When he's playing on the bottom neck he has his resting just like I do on the bridge. On the top neck he rested his wrist on the body of the guitar itself
#17
Quote by Zerox8610
When he's playing on the bottom neck he has his resting just like I do on the bridge. On the top neck he rested his wrist on the body of the guitar itself


His forearm is resting on the guitar, not his wrist. His hand is on the strings just after the bridge to keep unwanted noise to a minimum. His wrist may touch the guitar but it isn't resting on it; it, just the the rest of his arm, is completely free to move.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#18
I think we're just comprehending what I said originally differently haha. I might have chosen the wrong words to describe what I was thinking.

Anyway. Thank you all for your help.
#19
I've re-invented the way I play guitar and have been going steady for 5 months now using an entirely different technique than what I've used before. I've found that resting my wrist on the bridge has helped isolate the wrist muscles for alternate picking--to the extent that I now realize that my previous alternate picking technique (which I thought at the time was from the wrist) was a total inefficient flailing at the strings that superficially looked like it was coming from the wrist, but was actually a writhing combination of tensed arm, wrist, hand and finger muscles, lol.
#20
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


He did it in that video. Also in his instructional video, Guitar From Mars, he especifically said he uses his wrist for picking motion and rest his hand on the guitar as a pivot point.

Check out this video at 9 min:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLJ0WeZlHms&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL1EBBB61D2041F436
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

Gear:
Kramer Striker FR422SM
Roland Microcube
Digitech Bad Monkey
Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


MY VIDEOS
#21
Quote by El Cumanés
He did it in that video. Also in his instructional video, Guitar From Mars, he especifically said he uses his wrist for picking motion and rest his hand on the guitar as a pivot point.

Check out this video at 9 min:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLJ0WeZlHms&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL1EBBB61D2041F436


But his wrist isn't resting on the guitar, the motion comes from his wrist and his hand is on the bridge to both pivot and mute unwanted noise.

Frankly even if Paul did rest his wrist on the body of the guitar I wouldn't recommend it for everyone, Paul has unusually large hands that would allow him to do that more than a smaller person could.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#22
Quote by Zerox8610
Normally I just "anchor" on the bridge of my jackson. I've never had any problems with it.... but I don't wanna get used to this for many more years only to find out I NEED to learn the other way


That's fine as long as you don't want to play some jazz or so, where it's common to play close to the neck pickup. But the bridge on your guitar is probably low enough to allow for comfortable resting the hand on the guitar body in such situations. Not that I think you would ever play jazz on that Jackson