#2
I don't use a dremel often, but get a router base and they're a big help if you want to do inlay work (other than dots, of course).
#5
I would stay away from Draper. Their stuff is priced well and starts off ok but won't last long. You are better off getting a Dremel 300 - search eBay - either as a package (with accessories) or on its own and buy the bits you need.

As for buffing, I use these http://www.tonetechluthiersupplies.co.uk/Finishing-Supplies/767-Flexipad-Black-Foam/Detailed-product-flyer.html - they also do a compound pad too.
#7
Quote by SMTHSCN
could I actually buff the body with one of these, or would it only really get into the cut away on a strat and be useful there?
No, dremels aren't powerful to do big jobs like buffing or routing pickup cavities etc you need the proper tools for that.

Unless you have your heart set on a complex inlay, I would not buy a dremel over other more important tools.




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#10
Mine works for routing woods that aren't hard woods.
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Depends, I don't know what pickups go good with plywood. EMGs will make it sound like every other EMG guitar though.

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#11
Quote by SMTHSCN
Kemp: Are you using the buff wheel on the Dremel?



No, you want something like this http://www.tonetechluthiersupplies.co.uk/Finishing-Supplies/764-Flexipad-Polishing-Set/Detailed-product-flyer.html and a drill for buffing.

For general drilling, use a regular drill. For stuff like necks and bridge posts, you want a pillar drill. Silverline do cheap pillar drills - http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002QRYEBQ/ref=s9_simh_gw_p60_d0_g60_i2?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=19D757B7YMCAQY6ETGTG&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=467128533&pf_rd_i=468294 - not the highest quality but adequate for the hobby guitar builder.

It's also worth having a random orbital sander - if you use the edge of the sander's disc, you can sand away at smaller areas if you wanted to use this for relicing.

Then for your normal routing (pickups, neck pockets, trem cavities, etc) you want a decent router - eg. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-POF-1200-AE-Router/dp/B001E4EJ5S/ref=sr_1_2?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1314740489&sr=1-2

It does add up in cost, but a Dremel will not be adequate for those bigger jobs
Last edited by KempGuitars at Aug 30, 2011,
#12
im working on my 2nd and 3rd builds, and (hence my website) i look for any and every way i can to get things done because i dont have big tools.
That being said, i have 2 dremels, and the ONLY time ive used them really on building was with a ball end to make a countersink for the screws on my rear panel.
other than that i have found no use for them. they arent strong enough to really phase any of the woods being used. sanding wheels and cutting discs mostly just burn the wood.

a 3-4" hand belt sander has been my ultimate tool, ive used it more than anything. dremel, not so much. for inlays it might be nice, but thats about it
#13
if you want to do basic inlay, i would say a dremel would be fine. but if you want complex inlay, i would definitely recommend taking it to someone with a cnc machine.
#14
Quote by 00_hns_00
if you want to do basic inlay, i would say a dremel would be fine. but if you want complex inlay, i would definitely recommend taking it to someone with a cnc machine.


CNC's take very little skill...
You just have to know how to use a CAD and/or CAM program.

EDIT:
I've got the 20th anniversary(something like that) model of a Dremel. I don't use it too often.

If you want to drill holes you need either a Drill Press or an Electric Drill. Makita seems to be the most popular for Electric Drills and there's good reason for that. I like the cordless Makita drills. As long as you have two batteries you'll be good to go.
I think the Makita is around 200 dollars.
..I was watching my death.
Last edited by timbit2006 at Aug 31, 2011,
#15
thanks for all the tips!

I've bought the dremel as it will be a help with other hobby's I have (nerdy ones) and as for the pillar drill, that I will stave off for a while as I can just use the one at uni when I get back, and I will probably buy a router at some point.

I have the added benefit of a CNC and a Laser cutter at uni, so if I fancy a natural finish with a laser etched design, I can make it happen
#17
Quote by timbit2006
Pillar drill?
Is that what you call a drill press in Europe?



Pillar drill/drill press. Same thing, yes
#19
Quote by xadioriderx
oh geez.. why cant everyone speak normal english....
jk =p



it would help if all objects were given the same name universally
#20
Quote by xadioriderx
oh geez.. why cant everyone speak normal english....
jk =p


We speak normal English in England. I mean, we did create the language for our country - the key is in the name.

American English? Don't get me started...
#21
Quote by -MintSauce-
We speak normal English in England. I mean, we did create the language for our country - the key is in the name.

American English? Don't get me started...


nahh, here in 'merica we revamped your attempt at a language...


no but UG is interesting, ive been on car forums for years and years, and theres people all over the world on them, but UG has so many people from the UK and England, it completely doesnt matter, i just cant figure out why. is guitar just THAT popular there compared to here? or did it start as a UK site mostly and grow from there?
#22
Quote by xadioriderx
nahh, here in 'merica we revamped your attempt at a language...


no but UG is interesting, ive been on car forums for years and years, and theres people all over the world on them, but UG has so many people from the UK and England, it completely doesnt matter, i just cant figure out why. is guitar just THAT popular there compared to here? or did it start as a UK site mostly and grow from there?


You should keep going with the grammar. English is apparently one of the more pain-in-the-arse languages to learn, if it's not your native tongue. There seems to be so much stuff that's done for historical reasons, not because it adds value to the language.

I also can't answer that demographic mystery. I like how there doesn't seem to be proportional representation though - there are enough people of different nationalities milling around to never feel like it's dominated by any. There's a strong relationship between posting activity and timezone though, so perhaps you're just online when we are.
#23
I have definitely noticed the time-zone thing. It's nice to wake up and find more posts than when I went to bed.

In fact, I have good grammar when actually writing any kind of important document. English is my first language, with American Sign Language being my second, and only other fluent language.
I get lazy when I type online though, as most people do. My father was an English teacher for a long time, so it was something I constantly was corrected on growing up. In middle/high school, and college (6 years!) grammar and spelling were pet peeves of mine.
For some reason, when I am on a forum it doesn't bother me.

bettah grammah?

the only times im not online are 2-10am here. im generally online all day though, so i get a variety of time zones. but i do notice when it dies and all you other (or close to other) hemisphere-ers go to bed
#24
I would say guitar is pretty big over here, culture is steeped in lots of great british bands revolving around guitar, beatles, the who, pink floyd, led zep, black sabbath, iron maiden, genesis, dire straits, ELO & thin lizzy (although they're irish) all of whom drove the inspiration behind large amounts of popular music, not to mention modern populars like oasis (yeh, i know, disbanded) manic street preachers, muse, coldplay & stereophonics

also for a country smaller then some US states there are, off the top of my head, 8 big rock festivals a year.

There's a lot of influence in this country :p
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#25
Quote by GABarrie
I would say guitar is pretty big over here, culture is steeped in lots of great british bands revolving around guitar, beatles, the who, pink floyd, led zep, black sabbath, iron maiden, genesis, dire straits, ELO & thin lizzy (although they're irish) all of whom drove the inspiration behind large amounts of popular music, not to mention modern populars like oasis (yeh, i know, disbanded) manic street preachers, muse, coldplay & stereophonics

also for a country smaller then some US states there are, off the top of my head, 8 big rock festivals a year.

There's a lot of influence in this country :p


all those bands are from america.




i guess i wouldnt know much about the popularity of guitar there unless i had been there, even if a lot of music originated or was influenced there. i just know a lotttt of people play guitar (not well, but at least mess around on it) here.

but i wouldnt spend too much on a dremel for guitar building... they are handy tools for MANY other things though.
Last edited by xadioriderx at Sep 1, 2011,
#26
Genuine Dremels are awesome, but I only bought mine as a treat and because my old rotary tool wasn't exactly stable. My router has always seen more action than my rotary tool though, and an orbital sander is also invaluable.

Edit: Metal subculture is pretty huge here too. I'm always shocked when bands like Annihilator speak about being predominantly European bands, having had no luck cracking the USA.
Last edited by -MintSauce- at Sep 1, 2011,