#1
Hey, guys. So my problem is exactly the thread title. When I'm improvising solos, I'm usually off in terms of timing because I'm thinking of what I want to play. What are the best ways to improve this?

I do practice over backing tracks, but that might not help because I may be off even though I don't realize it.

This is something I've recorded where it's off in parts:

http://soundcloud.com/lyell/kendo-instrumental-ft-joe-son
#2
Always practice with a metronome. Start off slowly and gradually build up speed, making sure you're always perfectly in time and playing the correct notes. By the time you get to top speed, you won't have to think about every single note you play.
#3
You seem to be referring to playing an actual written solo in time. What I'm wondering is with improvising. Is practicing with metronome still the best in this case?

I kind of know that the answer is to play with a metronome (just kind of don't want to do it). I guess I want confirmation it will help before actually sitting down to do it. Thanks for the response tho.
#4
What part of the improvisation are you having trouble with keeping in time? Are you aiming certain notes for certain beats and missing or are you struggling keeping note divisions even during runs?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Quote by joehok1
I kind of know that the answer is to play with a metronome (just kind of don't want to do it).


There's absolutely no reason to not do it. It's basically a steady, even and infinite drum beat.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Backing tracks are good to keep you sane but a metronome will make you really experience the detail of your playing you can hear you mess up and bad timing better which you then naturally fix them.

If you want to tighten up practice strictly to a metronome for a while. You will also appreciate playing to a backing track when you go back to it.
#7
Quote by joehok1

I kind of know that the answer is to play with a metronome (just kind of don't want to do it). I guess I want confirmation it will help before actually sitting down to do it. Thanks for the response tho.


It will help.

Set it to half or a third of your tempo - so it's giving you infrequent feedback. That will help you develop your own sense of timing.
#8
Alright, thanks for the feedback guys. To answer a question like Zaphod's: could you guys give a listen to the soundcloud (fast forward to like halfway through)? This should help with what I'm referring to.

But anyways, a metronome seems to be the answer to my problems.
#9
Quote by joehok1
You seem to be referring to playing an actual written solo in time. What I'm wondering is with improvising. Is practicing with metronome still the best in this case?

I kind of know that the answer is to play with a metronome (just kind of don't want to do it). I guess I want confirmation it will help before actually sitting down to do it. Thanks for the response tho.

Oh right yeah I see what you mean. Well if you practice pre-written solos with a metronome it will improve your general sense of rhythm as well, so when you come to improvise you'll have less problems staying in time.