#1
Obviously the way we hear our voice when we sing/talk is different than recording it and listen back to it.

But is it just me when I cover my hears, usually I can listen to my voice the same way as if I've recorded it? I find it useful to have more control. Is it just me making this up or it really helps?
#2
I've never tried it, but if it works for you keep doing it!
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#3
I think it does, so I went one step further and started to use earplugs. Another thing you can do is hold your hands, palms facing your ears, to the sides of your mouth to direct the sound up to your ears. Or sing really close to a wall - be warned, this looks damn foolish if someone sees you doing it!
#4
I don't find it does. How can you know what you sound like when you're inhibiting part of your hearing? It's counter-active.

According to my teacher (I once asked her this question because my mother was curious) it doesn't really help you. You might do it a little in a choir situation (cup your hand by your ear or something) to pick your voice out easier but other than that she didn't see reason for it or how it could help.

In my experience it is hindering, I don't hear the resonance of my voice. While it is true it resounds differently in my head (to my own ears, not head resonance) than it does to those around me, there's this whole part of your voice you're missing when your ears are plugged. Your body is an instrument when you sing.. your nasal cavities etc are part of what helps create your sound and gives it body... you just miss hearing that FULLness of your voice if you sing with earplugs :/

Mind you, sometimes you HAVE to sing with them (or risk losing your hearing), but I don't find it helpful. Perhaps it is a matter of preference... but I prefer not to if I'm not doing metal music (and having to wear earplugs).
#5
Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden wears earplugs not to keep out the sound of all the instruments, but to hear himself singing so he doesn't strain as bad as he used to. DO IT.

Edit: I can sing somewhat like Kiske and all those power metal guys, but not for very long. How I wish I could... Good luck.
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Last edited by fretmaster13 at Sep 10, 2011,
#6
Quote by symba05
Obviously the way we hear our voice when we sing/talk is different than recording it and listen back to it.

But is it just me when I cover my hears, usually I can listen to my voice the same way as if I've recorded it? I find it useful to have more control. Is it just me making this up or it really helps?
The lower registers of our voices arrive at our ears via bone conduction as much or more so than via the air. Consequently, the ever present differential between what we sound like, and what we think we sound like.

I don't know about covering the ears, but cupping the ear to channel more acoustic energy to the ear helps quite a bit in hearing yourself closer to the way others do. I think Robin Gibb spent most of his adult life in that particular pose.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 10, 2011,
#7
Do you really say "hears" instead of 'ears'?
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#8
Quote by fretmaster13
Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden wears earplugs not to keep out the sound of all the instruments, but to hear himself singing so he doesn't strain as bad as he used to. DO IT.


Are you suggesting that he doesn't use foldbacks?

TS, what you are hearing is not the sound of your voice technically, it's the frequencies resonating the bones in your ear and head. Generally you'll find that when you listen to a recording of yourself you go "wow, do I really sound like that?". This is because usually you are hearing a combination of both the sound of your voice coming out of your mouth, and frequencies resonating your head.

If you want to know what others hear, which you should, the best way to do this is to actually record yourself. Obviously foldbacks are used on stage for this reason.
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#9
Ironically, I find that plugging one or both ears affects my ability to sing on pitch - even though I can hear myself better. And yes, I believe (but not entirely sure) that it has something to do with hearing only the vibrations in your head as opposed to the actual resonance of your voice.

I think the ideal solution is, if you can't hear yourself properly, is to have the band turn down so that you can hear yourself properly, or to get a stronger PA that will allow you to hear yourself better.

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#10
If it helps, I suggest wearing ear plugs so you can still put on a show and hear yourself good!
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#11
I'm seriously considering in-ear monitoring, but I don't know much about what it is exactly and how it works. Time for research!
#12
I think this does make sense, as long as you don't block out all of it. Making the channel by partially opening your hands would seem more similar to how other people hear you (You would usually hear parts of your voice reflected off objects, rather than directly).