Poll: What do you think?
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View poll results: What do you think?
7/4
2 22%
7/8
2 22%
Both
4 44%
Neither
1 11%
Voters: 9.
#2
pretty sure its in 7/4
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#3
the ones who are right are the ones who put "both", and here's why.

7/4 and 7/8 have absolutely NO difference outside of context, other than the basic unit of the beat. if you were composing a piece in 7/4 with a tempo of 100bpm (assuming the quarter note is the beat, since the 4 is the bottom number), it would sound exactly the same if written in 7/8 with a tempo of 100bpm (assuming the eighth note is the beat, since the 8 is the bottom number).

it all depends on the preference of the composer (or the transcriber).
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#4
I hear it as 7/4.

While they are interchangeable, generally people will try and tap their foot to the quarter note pulse - you could write that piece in 7/16, but I doubt anyone would ever feel it as if it was.
#5
Thanks guys.

I personally hear it as 7/4 too.

And 7/16... Imagine what it'd look like written down.
#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
7/4 and 7/8 have absolutely NO difference outside of context, other than the basic unit of the beat. [...]

it all depends on the preference of the composer (or the transcriber).


This. It generally becomes more evident which was intended when one changes from another time signature, but still, like a hermaphrodite, it can be both.
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#7
Quote by Freepower
I hear it as 7/4.

While they are interchangeable, generally people will try and tap their foot to the quarter note pulse - you could write that piece in 7/16, but I doubt anyone would ever feel it as if it was.


doesn't matter. i could easily write this in 7/16, and people would tap their foot the exact same way.

you make the assumption that the beat is always the quarter note, which is simply not true, regardless of tempo.

if i were to write it down, i'd probably choose 7/4 for the sake of convenience and the easiness of reading -- but it's uninformed to say that it intrinsically has to be in 7/4 over 7/8 or even 7/16.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
I'm not saying it's a cast iron rule, but it is a handy guideline. Time sigs may be equivalent, but just like enharmonics it's misleading to say they're the same thing but for notational convenience.
#9
The published sheet music says 6/8. Haven't listened to the song though.
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#10
Quote by Freepower
I'm not saying it's a cast iron rule, but it is a handy guideline. Time sigs may be equivalent, but just like enharmonics it's misleading to say they're the same thing but for notational convenience.


not quite. there are rules for dealing with enharmonics. time signatures are equivalent. most people would consider the quarter note to always be the beat, and thus put it in 7/4, but that's only because of a lack (or insufficiency) of musical education. bottom line is this: i could write this in 7/2, 7/4, 7/8, 7/16, 7/32, 7/64, 7/128, and so on. it's not like enharmonics -- if you come up with a G# in an Fm chord, you simply don't understand notes.

the only time 7/4, 7/8, and 7/16 have a clear difference is when they're both being used in the same piece. if starting in 7/4 and switching to 7/8 at the same tempo, the only difference is that the beat would then be twice as fast. likewise, i could do the reverse -- and the same thing applies to 7/16 or even 7/32.

if you're tapping your foot to it, you have no way of knowing what note denomination gets the beat until you or someone else writes it down in front of you. like i said -- the only reason you'd really have to write this in 7/4 (and by that logic, 7/8, 7/16, etc.) is for ease of reading. once you bring in other time signatures, then it makes a world of difference whether you use 7/4 or 7/8.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.