#1
I'm not entirely sure if this is the right thread, but I figure that the "building and customizing" thread would be full of people who may be able to help me out with this...

I have a classical guitar with 2 small problems.

1) There's a buzz on the 5th fret of the high E string. Just a slight buzz when the string's played and held down at 5th fret. It looks to me like the string is just touching the 6th fret-wire. How can this be fixed?

2) The intonation appears to be quite bad. Iftuned using a tuner, it sounds fine when played around frets 1-5, but sounds very off around 7 and above. How do I adjust this?


Thanks!
#2
Have you tried adjusting the truss rod? Look at the neck, is it too straight, or too bent? I have the same problems, but unfortunaly my neck is first bent "down", then up again, and I can't seem to fix it. I'f I'm not mistaken you should have about 2,5 - 3 mm space between the 6. string and the 12. fret. And if you press the 1. and 12. fret on the same string, you should have a tiny gap between the string and the 7. fret. If there is no gap, your neck is too straight.
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#3
Quote by wakytabaki
I'm not entirely sure if this is the right thread, but I figure that the "building and customizing" thread would be full of people who may be able to help me out with this...

I have a classical guitar with 2 small problems.

1) There's a buzz on the 5th fret of the high E string. Just a slight buzz when the string's played and held down at 5th fret. It looks to me like the string is just touching the 6th fret-wire. How can this be fixed?

2) The intonation appears to be quite bad. Iftuned using a tuner, it sounds fine when played around frets 1-5, but sounds very off around 7 and above. How do I adjust this?


Thanks!


When was the last time you changed your strings? Many of these problems can be resolved with a string change if the current set is ancient(greater than 6 months or so for classical nylon strings, a month or so for steel string).
Nylons last significantly longer than steels do, but still have a finite lifespan to them. Start there.
#4
Quote by Guodlca
Have you tried adjusting the truss rod? Look at the neck, is it too straight, or too bent? I have the same problems, but unfortunaly my neck is first bent "down", then up again, and I can't seem to fix it. I'f I'm not mistaken you should have about 2,5 - 3 mm space between the 6. string and the 12. fret. And if you press the 1. and 12. fret on the same string, you should have a tiny gap between the string and the 7. fret. If there is no gap, your neck is too straight.


It's a classical guitar. Many don't have an adjustable truss rod. You're also confusing action height with fretboard relief. A trussrod compensates for the pull of the strings on the neck and as I said, many classicals are not adjustable but fixed.
#5
I'm always overwhelmed with all the terms used like truss rod and such. My strings buzz so I might just take it in or change the strings like you said. Thanks.
#6
Different tension strings (hard, extra-hard, regular, etc) will give you varying degrees of intonation and/or buzzing problems, or cure them entirely. Even different brands of the same tension will have different intonation. It is a bit of a drawn-out process to find that one string type that seems to work perfectly with your guitar, but worn-out strings will definitely exaggerate intonation and buzzing issues. Just pick up a couple of different sets and try them out. Stick with the one you like best. If there are no other issues with your guitar itself, you should be able to find something that will work.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
Last edited by Vulcan at Aug 31, 2011,