#1
Hey there UG'ers. I'm going to be involved in my school's jazz ensemble despite having no background knowledge or experience with jazz. I would like to get some suggestions on good pieces of music to listen to in some of the MANY, MANY sub-genres of jazz. Thanks
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#2
Here's a couple of different types of Jazz. Just to get you started

Miles Davis - So What
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqNTltOGh5c&ob=av2n
Glen Miller - American Patrol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK-lBi5r6Jk
And on the slightly more experimental side. It might be hard to find stuff by them on youtube they're a bit obscure, but it is definitely worthwhile.
The Magic Hat Ensemble - Epistrophy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVSXrEAb128
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Last edited by Eweman at Aug 31, 2011,
#3
Al Di Meola is a good one I'd say. Allan Holdsworth, Frank Gambale, John Scofield. Though I learned most from Holdsworth and Al Di Meola. But there are many many good Jazz artists out there, I just named some jazz/fusion guitarplayers that I like.
#4
You can't go wrong with the Kind of Blue album.

Artists you might want to check out: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, John McLaughlin, Charles Mingus and Bill Evans to name a few.
#5
These are some of my favourites, and easy to get into imo:

John Coltrane:

- Giant Steps
- Coltrane's Sound
- A Love Supreme

Miles Davis:

- Kind of Blue
- Bitches Brew
- Miles in the Sky

Herbie Hancock:

- Maiden Voyage (amazing album)

Joe Henderson:

- Inner Urge

McCoy Tyner:

- The Real McCoy

If you're interested in getting into the fusion side, check out the Mahavishnu Orchestra, Return to Forever, or some of Herbie Hancock's 70s material. Once you have a few albums you like, a good way to explore the genre further is to research who played on which albums. In this case of the greats, like Miles Davis or Thelonious Monk, chances are their sidemen went on to become great band leaders.
#6
Get a hold of the Fallout 3 soundtrack, seriously. It's pretty much a beginner's guide to swing jazz, and is really way too good to miss out on.
#7
Damn... never really thought about Fallout 3 as a source of jazz listening, yet there it is...
That's a Bingo!!! Is that the way you say it? "Thats's a bingo?"

-Cols. Hans Landa AKA The Jew Hunter,
Inglourious Basterds
#8
I remember the first jazz I ever listened to was Pat Metheny's Still Life(talking). Just be aware that it also set my tastes in jazz forever.
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#9
Probably the greatest single compilation of jazz ever assembled is the box set for Ken Burns' Jazz documentary. It's also good because it goes in the progression of jazz's development, from the early days through big band through bop through contemporary, using some of the most important songs from the most important artists (although it does tend to focus on big band-era quantity-wise). That may be a better bet in the beginning than just trying to listen to singular artist CDs and trying to "get" them.

http://www.amazon.com/Ken-Burns-Jazz-Story-American/dp/B000050HVG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1316604527&sr=8-2
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Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 21, 2011,
#10
Quote by Dirk Gently
Probably the greatest single compilation of jazz ever assembled is the box set for Ken Burns' Jazz documentary. It's also good because it goes in the progression of jazz's development, from the early days through big band through bop through contemporary, using some of the most important songs from the most important artists (although it does tend to focus on big band-era quantity-wise). That may be a better bet in the beginning than just trying to listen to singular artist CDs and trying to "get" them.

http://www.amazon.com/Ken-Burns-Jazz-Story-American/dp/B000050HVG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1316604527&sr=8-2



A great cd with many remastered original recordings of jazz greats. Each cd features a different jazz era, so one can select a jazz genre to suit one's mood.