#1
I was playing my guitar and started playing a scale in this pattern:

A C D E G G# A

It's kind of like a blues scale, but the chromatics move up a string. Is this a certain scale? I think it sounds pretty good.
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You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

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#2
Its pretty close to an A harmonic minor except there is usually no G
it goes A B C D E F G# A

Edit: Come to think of it I think what you played is just simply a different version of the blues scale

Yep I'm sure of it now and you can still add the D# too
Last edited by killerkev321 at Aug 31, 2011,
#3
Quote by killerkev321
Its pretty close to an A harmonic minor except there is usually no G
it goes A B C D E F G# A


Hmm, I do know of harmonic minor, just couldn't tell with this. I thought it was like some inverted fourth blues scale or something odd.
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How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#4
It's called playing in a minor tonality. Both b7 and 7 frequently occur in minor keys.
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#5
G G# A don't all fit in one scale, so one of those is an accidental, by dropping G# you end up with a G major blues pentatonic.
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#6
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Hmm, I do know of harmonic minor, just couldn't tell with this. I thought it was like some inverted fourth blues scale or something odd.

Yeah sounds like a blues scale I wouldn't know the exact name of it though
#7
In minor tonalities you generally don't stick to one scale: it's accepted (and expected) that you will use elements of natural, harmonic and melodic minor.

If you want to get real technical, we'd need to know some context to determine which G is the accidental in a particular situation; however, I tell you it doesn't matter. He is just implementing a combination of two minor scales.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#8
It isn't really a scale in any musical context in which you're likely to see this. If you look, it has all the notes of A minor pentatonic, and you're just adding G# as a chromatic passing tone. If you used D# as a chromatic passing tone, you'd get "the blues scale". You could also use C# as a chromatic passing tone. But if you see me doing something like this, I'm really thinking in terms of pentatonic and just using chromaticism - I don't think of them as special scales.

Here's a cool descending line for you (cool to me because it uses groups of 5 and chromaticism):

|-5-----------------------------------------
|---5--------5------------------------------
|-----7-6-5---5--------5-------------------
|-----------------7-6-5---5-----------------
|------------------------------7-6-5---------
|--------------------------------------8-5----

Am I using a special scale with the notes A, C, C#, D, D#, E G, G#? No, I'm just getting chromatic with my pentatonics.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Aug 31, 2011,
#9
Quote by soviet_ska
In minor tonalities you generally don't stick to one scale: it's accepted (and expected) that you will use elements of natural, harmonic and melodic minor.

If you want to get real technical, we'd need to know some context to determine which G is the accidental in a particular situation; however, I tell you it doesn't matter. He is just implementing a combination of two minor scales.


When I play I almost always mix my minor forms together to make something really interesting. This particular scale I'm not sure on; I have yet to actually use it. If I had to choose off off the top of my head now, I would say that the G# is the accidental, therefore really just making it a minor pentatonic. I had earlier been playing with my mates and using an Em blues scale, and for some reason I just decided to switch the 3 chromatic notes from instead of starting on the fourth to starting on the seventh.

I guess it's just a minor mix.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#10
Quote by soviet_ska
\
If you want to get real technical, we'd need to know some context to determine which G is the accidental in a particular situation; however, I tell you it doesn't matter. He is just implementing a combination of two minor scales.



Ya I know, but he asked for a scale, and I didn't feel like asking him for a tab, so I just blurbed out the blues because he said it sounded like blues.

Besides, figuring out a scale isn't that difficult and I'm sure that if he had thought it through before coming here he would have found some way to organize his collection of notes.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
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Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#11
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When I play I almost always mix my minor forms together to make something really interesting. This particular scale I'm not sure on; I have yet to actually use it. If I had to choose off off the top of my head now, I would say that the G# is the accidental, therefore really just making it a minor pentatonic. I had earlier been playing with my mates and using an Em blues scale, and for some reason I just decided to switch the 3 chromatic notes from instead of starting on the fourth to starting on the seventh.

I guess it's just a minor mix.


Either G or G# could be the 'accidental' in different contexts.

If you want more information about minor keys and the mixture of the three scales, I wrote this article about a month ago:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1468006&

Hope it will help you.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#12
My attitude at this point is that if you see something being presented as an exotic scale that looks like the shell of an already existing scale with chromatic notes filling the spaces, it's probably just that - chromaticism mistakenly extrapolated from its context as if it constituted a scale in its own right, when it really isn't a scale.

I think that this also applies to what some people call "bebop scales", which really are just already existing modes with a chromatic passing tone added to them. I highly doubt that the people who originally played bebop were thinking of them as special scales.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Aug 31, 2011,