#1
I'm tuned down to C/C# and I've just restrung my guitar with some heavier gauge strings so naturally I needed to check out and adjust the intonation.

The problem is I've adjusted it on my tom bridge but the (excuse my lack of guitar anatomy) little bars that move up and down according to how you tighten the screws for the intonation have reached their 'limit' and can't go much further yet when checking the intonation with my tuner it says that the intonation is just slightly flat on each string but that's enough to make a difference I suppose. How do I go about getting the intonation slightly sharper?
Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

- Berthold Auerbach


Quote by jbridge90
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#2
Try and play some familiar chords up around 12th fret and see if it sounds false. Sometimes really minor intonation problems can be left in.
There is a possibility of filing the bars to the desired shape but it depends on an actual bridge. Can you bring pics?
#3
I can tell the intonation is slightly off, I thought it was playable but I notice it all the time now. I'll take a few in a mo
Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

- Berthold Auerbach


Quote by jbridge90
Wow, being surrounded by all of these humourless, pussy-whipped virgins is starting to make me sick.

Check out my band!
#4
this happened to me once. I loosed the strings and took them off the saddles (those are the bars you were talking about). I moved the saddles completely to the opposite site where they were and then I tightened the strings again and tuned. Then I moved the saddles again until the intonation was perfect.

Worked for me,

Good luck mate
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#5
Flipping the bridge around can help with this. The saddles' wedge shape lets them go flat against the wall of the bridge on one end but not the other.
#6
Quote by SupahStrat
this happened to me once. I loosed the strings and took them off the saddles (those are the bars you were talking about). I moved the saddles completely to the opposite site where they were and then I tightened the strings again and tuned. Then I moved the saddles again until the intonation was perfect.

Worked for me,

Good luck mate


Quote by Roc8995
Flipping the bridge around can help with this. The saddles' wedge shape lets them go flat against the wall of the bridge on one end but not the other.


I hate to sound clueless but I don't understand how this works?

If I took the bridge out so the saddles (cheers ) were now at the opposite end wouldn't that just flatten the intonation right back? Even if I tighten them up after swapping would that make a difference or would it be the same?

I can see what you guys are saying but I'm vague on how it would work exactly?
Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

- Berthold Auerbach


Quote by jbridge90
Wow, being surrounded by all of these humourless, pussy-whipped virgins is starting to make me sick.

Check out my band!
#7
You'd have to re-intonate after flipping the bridge. The idea is that the bridge might have more room for adjustment in one direction than in the other, so after flipping it you have more room to move the direction you want. It doesn't always work, since the chances are 50/50 that it was in the most adjustable position the first time, but it's worth a try.
#8
Okay, makes sense. I'll try it tomorrow and I'll report back.
Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

- Berthold Auerbach


Quote by jbridge90
Wow, being surrounded by all of these humourless, pussy-whipped virgins is starting to make me sick.

Check out my band!