#1
If i was to play in the key of say E minor over these chords Eminor, G major, Aminor, C major. How would my note selection change as the chords change. for example,Would i try to land on a G as the chord changes to G? Would i resolve back to E while over c major before the E comes back up?

After spending a lot of time studying bands like iron maiden and metallica it seems that they don't really hit particular notes over certain chords, instead they just make sure they are in key and play anything.

I heard marty friedman talk about soling over changes but the video wasn't too clear. I also know that soloing over changes is massive in jazz fusion.

I would love to learn how to solo over different chords of a key so if anyone has any advice, information, websites etc. Please give me a little bit of guidance.
#2
IF you are in a normal minor/major progression you just have to make sure that you play in key.
It makes no sense to shift around scales. Amin en Cmaj consist out of the A,B,C,D,E,F and G notes and the Em and Gmaj out of E,F#,G,A,B,C and D. So you can see that by switching from the Amin to the E min that the F would clash.

However if you want to change the mood of the song and are playing in vamps or chord sequences I suggest you use the modes. It's al to much to explain here but check this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hx0kMrBniCg&feature=relmfu
#3
Would i be right in saying
?

If i play over a Em G Am C progression in the key of e minor. I could use A dorian over the a minor chord and it wouldnt sound out of key. Because A is the 4th chord of E minor, which is the same as the 2nd of g major and the 2nd mode of the major scale is dorian.
#4
After spending a lot of time studying bands like iron maiden and metallica it seems that they don't really hit particular notes over certain chords, instead they just make sure they are in key and play anything.


They will do with their more melodic solos as hitting the right notes over each chord is what helps give melody and make a the solo "fit" the backing.
Mostly aim to center around the chord tones of each chord...for example over an Eminor chord you can emphasise E, B and G. Of course, you don't have to always play like this and over power chord progessions it doesn't matter as much as there is no 3rd to cause as much conflict, even though it can be suggested.

There is a lot to this topic and I couldn't hope to give you a full explanation, I would reccomend googling your thread title or looking around the lessons here on UG. Hope I shed some light on it for you though.
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#5
Quote by mrbabo91
How would my note selection change as the chords change. for example,Would i try to land on a G as the chord changes to G?

Landing on the root or 5th of each chord is fine, but it's more interesting to land on either the 3rd or 7th as these give the chord it's defining character. Doing this is very effective, especially if there is a non-diatonic chord in a progression.

Would i resolve back to E while over c major before the E comes back up?

Yes, you can do this to create tension and anticipation for the chord that follows. If you want to hear a player who knows exactly when and how to do this, check out Larry Carlton.

I also know that soloing over changes is massive in jazz fusion.

Absolutely.

I would love to learn how to solo over different chords of a key so if anyone has any advice, information, websites etc. Please give me a little bit of guidance.

When you listen to an accomplished improviser, you can hear the chord changes being spelled out in their solos. If you took the backing track away and just heard the soloing instrument, it'd be very easy to hear where the changes are.
Last edited by mdc at Sep 1, 2011,
#6
Quote by mrbabo91
Would i be right in saying
?

If i play over a Em G Am C progression in the key of e minor. I could use A dorian over the a minor chord and it wouldnt sound out of key. Because A is the 4th chord of E minor, which is the same as the 2nd of g major and the 2nd mode of the major scale is dorian.


No. You can think what you like but if you're playing over a progression in E minor then you're playing E minor and maybe adding in accidentals if you go out of key. It doesn't matter what it looks like to you, if your backing resolves to a certain key centre then that's what you're playing in.

Friedman's approach is much more arpeggio based than most people's, what he does is use the basic arpeggios of the chords he's playing over and adds in other tones to give him more options and different sounds depending on what he's going for. That, almost jazzy, attitude and his insanely weird phrasing is what makes him so unique in metal really.

Leads me on neatly to the next point: soloing over changes is really something that matters when you're dealing with non-diatonic progressions where you have to be aware of the harmonic character of each chord and change what you play accordingly for either tension or release depending on what you want to sound like. It's a massively difficult thing to do if you're not used to thinking that way and it requires a damn good ear and probably a lot of theory; you can do it with just a good ear but that's the longer, harder way of doing things.

This is really more of a Musician Talk question than a technique question as well.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Sep 1, 2011,