#1
|-0--4--0--9--9--- |
|-0--4--0--7--9---|
|-8--4--9--8--9---|
|-9--6--9--6--11-|
|-7--7--7--x--11--|
|-5--4--0--x--9---|

After the Db minor chord I alternate it with D major and when the D major is played I make sure a D note is played over it. Sounds a little weird, but it creates nice tension. Then the last two chords:

|-7--7|
|-7--7|
|-9--8|
|-9--9|
|-9--9|
|-7--7|

Then it goes back to the A chord. I'm not sure what these chords are, but I used Lydian mode to come up with them except for the D major chord which sounds pretty out there. The basic chords I know. The majors and minors I used I know, but I don't know the weird ones, or if they're even named chords. I just need it analyzed I guess.

I initially wrote it with lydian in mind, and i added the weird stuff at the end later
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
Last edited by fretmaster13 at Sep 1, 2011,
#3
Thanks man. I quit for 5 years and started playing again 3 months ago. Started learning how to pick heavily and put stuff together. Still not there yet. If you set your mind to something you can do anything you want.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
#4
The first chord is an Emaj7 (11) With the 11 (A) In the bass. So 5th Inversion.

Then Emaj7 with the 3rd (G#) In the bass.

Then an E with no 3rd, basically a giant power chord.

Then a G#7sus4, in 1st inversion, which is the dominant chord of...

C#/Db minor. the D major chord is a passing chord that functions as a b7 of E, however, you have it resolve to Bsus4, which can be reinterpreted as an E chord with an added 2, and then finally resolves to B Major. Whew.

As for if it works, does it sound good to you? Then yes. It works.
#5
Thanks a lot for that. If I want to write modal I have a lot of work then. Basically I tried to wing it and simply make up chords from the notes of the A lydian mode. Didn't work out exactly as I had intended. But that's okay, it's a journey. The A lydian mode notes sound pretty good over all the chords with the exception of the D major chord, which I had intended, but I did notice it didn't seem to resolve well to the "A" chord I used, which is actually Emaj7 now. Where do you think this resolves?

Edit: Wait, so the progression resolves to B major. Hmmmm
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
Last edited by fretmaster13 at Sep 1, 2011,
#6
Well A Lydian contains all the notes as E Major.

I've played around with the progression a bit and that first chord could also be reinterpreted as an A Major chord with a 9 (B) and #11 (D#). That sharp eleven is the leading tone of E, which is why those first two chords sound awesome.

So if we look at this first chord like an Aadd9(#11) (a very jazzy chord), Your progression does resolve. Interestingly enough, the D major you play after the C#minor chord pulls strongly toward A major. However, you have it going to a B instead. Which is fine, because B is a secondary dominant. (dominant of E, which is the dominant of A).

Edit: So what is happening is that you have tonicized the chord E major, but the tonality here is still A Lydian.
Last edited by Jet Penguin at Sep 1, 2011,
#7
This gets very confusing haha. Took a few re-reads. I don't know how you know this stuff. Thanks a lot!
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
#8
Oh no problem man. I know loads of theory (jazz major lol), so if anythings still fuzzy, or you need help with any more theory type questions, don't hesitate to ask lol.
#9
I don't have much to add, just a few nitpicks:

The first chord seems like Asus2add#11 to me (not major).

G#7sus4 isn't technically functioning as the dominant chord for C#m because it lacks the tritone that should be formed between the major third and minor seventh obviously because it's a suspended chord (no third).

EDIT: Disregard that dominant thing. It's obviously the dominant, but the tension it creates could be greater. That's just stupid of me, nevermind.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
Last edited by Flibo at Sep 1, 2011,
#10
Thanks a lot. I sure will. I can usually make music and understand how it sounds. That's where I'm best. Just don't fully comprehend all these weird chords and how they're written out. :p

This is probably the craziest chord progression I've ever written. I tend to stick with the classical sound. But if a weird chord I come up with sounds good I just try to find out the next chord in line that would sounds good with it.

Oh, btw Flibo, I've been meaning to tell you that that chord in your sig is absolutely beautiful. If I ever audition for a band, that's all I'm playing the whole time for it.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
Last edited by fretmaster13 at Sep 1, 2011,
#11
In response to what Flibo said:

Although the Asus chord does not possess a third, and is not technically major nor minor, it functions like a major chord due to the tonality of the piece (A Lydian), and its relationships to the other chords. So it is a sus and not an add9, but the chord can still be called "major" for all intents and purposes.

Think of it like power chords in a rock song. None of them are major nor minor, yet they often sound as if they are due to the tonality of the piece.
Last edited by Jet Penguin at Sep 1, 2011,
#12
Yeah, implied notes in the harmony or something right? I seem to remember something like "implied notes" from high school music theory. That e power chord started off as an E major cord, but I added more open notes to make it sound more "clear" like the other chords since playing a chord so high on the neck makes the notes sound a little dead. But it's implied that it's an E major.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
#13
Exactly.

Although these notes are not played, our ears are expecting a major chord due to the other chords presented, and so it sounds "major."
#14
True musicianship right there. Interestingly, I have a cousin who lives around the Boston area who plays Paganini stuff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDWAWLpvWBY

I guess the love of classical runs in the family haha.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads
#16
Yeah haha.
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads