#1
So I play 30-60 mins a day sometimes more. I've been playing for about 4 months. And I'm still learning the basics. But I don't know what to practice. I practice some chords, songs, and scales. But after awhile I stop and do my own thing. And well haha seems like I'm not improving. So should I just stay with learning songs? Or chords? Or scales? Or just everyday mix it up?
#3
Practice chords, songs, and scales until they become second nature then just up the difficulty. To improve you just have to keep challenging yourself.
#4
Identify goals, then work towards those goals.

Both long term and short term goals.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#5
There is just so much to consider when it comes to guitar. You might try going out and getting a book on technique. I've been playing 13 years and I recently bought one. Now what I do, and this might work for you, might not. But I warm up with a displaced octave thing and a chord changing thing I saw in Guitar One. Then I move to other exercises, then I play some songs I know, back to technique, then I go into working on my own stuff which also encompasses theory, writing, and I guess improvising.. That's what I do anyway.
#7
Find a solo that is ridiculously challenging. Learn it at a slower tempo. Use a metronome and find the max speed you can play it cleanly and efficiently. Practice it each day for a half-hour to an hour, increasing the tempo by 1 BPM or more if possible. Within a month or even a few weeks, you should be able to play something you previously thought was beyond your skill level.

Also learn songs with certain techniques you do not know yet, ie. harmonics, pre-bends, different types of vibrator, chords you aren't familiar with, tremolo picking, double stops, etc. It will be much more entertaining than trying to learn them without context
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#8
Quote by BlazingThrasher
So I play 30-60 mins a day sometimes more. I've been playing for about 4 months. And I'm still learning the basics. But I don't know what to practice. I practice some chords, songs, and scales. But after awhile I stop and do my own thing. And well haha seems like I'm not improving. So should I just stay with learning songs? Or chords? Or scales? Or just everyday mix it up?

Is hiring a guitar teacher an option? For one lesson/consultation?
#9
Quote by another_dave
Is hiring a guitar teacher an option? For one lesson/consultation?


Failing that, here's some stuff for free:

http://chainsawguitartuition.net/blog/how-to-practice-effectively/

if you have any questions you can message me and I'll do my best to help and yes, just "doing your own thing" is part of practise (or part of learning, technically...).
#10
Tony Oresko has a nice article on practice for guitarists. I especially liked what he says about scales:

...a lot of people forget about dynamics in music (playing loud and soft), so everything ends up on the same volume level and loses musicality. Try this as an exercise: Choose a scale you know well - any one will do. Now start by playing quietly, then very gradually increase the loudness so that you are playing as loud as possible when you reach the mid point of the scale. Now as you play the second half of the scale start playing quieter and quieter until you play as quiet as possible at the end.

You can also change this round - start out loud, play quiet in the middle then finish loud. You can then invent endless numbers of more complex patterns to practice, e.g. getting louder for 3 notes, then getting quieter for 4 notes, then louder for 2 notes... and so on. You can also practice changing abruptly from playing loud to playing quiet, e.g. 4 notes at full volume, then suddenly play a few notes as quiet as a whisper. The trick is to be able to do it all in a very controlled way.

(The link to a Trinity scales PDF in the article seems to be out of date. You have to buy Trinity's scale book now, there is no free download.)
#12
Quote by BlazingThrasher
What about this guys site. I believe it's justinguitar.com ?

Isn't that lessons?
#13
Messing with your own stuff is cool, but I got the most from learning songs, and playing them with backing tracks until my fingers hurt. I got to where playing the music was very intuitive.

I used to be "that guy" who learned popular well-known riffs. When it came to jamming with others, they'd get all excited that I knew something cool, and then get disappointed because I only knew the cool riff and nothing else - "all show & no go".

Playing with backing tracks also keeps your rhythm tight so you don't have to fix it later when you realize your "mental clock" goes really fast during easy stuff/really slow on hard stuff.

Structure practice so that it is segmented. Warm up, maybe with some scales. Play songs to backing tracks or drum machine beats. Then maybe dissect some chords and move different chords around the fretboard and using different forms.

Try not to be an ADD guitarist.