#1
Hello,


My band is getting ready to be finished with our demo/ep and I was wondering when is the right time to submit our demo to a label?

What do we need to look more professional?
Press kit, promo photos, list of shows and attendance?
#2
Get a manager first. Everything in the second paragraph would be covered in the how to market your band sticky. Have you played any shows yet?
#3
Yes, We've played around 30/40.

How do I look for a manager?
Craigslist is probably not the best choice lol
#4
Typically, in your submission to a label you'll want the standard 8X10 picture, a short band bio, and any sales records of cds, shirts, whatever. If you have a means to prove attendance at your shows, that will go a long way to help you out. I always had the places I played at keep a record of how many people showed up and had them sign it and put their number for reference. They usually didn't mind.

I would tell you to get a good entertainment lawyer and a manager. Be nice to your manager. He'll have to deal with a lot of shit. The lawyer, while expensive will be an essential asset in making sure you don't get ripped off. There's a lot of wording in a contract that will be confusing to you. And since a good bit of that wording has to do with money, you want to be damn sure you know where it's going and how it's coming back.

Label's are a business, so if you can prove you have marketability, that you've sold merch of some sort, you've sold cds, and have played shows away from your city, they'll be more interested in you because you'll bring them money too. I wouldn't bother with one of the real big labels. Try hitting up the smaller labels. They generally won't give you a lot of money at all, but if you're a good band you can record a good cd. Once you've built up some steam on a small label, then try to go the next step. It's all about taking small, well planned steps.
#5
Labels will sign you when they have a good assurance that, if they do, that they will make money beyond what they will spend on you. How do you assure them of that? By proving that you are *already* making money and have an active following.

Be prepared to tell them things like:
-how many CD's or downloads you have sold
-how active your social media profiles are (plays, friends/followers, likes, etc)
-the geographic extent of your current market/fan-base
-how "in demand" your live show is (tour schedule, etc)

You will be ready to submit when you can build a compelling case.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
^ This exactly.

It also doesnt hurt to show that you've toured outside your local area, so touring a few states or a national tour would go a long way.

It takes bands/artists years to get record deals, and with the way the music industry's going not many labels are willing to take many chances, you gotta pay your dues first. Tour, network, build up a fanbase.

Edit: When you get a manager treat them well, like a member of the band and it'll be worth your while.
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Last edited by Aussie_skater at Sep 2, 2011,
#7
What is your fanbase like? Do you already have shows which attract hundreds of people? What about pre-sales of the EP? High?

Well if not, why would I sign you when other bands in the area are doing those things?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
I'm going to be honest here: you're not getting a record deal any time soon.


You're what, 17? My advice: just spend the next few years playing music, having fun, getting loads of experience and having good fun. Learn your instrument inside out, get used to jamming and then, in a few years, you'll be older, wiser and in a much better position to get into the music industry.

There's nothing sadder than seeing all these young, mediocre bands wasting their teenage years desperately trying to 'make it', instead of having fun and actually getting better....

I'm 23 and my band are on the verge of signing a record deal, which is a pleasant surprise after five years of constant gigging, writing and jamming, playing covers in bars to make money and have a good time.
Ironically, I'm certain if we'd spent the last few years chasing pipe dreams and trying to get signed instead of working hard and getting good at our craft, we'd never have got good enough to be in this position in the first place!
#9
Now a days....good luck sending your demo in and expecting a deal. If your worth their time, they'll find you.

Polish your product
show that you are marketable
show that you can make money

and someone will approach you.
#10
Quote by scguitarking927

Polish your product
show that you are marketable
show that you can make money


+1


The music industry is just that - an industry. You've got to have a saleable 'package' these days.
#11
You're probably better of waiting until you have gotten some offers from small labels.
#12
Send it off whenever its ready. As long as its ready, and the band is ready then there is no reason at all to send it in.
If you send your EP in 4 times over a year, and each time the press kit that comes with it has more and more appeal (for example all the market trends surrounding you're band are going up) then they'll think "these guys are going somewhere".
If you send it in just once in the year after you've got all that, you may look static.

If you think you can re-record some of the vocals or add a better track to it, do that as soon as possible. In the mean time, get a package ready and keep gigging and having fun.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#13
Quote by W4T3V3R
Send it off whenever its ready. As long as its ready, and the band is ready then there is no reason at all to send it in.
If you send your EP in 4 times over a year, and each time the press kit that comes with it has more and more appeal (for example all the market trends surrounding you're band are going up) then they'll think "these guys are going somewhere".
If you send it in just once in the year after you've got all that, you may look static.

If you think you can re-record some of the vocals or add a better track to it, do that as soon as possible. In the mean time, get a package ready and keep gigging and having fun.


This is based on the idea that there is a little man in a room in the record company, and his job is to listen to every EP sent to the label. He'll then proceed to "flip out" at random and get them signed.

Perhaps that's not the reality.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by kyle62
I'm going to be honest here: you're not getting a record deal any time soon.


You're what, 17? My advice: just spend the next few years playing music, having fun, getting loads of experience and having good fun. Learn your instrument inside out, get used to jamming and then, in a few years, you'll be older, wiser and in a much better position to get into the music industry.

There's nothing sadder than seeing all these young, mediocre bands wasting their teenage years desperately trying to 'make it', instead of having fun and actually getting better....

I'm 23 and my band are on the verge of signing a record deal, which is a pleasant surprise after five years of constant gigging, writing and jamming, playing covers in bars to make money and have a good time.
Ironically, I'm certain if we'd spent the last few years chasing pipe dreams and trying to get signed instead of working hard and getting good at our craft, we'd never have got good enough to be in this position in the first place!

Really? Congrats dude!
Actually called Mark!

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