#1
Yes, probably common, but everyone has different preferences.

Alright, so I'm a bassist by nature and I'm learning acoustic guitar because I plan on starting an acoustic-country solo project.

I looking for a nice $200-300, acoustic/electric that has a deep, mellow tone with mellow highs and good mids. I don't really want to have the highs ringing, i want them to just flow, and I hate the sounds of tinny guitars. I've heard mahogany would probably be the best bet.

In short, I want a good guitar that has a deep, mellow, easy tone without the ringing, tinny highs of something like a Taylor.

Thanks.
#2
Also, I really would like for it to NOT have a cutout.

I've looked at a Washburn WD-10SCE and thought it sounded nice for the price. Opinions?
#3
Here's the only accoustic country guitar for me:

It's a Guild--that and it sounds great live, even with a broken string, are all I know about it.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Sep 1, 2011,
#4
MY SUGGESTION
Brand:Fender
Model:Squier
Price:150$ (from official store)
Experience:Great,sounds same for 3 years
How often have we chased the dream of progress, only to see that dream perverted?
More often than not, haven't the machines we built to improve life shattered the lives of millions?
And now we want to turn that dream on ourselves, to fundamentally improve who we are.
Experience has shown me how dangerous that can be.
#5
This is a pretty common questions and all the answers are the same .

Most people here are biased because of the guitar they play - I play a Crafter and love it, so I would recommend one to you. Some people may not be biased and will post a link of all guitars in that price range fitting your wants. This can be very helpful, but whatever you do, don't buy one online without playing it first!

The best bet would to go into a guitar shop and have a look at the guitars yourself. The only bit of advice I would give, and many others would give, is to make sure its a solid top. Solid tops have a much better sound, but you have to pay for it. Just look at the edge of the sound hole, and if you can see the grain running through it your holding a solid top. If not its a laminate.

Go in and have a look. Give each guitar a strum (you don't need to play it) until you find one with the balance you want, then pick it up and see if you like playing it. Don't ignore guitars just because they have a cheaper price tag - you may prefer the sound and playability of them to the more expensive makes and models.

And you may even find a guitar you love that has a cutaway (shock, horror!).
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
#6


...Give each guitar a strum (you don't need to play it) until you find one with the balance you want, then pick it up and see if you like playing it. Don't ignore guitars just because they have a cheaper price tag - you may prefer the sound and playability of them to the more expensive makes and models...

Great answer.

1 Question, though: Most of the guitars I've seen in stores had atrocious strings. How do you get past that in your testing?
#7
Check out Seagull guitars, they're high quality and yet reasonably priced. You should be able to find an acoustic/electic within your price range.
#8
That's a very good question

Personally I've never had that problem. My two local shops have good strings on the guitars. But I suppose if all the strings are bad, it would still be the best sounding one. But I'm honestly not sure. You could ask the assistants to change them, and point out that if you can't decide between guitars because of the strings your not going to buy one. That could scare them into the changing the strings because of lost custom.

It depends how bad the strings are though. I recently changed some 14 year old strings on my dads Tanglewood and was surprised at how much the balance changed (but the strings where BLACK). But with my own acoustic guitar the balance of the sound is always the same, but depending on the age of the strings the brightness of the sound varies. But I would try getting the strings changed. You would hate to buy the guitar, get home, unwrap it, change the strings and find out it sounds completely different.

So go back and have a look
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
Last edited by Fuzzywhynotry at Sep 3, 2011,
#9
um... no. seagull doesn't sell a guitar that cheap at all.

i play guitars at stores all the time, and live by 6 guitar centers, 2 sam ash stores, and there are a half dozen large indie stores we visit regularly. that being said, i don't know of one acoustic electric i consider decent with deep mellow bass in this price range.

you might want to try one of these
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/washburn-wd-10sce-cutaway-acoustic-electric-guitar/430375000010000
or maybe a fender sonoran. didn't love either, but at least they have solid tops and less brightness than most guitars in the $200 to $300 price range.

Quote by uberson
Check out Seagull guitars, they're high quality and yet reasonably priced. You should be able to find an acoustic/electic within your price range.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#10
Quote by Fuzzywhynotry
That's a very good question

Personally I've never had that problem. My two local shops have good strings on the guitars. But I suppose if all the strings are bad, it would still be the best sounding one. But I'm honestly not sure. You could ask the assistants to change them, and point out that if you can't decide between guitars because of the strings your not going to buy one. That could scare them into the changing the strings because of lost custom.

It depends how bad the strings are though. I recently changed some 14 year old strings on my dads Tanglewood and was surprised at how much the balance changed (but the strings where BLACK). But with my own acoustic guitar the balance of the sound is always the same, but depending on the age of the strings the brightness of the sound varies. But I would try getting the strings changed. You would hate to buy the guitar, get home, unwrap it, change the strings and find out it sounds completely different.

So go back and have a look


Yeah, I don't play accoustic much--the strings were like 5+ y/o on our accoustic (and black) when I changed them a year or 2 ago. But it made a huge difference.

That hasn't been an issue for my electrics because either they've been new enough that the strings were still good or I had been lusting after those particular guitars early in their lives at the store and already knew what they were like with fresh strings. The one I bought in a pawnshop didn't even have strings. I bought my last guitar at Best Buy and they actually keep fresh strings on those, but for 33% off street price I would have bought it anyway.