#1
I've been looking at getting some budget monitors for around £100, I understand that this isn't going to buy me high-end monitors.
I've found the M-Audio AV40, every review says that these monitors are unbelievable for there price. so I think I'm going to go with them, has anybody had any experience with them?

But my main question is this, could someone please explain to me the different types of monitors, I've heard terms such as;
reference monitors
reference speakers
near-field monitors

are they different?

Thanks
@jecox ssssoooo ssweeeet that whole set up is so sweet. If I had any distortion/delay setup it would be the akai headrush and BM. Awesome set up.



#2
I've been led to believe "reference" means studio-quality - they don't colour the sound with any EQs (like, how Monster headphones tend to up the bass for example) in any way. Sort of like true-bypass they don't change the sound of the music.

If I am wrong I'd like to be corrected, because funnily enough I wondered about this the other day.
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#3
Ahh thanks, hope your correct
@jecox ssssoooo ssweeeet that whole set up is so sweet. If I had any distortion/delay setup it would be the akai headrush and BM. Awesome set up.



#4
I wouldn't go with the AV40s. They're basically bookshelf speakers
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#5
AV40's have a reputation for being pretty atrocious - I'd imagine the people reviewing them where you had a positive impression are probably people who bought them just to listen to music on/as gaming pc speakers so don't care too much about sound quality.


Also, I'll clarify - reference monitors and reference speakers are the same thing. Monitors are speakers, just that good monitors are speakers that are intended to have a flat frequency response across the audible bandwidth. Monitors are just speakers for listening, hence the name and basically meaning any speaker you choose to make audio judgements on.

Near-field refers to the fact that these are fairly small speakers to be used from close range ('near-field') in-line with or not far from the computer 'control' position, and thus the central listening position. There are also, I guess, 'mid-field' speakers, which I'd define as a setup with larger speakers that are back a little, and then far-fields are usually wall-mounted (called 'suffit' mounting) in larger control rooms and are typically much larger speaker systems with several woofers (the larger speaker designed for the low end of the cross-over network, as opposed to the much smaller tweeters, which cover the higher end and upper midrange) in each enclosure.
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#6
I had the AV40s, still do really, but now they're my bookshelf multimedia speakers. Here's the thing, if you have a local shop that cuts deals, you can get KRK R5 monitors for about $50 more than the AV40s, and that's a GIGANTIC difference in quality. Also craigslist or eBay can get you similar monitors for the same ballpark. If you have $2-300 to spend, check out the used market and ask your local shop. If you don't, then you may want to save up before getting monitors.
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#7
Quote by Sid McCall
I had the AV40s, still do really, but now they're my bookshelf multimedia speakers. Here's the thing, if you have a local shop that cuts deals, you can get KRK R5 monitors for about $50 more than the AV40s, and that's a GIGANTIC difference in quality. Also craigslist or eBay can get you similar monitors for the same ballpark. If you have $2-300 to spend, check out the used market and ask your local shop. If you don't, then you may want to save up before getting monitors.


This, very much this
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