#1
so guy, just wanted to ask your opinion on being a sound guy for a live concert...
how do you set up the sound? do you get to know the bands on the sound check and do your job from there or do you say idk require CDs of what they're gonna play to have a very precise sound? May be a list of the tracks and descriptions of what each song represents?

peace
#2
If someone would actually bother ''getting to know the band'' before they set up the sound for ya...well that would be awesome. It sucks to have idk...a classic rock sound while playing punk rock.
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#3
Location Location Location.


Know where to set up your mics and FFS, learn how to properly mix and set up their sound. Nothing worse than listening to a band with shitty EQ settings on.
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#4
Most of the sound guys I've dealt with just mic you up, tell the bass player to turn down (one once told me (when I was playing bass) to keep turning down so far that I had to tell him that any more down was literally off) bitch about the guitarist's eq settings and continue to mess about with everything all the way through the set.
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#5
You have to know the venue very well, or at least you should. Then yea, mic everything properly and do your best with the mix. Listen to the musicians.
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#6
As a guy who deals with sound people on a regular basis, it certainly doesn't help to have a chat with the band about what sorts of sound they like and to also prior to the gig to get a list of the gear the band are bringing and how many mics etc they want to use.

You don't want any surprises like the band turning up with 4 keyboards and special equipment you aren't certain how to set up properly and not have enough cables / stands / what ever to accommodate.

I would expect the band to approach the sound guy and at least make some kind of effort, if not I guess it's up to you.

If I were you I'd do the following:

Get an equipment list and find out what gear the venue has (this is usually done by the promoter but it's within your own interest to find out what's available)

Listen to the bands online if possible so you have an idea of what you're going to be working with

Know about mic placement and be courteous of the bands music whether you like it or not and aim for a BALANCED and EVEN sound - not shit loads of guitar and low vocals because you're a riff junky.

And most importantly be professional and patient.
#7
Nice points guys

The reason im asking is actually more in/for the band's interest. Sure setting up a sound is cool but what if their songs vary a lot in genres and all, do you guys get like a list of automation (like here's a mellow song with the following sound, here's a bluesy tune, a metal tune..) idk.. like hwo to make it ALL the way professional?
#8
^ Match the band, not the genre. As a bass player for example, I find it quite irritating that most sound guys default setting is to have inaudible bass... that doesn't particularly complement my bands songs that often have more prominent basslines. However, when listening to some of the other bands, it's clear why they default to the "inaudible bass" setting, because that seems to suit the majority of the playing. That being said, often if I speak to the tech beforehand and explain, they're more than happy to tailor a mix that works better for us, and the sound is better off for it. So yeah, get a rough idea of the band, and what sort of levels/sounds work for them.
#9
hey, sound guy here.

1. make sure you know what your getting yourself into, if something goes wrong and you don't know what to do, the entire gig is on hold.

2. when you set everything up, make sure the band is comfortable. no point in arguing about mic placement or anything if the band doesn't agree. you want them on your side.

3. make everything look neat, if a lead is too long, leave the spare length coiled near the relative mic.

4. the question "how do you set up the sound" is a bit concerning.... how much knowledge in this area do you have? if none, there's probably alot more for you to be thinking about other than studying the band's songs, because you need to know how to reproduce those sounds.
#10
It's a bit like mixing in the studio except you need to be constantly tweaking things throughout the performance. Don't worry about individual songs and what they represent, you'll have more than enough to worry about without that. Just try to make sure everything is audible and around the same level, then worry about stylistic touches.
#11
Seems like most of the sound techs around here suck. 99% of the shows I've been to the singer is nearly completely inaudible.
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#12
Quote by soul_power
Seems like most of the sound techs around here suck. 99% of the shows I've been to the singer is nearly completely inaudible.

hmmm that has happened to here as well (pretty a lot) what i hear (not) more often is inaudible guitar... you can rarely hear it


Quote by Ziphoblat
As a bass player for example, I find it quite irritating that most sound guys default setting is to have inaudible bass...

you'd i guess love it here.. it's always bass and drums blasting on max while you can barely hear the guitar. vocals are kind of meh most of the time as well..


Quote by hey_guys553
hey, sound guy here.

1. make sure you know what your getting yourself into, if something goes wrong and you don't know what to do, the entire gig is on hold.

2. when you set everything up, make sure the band is comfortable. no point in arguing about mic placement or anything if the band doesn't agree. you want them on your side.

3. make everything look neat, if a lead is too long, leave the spare length coiled near the relative mic.

4. the question "how do you set up the sound" is a bit concerning.... how much knowledge in this area do you have? if none, there's probably alot more for you to be thinking about other than studying the band's songs, because you need to know how to reproduce those sounds.

not that much when it comes to live sound setup really, but as I mentioned before I was wondering this more from the performer's opinion. Do you think that me playing with backing tracks and wanting control over my whole sound, like having my guitar mixed with the backing track on a little mixer that's next to me is of a big hassle for sound guys? I do have few tracks that require some volume adjustment and also as I said I don't trust the sound guys here much (have enough of reasons to do so ) and do like to hear just completely what I'm hearing most of the time due to me being used to playing in the overall mix and knowing how the things should sound that way.
idk if that made since really so sorry if it didn't, just let me know and I'll try to rephrase it

and also i'd love to learn more about the live sound setup but I do not know where to start from
#13
I personally would think that it would be the band (at indie level) to approach the sound guy to explain the sound they want. I mean it's their job to make themselves sound good. But yes, a good sound guy will know what to do with whatever sound really. Unfortunately, most sound guys are hired for the venue and not the band, so they'll just mic them up, balance the levels and mix and let it go on as that.
#14
Quote by Vendetta V
not that much when it comes to live sound setup really, but as I mentioned before I was wondering this more from the performer's opinion. Do you think that me playing with backing tracks and wanting control over my whole sound, like having my guitar mixed with the backing track on a little mixer that's next to me is of a big hassle for sound guys? I do have few tracks that require some volume adjustment and also as I said I don't trust the sound guys here much (have enough of reasons to do so ) and do like to hear just completely what I'm hearing most of the time due to me being used to playing in the overall mix and knowing how the things should sound that way.
idk if that made since really so sorry if it didn't, just let me know and I'll try to rephrase it

and also i'd love to learn more about the live sound setup but I do not know where to start from

Well, you have to remember that what you hear on stage is different than what the audience hears. You're close to your amp, you're close to your monitors, and monitors don't sound like a P.A. I get what you're trying to do, but yeah, sometimes you just have to put faith in the soundman and hope that he gives you what you're going for.
#15
Quote by DashBlaster
Well, you have to remember that what you hear on stage is different than what the audience hears. You're close to your amp, you're close to your monitors, and monitors don't sound like a P.A. I get what you're trying to do, but yeah, sometimes you just have to put faith in the soundman and hope that he gives you what you're going for.

yeah i see your point. the thing is also that my Mixer has only 2 outputs which sux

anyways, the good thing is that the rest is premixed so it's only the guitar to put in the mix... hope they won't do anything bad even with that...