#1
Wat is the most vintage sounding strat? I want John Frusciante's tone and he uses vintage strats. Budget $3000. Still need to get an amp though.
#2
He uses Seymour Duncan Antiquities, if I recall right.

But without the right amp, you won't sound anything like him, even if you do have the same pickups.

EDIT: Guitar wise, it's Alnico-5, vintage wound pups. If you get a guitar with pickups along those lines, then you should be set. Though, you can see that he uses a lot of guitars, but he still sounds "like fru"...So I'm assuming most of his recognizable tones comes from the amp (Marshall Silver Jubilee for distortion, Marshall Major for clean) and the Boss DS-2 and his WH-10, which he's kept on his board through the eras.
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Last edited by AntiG3 at Sep 4, 2011,
#3
Should I get it in alder or ash? Maybe maple for extra brightness? What about neck and fingerboard woods?
#4
Well the Stratocaster in its original form was offered in an alder body with a one piece solid maple neck and fingerboard. So If you want the most vintage that would be the one I suppose.
#5
Quote by rhcp_rulz95
Should I get it in alder or ash? Maybe maple for extra brightness? What about neck and fingerboard woods?


If you're looking for a vintage Strat tone, the most common combinations by far would be an alder body with a either a one-piece maple neck or a mple neck with a rosewood fretboard, or an ash body with a one-piece maple neck.

Most people would find a maple body too bright (and heavy). Ash with a rosewood fretboard gives a lot of "sizzle" in the high end that a lot of players don't like.

I'm not very familiar with John's gear, but he seems to prefer Strats with a rosewood fretboard. It would be a safe bet that his Strats with rosewood fretboards would have alder bodies.

Pickups should be Alnico V (most pickup manufacturers don't the same Alnico V that was used on vintage Strats) with low output, but even the wrong Alnico V is going to get you closer than anything else.

A 6-screw vintage style tremolo bridge with bent steel saddles is a crucial element of the vintage Strat tone. The inertia block should not be tapered (as most modern blocks are to allow greater tremolo range) and should be made of steel.

A Fender Eric Johnson rosewood fretboard Strat might be a good choice, but the pickups are pretty idiosyncratic to Eric's style. That's easy enough to sort out though.
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#6
Edwards makes a replica of Frusciante's 62. The description on this site isn't great, but it's a great guitar and the price still leaves you a bunch of money for a good amp. The specs are the same as his actual guitar, and the pickups are the same as Frusciante's as well. I'd say it's as close as you'll get without buying an actual vintage strat.
http://www.guitarjapan.com/edwards/spec/e-se-118r_re.html

If you don't like the relic thing, a Fender 62 or 57 reissue will be close as well.
#7
seems like you really don't know much about equipment. if you think that just by buying a similar strat to what john plays is going to make you sound like him you will be sorely disappointed. his sound is a combo of guitar, amps and fx. the biggest thing though is his playing style which you can't just buy. tone chasing is a fools errand and even if he let you come up on stage and play through his very own equipment that still wouldn't guarentee that you'd sound like him.
#8
Sure, but a vintage strat is clearly a cornerstone of the sound, as is a Marshall. He's just starting out with gear it seems, so buying the entire Moog catalog is not a good idea. Starting with the right guitar and amp is the right idea, I think. A reissue or replica '50s or '60s strat and a JCM800 or a Jubilee are the place to start, and get you a solid base for the sound. From there, a DS-2 and a big Muff get you 90% of the non-treated tones he uses live.

Asking for "the most vintage" guitar is not a great question to ask, since there was plenty of variance in vintage strats, but trying to find a strat that sounds similar to a '54-'63 model is a fine idea if you like the Frusciante sound.
#9
In my opinion with that budget you could be buying a Custom Shop guitar which will be expertly built and be great to play, then you could drop in some similar pickups. Just go and try some out, that's what I'd do if I were you.
#11
Quote by Roc8995
Sure, but a vintage strat is clearly a cornerstone of the sound, as is a Marshall. He's just starting out with gear it seems, so buying the entire Moog catalog is not a good idea. Starting with the right guitar and amp is the right idea, I think. A reissue or replica '50s or '60s strat and a JCM800 or a Jubilee are the place to start, and get you a solid base for the sound. From there, a DS-2 and a big Muff get you 90% of the non-treated tones he uses live.

Asking for "the most vintage" guitar is not a great question to ask, since there was plenty of variance in vintage strats, but trying to find a strat that sounds similar to a '54-'63 model is a fine idea if you like the Frusciante sound.


this isn't correct though. just having similar gear in no way assures you to have a similar sound. it would seem that easy but the reality is that it isn't. there are tons of threads all over the net about getting Johns sound if it was as easy as getting similar gear then i'd guess that there would be no need for all those threads. my response is to point this out so the OP doesn't just blindly spend his money and end up disappointed.
#12
I think it is correct. It takes some practice and attention to technique to get that sound. That doesn't mean that there's no point in getting gear that will reward those techniques, though.

I've assumed that someone spending $3000 on gear is going to take the time to learn how use it properly. Perhaps that's a false assumption, but your assessment that my suggestions are worthless is wrong. I think they're completely valid. Isn't it more constructive to say "Make sure you know how to use the gear, then get the right tools for the job" than it is to say, without any real evidence of the situation, "You don't know how to use this gear, don't bother" ?

Plus, he's going to get some gear - what other criteria should he use? If his goal is to sound like Frusciante, why would it matter if he's been playing for 3 months or 20 years? If you want to sound like that, you get a vintage strat. It's not like he's going to go buy a BC Rich now because "the tone is in the fingers."
#13
Quote by Roc8995
I think it is correct. It takes some practice and attention to technique to get that sound. That doesn't mean that there's no point in getting gear that will reward those techniques, though.

I've assumed that someone spending $3000 on gear is going to take the time to learn how use it properly. Perhaps that's a false assumption, but your assessment that my suggestions are worthless is wrong. I think they're completely valid. Isn't it more constructive to say "Make sure you know how to use the gear, then get the right tools for the job" than it is to say, without any real evidence of the situation, "You don't know how to use this gear, don't bother" ?

Plus, he's going to get some gear - what other criteria should he use? If his goal is to sound like Frusciante, why would it matter if he's been playing for 3 months or 20 years? If you want to sound like that, you get a vintage strat. It's not like he's going to go buy a BC Rich now because "the tone is in the fingers."


dude at no time did i say what you posted was "worthless". now if you take the time to read what the OP is saying then you'd realize that he desn't have the know how to get the sound he wants. what he want to do is to throw money at and get instant gratification. this is my point, just buying the same gear won't automatically give you the sound. now of course you need a strat to sound like john and having an amp with similar charateristics makes sense but that is only a piece of the puzzle and not the total answer. just saying buy the same gear isn't helping a guy like this. i just don't want to tell a guy yeah sure spend your 3 grand and i'm sure you'll sound just like him. that isn't going to help him in the long run. i can't even tell you how many guys i've seen over the years run out aget the same gear as ------ only to be disappointed and say WTF.
#14
The words "tone chasing is a fool's errand" are what bothered me. I think sounding somewhat like someone whose music you enjoy playing is a completely reachable and rewarding goal.

Anyway, I don't see any point in posting more until the threadstarter comes back and gives us more information about what he wants. I think we can agree that if he's not willing or able to spend a lot of time on techniques, it's not worth spending that much money on instruments, for any reason.
#15
If your dumb enough to think you can buy gear and sound like jimmy page or anyone great, then you deserve all you get.
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#16
Quote by Snapple
If your dumb enough to think you can buy gear and sound like jimmy page or anyone great, then you deserve all you get.

Yes, I think we've been over that just now. However, if you can play like Jimmy Page, and you want to sound more like him, you'll need to trade in your Squier Strat for a Les Paul.

I don't think it's fair to assume that people buying gear to sound like people are under the impression that gear is the only aspect of tone. This is the electric guitar section, and here we discuss electric guitars. If you want to discuss techniques, there's a different forum for that.
#17
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, I think we've been over that just now. However, if you can play like Jimmy Page, and you want to sound more like him, you'll need to trade in your Squier Strat for a Les Paul.

I don't think it's fair to assume that people buying gear to sound like people are under the impression that gear is the only aspect of tone. This is the electric guitar section, and here we discuss electric guitars. If you want to discuss techniques, there's a different forum for that.


Totally agree
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#18
If it was me I'd just geta Deluxe Strat. IMO it's one of the better Strats and is only $1600-1700. The money left over would get you a serious amp.
Moving on.....
#19
Quote by Roc8995
The words "tone chasing is a fool's errand" are what bothered me. I think sounding somewhat like someone whose music you enjoy playing is a completely reachable and rewarding goal.

Anyway, I don't see any point in posting more until the threadstarter comes back and gives us more information about what he wants. I think we can agree that if he's not willing or able to spend a lot of time on techniques, it's not worth spending that much money on instruments, for any reason.


almost never does anyone post saying how can i sound somewhat like _____. it would be much easier on the rest of us if they did but that doesn't happen often. when i talk about "tone chasing" i'm refering to those who's goal is to sound EXACTLY like ______. this is what i'm refering to wheni say that is foolish. have you ever met another player that truly "nailed" a famous players sound, i know i haven't. seen plenty of guys beating thee head agains the wall trying though. so once again i don't want to just say "yeah go buy the same gear" and have the guy get upset because he doesn't "nail" the sound and only "somewhat" gets it. also there are often way cheaper ways to "somewhat" get someones tone so you can enjoy playing their music. the OP can buy a US Standard strat and any number of different amps that get a marshally sound and still have money left over while still having quality gear.
#20
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, I think we've been over that just now. However, if you can play like Jimmy Page, and you want to sound more like him, you'll need to trade in your Squier Strat for a Les Paul.

I don't think it's fair to assume that people buying gear to sound like people are under the impression that gear is the only aspect of tone. This is the electric guitar section, and here we discuss electric guitars. If you want to discuss techniques, there's a different forum for that.




Though I do agree with monwowowobobo as well...

TS - get a decent strat, get a Marshall or Marshall-esque amp, a Big Muff and you're in the right direction. From there you can do what you want.

Or alternatively, buy exactly what gear he has including this

Last edited by Duv at Sep 4, 2011,