#1
Hi.
I have had a problem lately. My left hand and the fingers start to hurt when i have olayed for 4 hours or so. I start to feel pain after 3 hours, and whan i have played for 4, i have a hard time doing anything 16th note-based, because of the pain. I have asked my guitar teacher about it, and he says that there is nothing wrong with my tecniuqe. I don't think i lay to much either, and i could have played 6 hrs a day, if it wasn't for the pain. Pepole like steve vai played 10-15 hrs a day whitout getting tired. So what can i do to make the pain go away I always stretch out before i play.
#2
I watched your video to see if i saw anything. Only thing i can think of is the way you sit, your left hand has to come around alot becasue the guitar is on your right knee. Where as if it was on your left knee the angle from your elbow is perpendicular to the fretboard rather than at an overbent angle.

Or it could just be stamina, cant expect to play all day!
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#3
Think it's a stamina problem. Vai and friends have been doing this for YEARS, so it's understandable
#4
Its steming from your thumb position i think. Bring it to the apex of the neck if not below it. Itll help straighten out your wrist which could end the pain.
#5
Pain is NOT because of lack of stamina. If you lack in stamina you will just feel exhausted but you should never feel pain. Pain is caused by incorrect posture, bad technique or because you haven't warmed up. If you feel pain you shouldn't continue playing at all, it will just get worse and might persist.

It can also depend on what kind of stuff you play. You seem to play a lot of chord stuff so maybe you're pushing the strings too hard? I know my fingers start to hurt after extensive periods of playing big barre chords.

Maybe you're tensing up without noticing yourself? This video helped me a lot and I still utilize the advice given in it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZLt3deAzBw

I recommend checking out this guy's videos if you have any spare time: http://www.youtube.com/user/FreepowerUG#p/p (videos under "My Lessons")
They might or might not be directly related to your problem but help with practising technique in general.

Bottom line is that if playing hurts, stop until it feels comfortable again. Work out what's causing the pain because there shouldn't be any.
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#6
Quote by Usernames sucks
Hi.
I have had a problem lately. My left hand and the fingers start to hurt when i have olayed for 4 hours or so. I start to feel pain after 3 hours, and whan i have played for 4, i have a hard time doing anything 16th note-based, because of the pain. I have asked my guitar teacher about it, and he says that there is nothing wrong with my tecniuqe. I don't think i lay to much either, and i could have played 6 hrs a day, if it wasn't for the pain. Pepole like steve vai played 10-15 hrs a day whitout getting tired. So what can i do to make the pain go away I always stretch out before i play.



Can I get an official 100% trust-worthy false-proof source on that?
#7
just dont push urself too hard, increase the practising time gradually. Also, many ppl hv the same problem is tat they bend their bodies too low when they r sitting down to play, try to sit upright.
#8
you have to take breaks if you have pain... cause i didnt, and i ended up with RSI, and had to take 2 weeks off guitar. It wasent worth it for extra 30 mins i was practising for after my hand started hurting. carrying on through pain will not improve your playing, it might even slow you down or cause a long term problem.

since i first got RSI i have been very careful.

a few tips

-Warm up before playing, stretch out your hands, run though some scales slowly, and increase the speed over time. some people like the chromatic scale for this, others say its useless.. but whatever scales you know, use those. also play some open chords. i know you said you already do this, maybe warm up for longer

-dont play stuff fast that you are not comfortable with. Basically, if you are practicing a guitar solo, play the parts slowly, and get them correct. slowing increase the speed before playing with a backing track. (this could also apply to fast riffs or melodies)

- dont play for 4 hours straight. take 10 min breaks every 45 mins, and increase it to 10 mins every hour maybe if you find 45 mins too short.

-steve vai can only play for as long as he says he can because hes built up his stamina over years, and he changes the exercises, and he wont play lightning quick for the whole time. for example, if you have worked on a guitar solo for 45 mins, maybe practice the verse and chorus for 20 mins before doing more on the solo.

-make sure you are comfortable whilst playing. if you are playing sat down, sitting too far back or forward puts extra strain on your wrist. if you are stood up, having the guitar too low can also put more strain on your hand.

anyways gl
#9
Quote by david-vbhc
Its steming from your thumb position i think. Bring it to the apex of the neck if not below it. Itll help straighten out your wrist which could end the pain.


This.

Your thumb should be mostly at the back of the neck. In your video you can clearly see your thumb over the top of the neck, which shouldn't be happening.

Your thumb should be roughly behind where your fingertips are applying pressure, and it should be the support for that pressure (rather than using the palm of your hand as a support).

Just think about how you would pick something up. Do you grip between your fingers and your palm, or do you use your thumb?

and forget Steve Vai I used to practice 8 - 10 hours a day and I can tell you that it's not a stamina issue. It's technique.
#10
Steve Vai did rarely practice technique for 10 hours a day... He maybe played exercises, chords, jamming and so on for about half the time and musical stuff like sightreading, ear training, music theory the other half.
#11
Take breaks to break up your practice time, and make sure you stretch before you play. Also make sure you are playing without any tension and are relaxed.
#12
As others wisely said, take breaks, keep good posture, and if the pain starts take a break.

A couple things you really want to watch out for are the two most common repetitive stress injuries that guitarists are susceptible.

Carpal tunnel which usually shows it signs when your first and second fingers have numbness.

Orbital tunnel symptom strart with the forth and third fingers progressively turning numb and pain in the elbow. The ulnar nerve binds in the orbital opening in the elbow. Of the two types of injuries this one is more common among guitarists.

Either way if hand or elbow show these signs put the guitar down for a while, sometimes you need to lay off for a few days. If the symptoms still persist after a few days then you need to see your physician.

Luckily both these injuries can be corrected with surgery.