#1
hey guys. i don't know if the word residency is used around the world, but i mean a regular weekly spot at a venue. i'm just trying to get one of my own at the moment and i was wondering if any of you gentlemen have any stories about how they got their own ones? peace.
#3
It's the right forum though?
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#4
i dunno, i just thought it was a thing about band leading. what would a better forum be?
#5
Bandleading is the only one concerning these kinds of questions
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#7
I was in a band that had a residency, although I was not around when they started it. Aside from being good players with a good setlist, I can tell you that maturity and a solid visual presentation is important. For someone to even think about hiring you with such consistency they have to be sure that you will deliver good behaviour, good attitude, good punctuality and good style all very consistently alongside your good music. In other words, be mature - be professional.

Knowing the owner of the venue and having them and their friends as fans of your group is also a great help.
#8
A band I was once in (and still play the occasional gig with) used to have a residency. We got it because we'd just played a gig there and the venue owner had realised during the set that we could play requests and interacted well with the audience.

The band was called '3 Amigos', obviously a 3 piece, (nice and simple) and part of our act was to get the audience shouting out their favourite bands, and more often than not we'd know at least one song by whoever was being shouted for. (never ask for requests for 'songs', always 'bands')
I was on bass and vocals but the drummer and the guitarist also sang, so any one of us could take the lead vocals, and with three singers, it's more likely that one of you will know the words, and we were damned good at jamming, so if any one of us was too familiar with a song we were doing, we'd still get away with it.
It was sometimes a bit rough and ready but it was a lot of fun which conveyed to the audience nicely.

The thing is, if you're doing a residency, you have to be able to play an almost completely different set each week, because quite often, it's the same people seeing you each week and it'll soon get boring if you play all the same songs, so it involves a hell of a lot of rehearsal time during the week. Doing it our way, with the request thing, meant we didn't have to rehearse quite so much, but being able to do what we could do required a hell of a lot of experience on our parts because you're pretty much making the set up as you go along.
It's very hard work, but rewarding, playing a residency will stretch your abilities in a big way and make you all very competant musicians and performers, just so long as you can take it long enough to learn from it. Give it a go, but be prepared for some serious graft.

Remember, the Beatles got very good at what they did by playing a residency in Hamburg.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Sep 8, 2011,
#9
Can you remember what sort of stuff you tended to get asked for? And/or what the make-up of the crowd was? Sounds like a really awesome show.
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#10
Quote by Damascus
Can you remember what sort of stuff you tended to get asked for? And/or what the make-up of the crowd was? Sounds like a really awesome show.

Mainly classic rock with the odd punk and metal number here and there along with 60s stuff like Rolling Stones, Who, Beatles, that kinda thing, 'pub rock' basically.
#11
Was the crowd mixed-age and just wanted pub-rock 'cos...you were in a pub, or were they the right age group to be wanting classic rock, punk etc.?

I'm asking because I've been realising recently (doing cover gigs) that I have very little idea what non-musicians actually like/listen to/know/would want to hear, beyond the obvious hits that everyone knows. Luckily, the guy I'm gigging with has done this before & has a good mixed set, but when I read your post I thought "that sounds great" and then wondered what I would request, and then realised it would probably be pretty different to someone whose life doesn't really revolve around music.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#12
Quote by Damascus
Was the crowd mixed-age and just wanted pub-rock 'cos...you were in a pub, or were they the right age group to be wanting classic rock, punk etc.?

I'm asking because I've been realising recently (doing cover gigs) that I have very little idea what non-musicians actually like/listen to/know/would want to hear, beyond the obvious hits that everyone knows. Luckily, the guy I'm gigging with has done this before & has a good mixed set, but when I read your post I thought "that sounds great" and then wondered what I would request, and then realised it would probably be pretty different to someone whose life doesn't really revolve around music.


There's always gonna be that "one" guy who is a musician in the crowd, though, so knowing your way around some less well-known band tends to help. If you can impress a reasonably talented musician and get him to listen to you while keeping everyone else in the crowd interested, you can give yourself a real pat on the back.

If all goes well, you might get to cover some Rush or Grateful Dead, that should cover about 1/2 the set each
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Last edited by Hail at Sep 8, 2011,