#1
Hey guys I need your opinion on seemingly random pseudo-jazz sounding chord progressions. EG Teen town goes C13 - A13 - F13 - D13. I mean it's going down in thirds so there's a pattern , but apart from that I think it's pretty random. Sure sounds pretty cool, but totally whack eh.
UG's New Zealand Resident!
#2
It's going down in m3 intervals, and is substituting chords with dominant 7ths with a 13 in the 2nd octave. It's not really random at all. If anything, it is highly planned and thought out.

And if it sounds good, it's good.
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#3
Quote by Banjocal
It's going down in m3 intervals, and is substituting chords with dominant 7ths with a 13 in the 2nd octave. It's not really random at all. If anything, it is highly planned and thought out.

And if it sounds good, it's good.


+1
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#4
This chord progression actually sets up a system of chord progressions that is based on root progressions of 3rds. This kind of progression is different from those existing in the more-common chordal progressions by 5ths or 4ths (such as the ever common I - IV - I (or V6/4) - V - I). As such, many people often consider these chord progressions "fresh."

Wagner actually utilized progressions in 3rds in some of his operas.
Last edited by nmitchell076 at Sep 4, 2011,
#6
Quote by Darkmessiahnz
That's pretty cool regarding the Wagner. Thanks for the tips.

To add about working out progressions in a system like this:

Consider the progression I - IV - I (V6/4) - V - IV.

If we look at the root movement of this progression, you could see it as the following:
+ 4 - 4 - 4 + 4
(in other words, ascending by a fourth, descending by a fourth, descending by a fourth, etc.)
or
- 5 + 5 + 5 - 5

Thus we see that this progression is set up as a sort of "rotation" around the tonic by the interval of a fourth or a fifth (which are inverses of one another). This is why the root motion of such a progression establishes tonality so well.

Similarly, you could construct well functioning, logical progression in a system of thirds, for example:
+ 3 - 3 -3 + 3
which translates into:
I - iii - I - vi - I. This has a nice distribution of major-to-minor chords in its progression.

This is just an example, but it serves to illustrate that you can take basic principals of constructing progressions in a system of fourths and fifths and translate those principals into a system of thirds.