#1
Hey there guys! Most people told me that the closer the pickup, the better the sound. I say different. I say that there is a reason why there is a specific distance between the pickup and the strings. Which statement is more accurate? Also, what would you way about pickup height adjustment?
#2
You're wrong. Pickups sound best when they're actually touching the strings because then you get maximum overdrive.
#3
Quote by Helicopters!
You're wrong. Pickups sound best when they're actually touching the strings because then you get maximum overdrive.

this made me laugh
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#4
Higher pickup:
More bass and mids. More distortion. Muddier, bigger sound. More compressed dynamics. Easier to play.

Lower pickup:
Less mids and bass. Less distortion. Clearer, smoother sound. More dynamic. Harder to play.


The best sound is totally subjective.
Quote by blackflag49
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#5
Quote by prosong12345
I say that there is a reason why there is a specific distance between the pickup and the strings.

This is right imo, too close and strings might touch the pups (like on my guitar, I gotta fix that lol), causing annoying noises. Too far and you might get noise and a weak signal.
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#6
Helicopters si wrong. Pickups hace an specific hight. The notes are captured from the strings by a magnetic field produce by the Pubs. Now there is a sweet spot where the Pub captures the note both clear and strong. If you put the pickup too close to the string the magnetic field will reduce the movement of the string, if its too far away you wont capture the note properly. Active pickups and some others produce a magnetic field so weak that is necesaty for them to be near the string.

Basic Physics LOL
#7
I think, none if those are right. Of course, you need to have a specific distance between the strings and the pickup in order to avoid buzzing. But, in the end, everything depends on the tone you want. If you want a smooth, creamy tone on your neck pickup and don't count on sustain, setup the pickup as deep as possible. If you want a metal tone on the bridge pickup, set it pretty high to catch most of the attack.
#8
Quote by bingeandletgo
Higher pickup:
More bass and mids. More distortion. Muddier, bigger sound. More compressed dynamics. Easier to play.

Lower pickup:
Less mids and bass. Less distortion. Clearer, smoother sound. More dynamic. Harder to play.


The best sound is totally subjective.

How so?
#9
Quote by Helicopters!
You're wrong. Pickups sound best when they're actually touching the strings because then you get maximum overdrive.


Suggest you replace your pickups since the magnets appear to be worn out.
When I fix it so the strings touch they all stick to the magnets and its really hard to get much out of them at all.

BTW I'm working on the ultimate pickups - I'm going to super conducting windings and magnets that are so big they stick out the back of the guitar. I recon that with this arrangement I won't need an amplifier at all - just plug in a speaker cab.
#10
It depends on the pickup really, anyone who says otherwise has done too much reading, and not enough experimenting.

It's like with micing, you have to find the sweet spot for that pickup, neither too high, nor to low. Too high kills your sustain, and can cause muddiness due to excessive output, to low and it wont sound powerful enough, and again, be muddy, and will lack some high end clarity.

It's a balancing act, neither is better.
#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
It depends on the pickup really, anyone who says otherwise has done too much reading, and not enough experimenting.

It's like with micing, you have to find the sweet spot for that pickup, neither too high, nor to low. Too high kills your sustain, and can cause muddiness due to excessive output, to low and it wont sound powerful enough, and again, be muddy, and will lack some high end clarity.

It's a balancing act, neither is better.

No, there is no single "sweet spot". As pointed out, there is a considerable range, over which the sound achieved differs considerably, but is quite acceptable nonetheless. It's quite common to see a huge difference between the height at one end vs the other as well. Some people prefer that sound. Others prefer level. It will depend entirely on what you want to achieve and what you want to sound like. You will find as many different height variations on a given pickup among players as you will find different rigs.

Manufacturers recommendations for a particular height adjustment are nothing more than a suggested starting point. Kinman's website points out that height adjustment is one of the most important tone controls a guitarist has, and offers a suggestion as to a starting point.

I will concede, however, that extremes will cause the effects you mentioned.
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#13
Quote by OldRocker
The best pickup heights is your ears.


Exactly. Provided they're not obscenely high/low which brings its own problems the rest is down to that old friend PERSONAL PREFERENCE.

Don't buy into the easier to play/harder to play thing that someone mentioned above. Nonsense.
#14
Quote by Vulcan
No, there is no single "sweet spot". As pointed out, there is a considerable range, over which the sound achieved differs considerably, but is quite acceptable nonetheless. It's quite common to see a huge difference between the height at one end vs the other as well. Some people prefer that sound. Others prefer level. It will depend entirely on what you want to achieve and what you want to sound like. You will find as many different height variations on a given pickup among players as you will find different rigs.

Manufacturers recommendations for a particular height adjustment are nothing more than a suggested starting point. Kinman's website points out that height adjustment is one of the most important tone controls a guitarist has, and offers a suggestion as to a starting point.

I will concede, however, that extremes will cause the effects you mentioned.



The sweet spot is that spot you prefer, but it's usually not very far off from where the manufacture specs say it should be, the sweet spot is a general area where the pickup is most effective, it's not exact.
#15
I like get my bridge pickup close to the strings. I fret the high e and low e at the 24th fret(one at a time), raise the pickup until it touches the string, and then drop it down 1/8" to 1/4". The neck pickup is usually much lower though, I just raise and lower until I find a good balance of volume and tone.