#1
On a previous thread I asked about writing riffs. Well I wrote some and chose the one that I liked the best. I edited and revised it and now I think it sounds pretty decent for my first riff. Now the question is how do I chose the chords that will be played with it? If the first not of the riff is an E, should I play an E chord? I'm pretty confused at this point. Thanks for any advice!
#2
show the riff....the note doesnt tell the key or anything...

which notes are in the it...?
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IF YOU READ 'H' I MEAN 'B'

GERMAN H = AMERICAN B

#3
Quote by fluffymuffins
On a previous thread I asked about writing riffs. Well I wrote some and chose the one that I liked the best. I edited and revised it and now I think it sounds pretty decent for my first riff. Now the question is how do I chose the chords that will be played with it? If the first not of the riff is an E, should I play an E chord? I'm pretty confused at this point. Thanks for any advice!



Listen and choose a chord that sounds appropriate for the song.

suggestion: don't try to use theory as a composition recipe book. Composition is a creative art. You develop the skills and knowledge by playing and studying, but artistic ideas like what chord should I use in my own song, that's up to only 1 person...... you.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 5, 2011,
#4
This is the tricky part. Use your knowledge of chord construction and tension/release to harmonize your chord.

For example, if I play the following (all whole notes) as my riff:

E -> D -> C -> D

I can harmonize this any number of ways. Now, if you strictly followed the notes you could easily see a piece in E minor:

Em -> D -> C -> D

While solid, it may get a little dull: the only tension produced is harmonic tension from moving away from the tonic chord. What other chords have these notes in them?

A -> Bm -> Cm -> D

A totally different key! It appears we are in A now. However, still there is little tension and release within the melody itself, it is somewhat boring.

Em -> Am -> Am -> D7/A

Now we're cooking. The tonic chord (Em) is consonant. The second measure introduces a tension note (D) over the iv chord which is resolved properly to C in the next measure. The final chord is tense due to its tritone and inversion status (it's a sort of willy-nilly use of the second inversion, but whatever floats your boat--it could be rewritten as a F#*/A with a non-chord tone, but this is more convenient.)

There's no answer to what chords may accompany certain notes, and my examples are very simplistic. You can write even more complicated melodies in several different keys with the proper harmonic context.

EDIT:
Quote by GuitarMunky
Listen and choose a chord that sounds appropriate for the song.


Also, this.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Sep 5, 2011,
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
Listen and choose a chord that sounds appropriate for the song.

Went with this advice. Worked well. Now I feel stupid that I didn't try this before

Edit: I also sorta went with my own advice by playing the chord that went with the first note of the measure(which were E and C#m) Sounded pretty nice.
Last edited by fluffymuffins at Sep 5, 2011,