#1
Hey everyone! What a great site this is!

And what great decission to begin playing guitar!
Ive been playing on and off now for about 2 years and ive learned some fingerstyle
blues songs from Mississippi john hurt and som Lightnin hopkins style etc.
Only very basic stuff.

Now recently i got myself an electric guitar and i started practicing scales and licks and stuff like that.

The thing is. I dont think i ever quite understood what scales i can play when?

Lets say for an example an E blues.
What scales can i play? I heard that i can play any major scale over it?
Some just sounds weird imo?

And what about the minor scales?
What are they for? and when?

etc. etc :P


I hope you can help me see the light on this one!
-Remmo
#2
Quote by Remmo87
Hey everyone! What a great site this is!

And what great decission to begin playing guitar!
Ive been playing on and off now for about 2 years and ive learned some fingerstyle
blues songs from Mississippi john hurt and som Lightnin hopkins style etc.
Only very basic stuff.

Now recently i got myself an electric guitar and i started practicing scales and licks and stuff like that.

The thing is. I dont think i ever quite understood what scales i can play when?

Lets say for an example an E blues.
What scales can i play? I heard that i can play any major scale over it?
Some just sounds weird imo?

And what about the minor scales?
What are they for? and when?

etc. etc :P


I hope you can help me see the light on this one!
-Remmo


You should start off with the E blues scale (that's an E minor pentatonic scale with a Bb added). That's the most basic scale to use over it.
#3
Thanks for the answer.

Anyone able to go a little bit deeper into my question though?
Give a noobie (me) some basic music theory
Last edited by Remmo87 at Sep 5, 2011,
#4
Quote by Remmo87

The thing is. I dont think i ever quite understood what scales i can play when?

You should play the scale that relates to the key (key of E, major scale of E), at least when starting out.

Lets say for an example an E blues.
What scales can i play? I heard that i can play any major scale over it?
Some just sounds weird imo?

That is because you cannot play certain major scales over E at all, they will sound terrible, you are best starting off with the E blues scale.


And what about the minor scales?
What are they for? and when?

Minor scales are usually what people solo with, the difference is the minor scale is not the same as the major scale. So if your in the key of E, your minor is not e minor. I recommend looking up theory, they even have some at this site.




I highlighted the answers, sorry i didnt break that up well.
#5
have a look at Justinguitar. There's a separate section on scales too. The Minor Pentatonic scale is used mostly and some people add major notes here and there.
#6
Quote by hansome21
I highlighted the answers, sorry i didnt break that up well.



Thanks for the answers both!

Just to make 1 thing clear.
Would this make sence:

Lets say for instance its a Blues in E.
Would i use the A pentatonic blues scale in the A parts of the song and the E pentatonic blues scale in the E part, and B pentatonic blues scale in the B part?

Or would i just pick one?

And so on and so on, with Blues in C, G, D or whatever


Hope that makes any sence
#7
Quote by Remmo87
Thanks for the answers both!

Just to make 1 thing clear.
Would this make sence:

Lets say for instance its a Blues in E.
Would i use the A pentatonic blues scale in the A parts of the song and the E pentatonic blues scale in the E part, and B pentatonic blues scale in the B part?

Or would i just pick one?

And so on and so on, with Blues in C, G, D or whatever


Hope that makes any sence


Use the E blues scale over all the chords, the way you adapt your playing to the chord changes is not by using completely different scales, it's by emphasizing different notes in the same scale.
#8
Start off with just one for the whole song. The one you choose should be the key whch the song is in. Ex: Key is Em. Scale Em pentatonic or E blues. Get it?
جورجيا الاباحى؟ أيها
#9
Have a look at basic keys - The chords in the progression don't all have to be the same as the key, so in a key of C you could have a progression of C G A D and solo in C major, because C is the key.

To use your example, the key of E could have the E chord, A chord and B chord in and since all of those chords are in key, you can play the E major scale over the whole progression. Like I said have a look at keys, chords and basic scales to get started. The crusade column on the main site is a great way to get started in theory, as is musictheory.net
#10
Okay so the chords in the Key of E are: Emaj, F#min, G#min, Amaj, Bmaj, C#min, and B7th.

If a song used these chords (for e.g the Beatle's tune "Don't let me down uses F#min, Emaj, Bmaj, and John Mayer's Slow Dancing in a Burning room Uses C#min, Amaj, Emaj) then you can use the Emaj pentatonic/blues hybrid scale over the song.
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
___________________________________________________
#12
What's great about blues is that if you're playing in the Key of E, all you need is the E blues scale if you want to create solos. Even when the chords change, the E blues scale will still work. That's a really good way to get started. And when in doubt, just use the minor pentatonic. People have made careers out of playing that one scale.

Once you get that down you can start expanding on it by adding additional tones. Listen to some Robben Ford tunes. His style is rooted in pentatonics, but he throws in some diminished scale usage and chromatic runs to really make it exciting.
#13
You technically can get away with playing pentatonics and the blues scale over the whole thing, but if you really try to follow the changes in a blues format you will find that there are lots of notes which are not contained in the pentatonics that go with the chords and work musicially. And you can also make use of notes outside of the chord tones in some contexts.

So if one is interested in expanding beyond pentatonics, I'd first suggest starting with the chord tone approach. So, say, if we have a blues in E, just focusing on the thirds of each chord, we get G# for E7, C# for A7, and D# for B7. None of those notes are contained in E minor pentatonic, but they work perfectly. What's distinctive about a blues is not pentatonic or blues scales, but the changes.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 7, 2011,