#1
I would like to know the different possible uses of a DI box.

Especially I want to know if it's useful to connect the premamp out of my amp to a direct box and then connect the DI box to an audio interface. Would it get rid of the noise? Would it be good to connect an electroacoustic guitar in the DI box before connecting into an interface?

I read somehere that it allowed to retain the character of the amp while playing at low volume... is that so?

I think there are other uses also. like for using long cables ... I would like to know about it.

Would like to know some products that do the job for each situation. There seems to be a lot of dfferent types of DI boxes.

Thanks
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Last edited by sly fly at Sep 5, 2011,
#2
dibox is used to split signal... for example if you were recording your guitar via miced up amp and you'd also like to keep a clean (not amp) signal in case of bad amp settings, so you can run the signal through amp with better ones... then you'd need a dibox

it goes like this

Guitar -> DI BOX (one out directly to interface)(other out to amp - which is mic'd up - mic connected to interface)

another example would be if were a basist and you played at a show.. Soud technician would like to have your clean bass signal in the mixer as well as the amp signal in order to blend the two together...

Bass -> DI BOX (one out to amp)(one out to mixer -PA)

and so on...
Active diboxes can add some noise which is only noticable when using in studio i suppose... don't know about noise reduction you speak of...
Hope you fing my post helpful, best regards!
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#3
Serjem mentioned two good uses, but I think you're confusing DI boxes with a few other things TS.


For a start, a DI box is not used to carry a line level (or any level) signal long distances without signal degradation - to do that you simply fit a resistor/capacitor network at one end of the chain, with the resistor value determined by the length of the cable run/capacitance you need to control to prevent the roll-off of low end and loss of brightness. At least, that's what I remember of the electronics behind it - may just be a resistor at the end and no caps.


Also, the thing about retaining character is not true - I presume you're confusing it with a power attenuator, which allows you to crank an amp while limiting the available power to the speakers, without causing issues for the power amp. A DI box placed between a speaker out and a speaker cab would simply be fried by the power, not to mention could affect the load seen by the power amp and damage the outpur transformers.

DI boxes, in addition to what was said by Serjam, are usually used to get a good quality clean signal from an instrument source, ready to be ran into the PA, recording software/amp sims, or studio outboard.

Passive DI boxes may also be used in reverse, for the purpose of reamping guitars, however they are not likely to give the same feel for high gain stuff as a purpose-built re-amp box would.
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#4
Quote by DisarmGoliath



Also, the thing about retaining character is not true - I presume you're confusing it with a power attenuator, which allows you to crank an amp while limiting the available power to the speakers, without causing issues for the power amp. A DI box placed between a speaker out and a speaker cab would simply be fried by the power, not to mention could affect the load seen by the power amp and damage the outpur transformers.
.


This is what I read :"One other very cool aspect of using a direct box for home recording is that you can hook up your amplifier’s speaker output to most DI’s input and switch it to the “Speaker” setting, which will allow you to use your screaming 100-watt tube amplifier to record at home, without disturbing a soul.
http://blog.discmakers.com/2009/10/do-you-need-a-direct-box-for-home-recording/
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#5
True some DI boxes have built in attenuators...

But in reality, Serjem covered the main uses of a DI box. The XLR out of them can go longer distances being it's a balanced connection but the TS out which goes to the guitar amp should be kept shorter.
Last edited by moody07747 at Sep 7, 2011,
#6
Quote by sly fly
This is what I read :"One other very cool aspect of using a direct box for home recording is that you can hook up your amplifier’s speaker output to most DI’s input and switch it to the “Speaker” setting, which will allow you to use your screaming 100-watt tube amplifier to record at home, without disturbing a soul.
http://blog.discmakers.com/2009/10/do-you-need-a-direct-box-for-home-recording/

Some may well come with an attenuator, but that is a DI box and an attenuator, just put in the same unit. A DI box does not act as an attenuator on its own. And I'm yet to come across one at any venue that has a built in attenuator, so don't think of them as anything common. Put a standard DI box in that part of the signal chain and I can safely say it will not survive long.
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