#1
I am surrounded by people who can't sing in pitch!!!

Why do people sing out of tune!? Is there a way to help them? How do you train the ear?

Please help!!
Esp Eclipse II
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#2
Depends on if they even want to be helped first. If they won't realize they're out of tune and/or deny it, there's no point in even trying.

You can train the ear and your voice really by practicing it like any other instrument. Hit a note on a piano or guitar and match the pitch with your voice. Sing scales, do warm ups, and just use your ear to tell you if you're tuning's out or in. I am assuming you can sing with pitch-correction because you'll have to know what you're talking about if you intend to correct and help these people.

Or surround yourself with those who can sing and your problem is solved.
We're all alright!
#3
They don't realize they're out of tune! And when I tell them they are really surprised.

"I am assuming you can sing with pitch-correction because you'll have to know what you're talking about if you intend to correct and help these people"

Say what?
Esp Eclipse II
Fender Strat LoneStar
Martin D35 Custom Shop
Vox Night Train
Vox Heritage cab 1x12
#4
I'm guessing you sing well and in tune compared to these people. You'll have to or else they're not going to take you seriously. You have to know what you're doing in order to help someone.
We're all alright!
#5
Quote by drying out
I am surrounded by people who can't sing in pitch!!!

Why do people sing out of tune!? Is there a way to help them? How do you train the ear?


People sing out of tune mostly because they haven't trained their ears to hear pitches precisely, so they're stabbing in the dark. You can find lots of resources on ear training - I recommend "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician" by Keith Wyatt et al - but singers need to work on their ear more than any other musician.
#6
Quote by Mathedes
I'm guessing you sing well and in tune compared to these people. You'll have to or else they're not going to take you seriously. You have to know what you're doing in order to help someone.


I just don't know what you mean by being able to sing with pitch-correction.
Esp Eclipse II
Fender Strat LoneStar
Martin D35 Custom Shop
Vox Night Train
Vox Heritage cab 1x12
#7
It's just another way of saying you know how to be in tune and can correct out-of-tune people.
We're all alright!
#8
There are a few reasons:
- they might be able to "hear" the note they're *supposed* to be singing, but just lack the control over their voice in order to actually hit the note accurately.
- they might lack the technique required to hit the notes accurately with any consistency (poor breathing, for instance, means singing the first half of the line okay, but going flat as they run out of air towards the end of the line)
-the simply can't hear in their mind the note they are supposed to be singing. You can't hit a target you can't see.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
I think a lot of people are shy and uncertain about their singing voice or their ability to sing "on key". Consequently, they don't sing out, tending to swallow their words, which contributes to singing flat of the desired pitch.

Many people don't hear themselves well. That's the old "do I sound like that", tape recorder syndrome.

Toward the top of a person's vocal range, the diaphragm must be employed to push air into the "mask" as it is called to raise the pitch above a person's tendency to sing flat. This is lack of training, uncertainty, and perhaps a touch of laziness.

Most songs stretch a person's vocal range a bit, which as an average, is only about an octave or so.

If you would like to hear an extreme example of employing the diaphragm to raise pitch and create sustain, give a listen to Ian Anderson's, (Jethro Tull), older albums. "Aqualung" is a sparkling example of Mr. Anderson's vocal antics.

Plan "B"; just sing Dylan's "Blowing in the Wind". The melody only has a sixth of range. Even the average person should be able to sing it in at least four keys.
#10
Quote by drying out
I am surrounded by people who can't sing in pitch!!!

Why do people sing out of tune!? Is there a way to help them? How do you train the ear?

Please help!!


...I don't understand what you hope to gain out of this thread. A method so you can instantly teach everyone around you how to sing? If you're a singer and you're going around trying to "help" everyone else sing, please stop. People probably think you're a douchebag. If someone really wants to learn to sing on pitch, they will. Otherwise, leave them alone. You're going to have a hard life if this is the kind of thing that drives you insane.
#11
Quote by YetAnotherMuso
...I don't understand what you hope to gain out of this thread. A method so you can instantly teach everyone around you how to sing? If you're a singer and you're going around trying to "help" everyone else sing, please stop. People probably think you're a douchebag. If someone really wants to learn to sing on pitch, they will. Otherwise, leave them alone. You're going to have a hard life if this is the kind of thing that drives you insane.


^- this.