#1
hey guys had just learned the Natural minor scale the 5 positions and well im gonna practice this scale alot so i can memorize and eventually know it by heart... anyway my main question was

when is it ok to play natural minor scale like over what kind of chords? and is it a versatile scale


I learned the scale in the key in A ... soon as I feel comfortable with all 5 positions of the scale ill most likely move the scale to a different key ....

thanx UG
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#2
As versatile as you make it.

For the A minor scale? A Minor, D minor, E minor, C major, F major, G major, B diminished. But that's just basic triads; and are nowhere near all of the chords you could play it over.

It'd definitely be worth it to look into modes if you're wondering about proper phrasing.
#3
Quote by SoA_Joseph
It'd definitely be worth it to look into modes if you're wondering about proper phrasing.


No it wouldn't. Modes have nothing to do with phrasing.

The simple answer is "you use the natural minor (or any minor scale) over a song that is in a minor key". So if you're in a minor key, you can use it, irrespective of whether the chord underneath is major or minor. Most songs will use a combination of both major and minor (and other) chords. The presence of these chords alone does not affect whether the song is in a major or minor key, or where it resolves to.

If you study up about keys you'll understand a little better.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
The natural minor scale has 7 positions. Are you sure you haven't learned the minor pentatonic?
#5
Quote by Declan87
The natural minor scale has 7 positions. Are you sure you haven't learned the minor pentatonic?


If you learn the CAGED positions, there's only 5. That's most likely what TS has learnt.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
Quote by Declan87
The natural minor scale has 7 positions. Are you sure you haven't learned the minor pentatonic?


There are a gazillion ways to play it. I tend to play it using three positions, and can cover the whole neck with ease.
#7
To the OP's question:

There's no simple answer to this. The diatonic chords in Am are Am Bdim C, Dm, Em, F, and G.

But you can use lots of other chords in there, too. Bb. You can find ways to use E and D major, Bm, C#m, F#m, and others. Start with those first seven - the diatonic chords. And then expand to these others as you get more comfortable. The key is to listen to what you're playing and how it reacts to the chord - don't think of it as just positions on a fretboard, it's SOUNDS and you'll find that some sounds work really well with some chords, and not with others.

But you're always safe in you stay in the seven diatonic chords.

Remember, however, that you're in Am and not C Major is everything resolves to an A. Think of the A note as "home" and you should be just fine.
#8
thanx
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said