#1
Okay I just got an Ibanez Gio GSA, it is the squier of Ibanez's but plays and sound nice.

It's got a floating bridge (or tremolo, I'm going to refer to it as a bridge) and I've had some problems with it staying in tune, i bought it from a music shop so I took it back and they sort of fixed the problems, but it still drifts out of tune and if I bend it too far or dive too deep with the whammy it'll go sharp and flat on different strings.

So I thought since I won't be changing the tuning much anyway I could lock the strings in place.

I did some research and heard about Locking Tuners and Locking nuts. How expensive are either of them? I'm awful at guitar fixing so I'd get it done in a music shop. Whats the pro's and con's of both? I've heard locking Nuts makes the intonation out, is this true?

I play a lot of funky solo's so I use a lot of string bending and whammy so I need to be able to do it with the confidence that my guitar isn't going to go out of tune :/
#2
I'm pretty sure your bridge isn't a floating trem if you don't already have a locking nut. Its probably a standard strat-style trem. In that scenario locking tuners would be the better option. You can get a good set of locking tuners for around $60 and they don't require any serious modification to your guitar.
#3
I thought floating tremelo's can go up and down? Mine can, and my friend who has a floating trem fender thinks it is. Also if I push down on the bridge it has the same effect so I'm pretty sure it's floating, do you know how much a music shop is likely to charge for installing the locking tuners?
#4
Man, it sounds like you've got a regular everyday fender trem, just with a tighter spring tension so you can raise the pitch. If you dont want to use the trem, flip it over and tighten the two screws that tension the springs.
If you still want to use the tremolo, lube the nut with some lem-oil or something like that if you have any, it will let the strings move with the bridge.
#5
http://www.ibanez.com/ElectricGuitars/model-GSA60

typical Fender style trem. A Floyd Rose style would already hav a locking nut installed on the guitar
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#6
Quote by TieMyRope669
Man, it sounds like you've got a regular everyday fender trem, just with a tighter spring tension so you can raise the pitch. If you dont want to use the trem, flip it over and tighten the two screws that tension the springs.
If you still want to use the tremolo, lube the nut with some lem-oil or something like that if you have any, it will let the strings move with the bridge.


This. It doesnt have a floating trem.
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#7
I've had a look on the Ibanez website and it looks similar to the one on my GRG- basically a vintage-style trem raised from the body so it floats. If you want to use the bridge for little quirks in your playing locking tuners should work fine, but if you're doing full dives or using the bar a lot, a locking nut may be of more benefit.
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#8
You'll need a bridge with fine tuners if you want a locking nut. So that isn't an option. Locking tuners will help, but not as much as you may think.

My advice is to change the nut to something like a Graph Tech, and to learn how to tie the strings properly around the tuners. There are mountains of tutorials on Youtube. This will improve tuning stability far more than locking tuners.

Even so, strat style tremolos aren't meant for whammy bar abuse. Even on high quality guitars, they'll still go out of tune if you go all Steve Vai on them. So take it easy with the dive bombs and stuff.
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Last edited by Mad Marius at Sep 6, 2011,
#9
Quote by pigeonmafia
This. It doesnt have a floating trem.


"Floating" refers only to the fact that the tremolo plate doesn't touch the body of the guitar in any way. A standard, 6-screw Fender vintage style tremolo can be set to float easily, as can many other non-locking tremolos on the market.

"Floating" does not refer to to the bridge being set to allow some pull-up, as the bridge plate may still be in contact with the body. If the tremolo is set up to allow for some pull-up, floating the tremolo will help to keep tuning more stable.

I'd recommend you have the nut replaced with a well cut bone nut, and that you lubricate it with the silicone differential lubricant RC guys use on their model cars (works much better than anything else I've tried). When stringing the guitar, make sure the string is set well on the tuners and stretch the strings out.
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#11
With a cheap trem like that I'd set it up for dive only. Get a good quality, well cut nut (bone, graphite) and some locking tuners if you're willing to spend the cash.
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#12
Like Prophet said, you need well cut, well lubricated nut for any guitar to stay in tune (well, except ones with locking nuts, I guess).

Also, if the tremolo's just worn out (which isn't uncommon with knife-edge trems in the GSA's price range), it'll always go out of tune, independant of your nut and tuners.
#13
Quote by Prophet of Page
"Floating" refers only to the fact that the tremolo plate doesn't touch the body of the guitar in any way. A standard, 6-screw Fender vintage style tremolo can be set to float easily, as can many other non-locking tremolos on the market.

"Floating" does not refer to to the bridge being set to allow some pull-up, as the bridge plate may still be in contact with the body. If the tremolo is set up to allow for some pull-up, floating the tremolo will help to keep tuning more stable.

I'd recommend you have the nut replaced with a well cut bone nut, and that you lubricate it with the silicone differential lubricant RC guys use on their model cars (works much better than anything else I've tried). When stringing the guitar, make sure the string is set well on the tuners and stretch the strings out.


this is correct. i have a 6 screw and a 2 point non locking trems and both are set to float. as mentioned a big part of keeping them in tune is a well cut nut. locking tuners do help but aren't critical. your strings need to be in as straight a line as possible coming across the nut and going to the tuners. i used to have a cheap Ibby for my sit around and watch tv guitar so i know they can be made to stay in tune reasonably well.