#2
subjective question has subjective answer?

hollowbodies and semi hollows don't have better cleans. they just have a different sound that you probably prefer over a solidbody.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
They don't, they have qualities in their clean tones that are different to solid-body guitars, and you happen to prefer them.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#4
What the Cube said. Geometry is usually right.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#5
generally because they do not have as much "perceived power" in the pickups. for example if you have a les paul with 57' classics and a hollow body with 57' classics the lp will be more powerful for thus less clean. reason being is with all the wood (solid) none of the sound dissapates and is forced out through the pickups. with a hollowbody the sound/resonation dissapates and breathes more.

that is my answer, i dont have a good way of describing it but this is why certain guitars sound heavier then others. i have a lp with a 57 classic in the neck and a 61' sg with a 57' in the neck. The LP is way more powerful, bassy, and has a lot more 'girth' to the sound. the SG still sounds good but with much less weight it is considerable thinner.

there is a reason artists where trying to find the heaviest les pauls back in the 70's. TONE.

sorry for the abysmal spelling and punctuation, i am not going to correct it but i just woke up
Gibson 58 VOS, Gibson Rich Robinson ES-335, Fender Strat, Fender RoadWorn 50's Tele, Gibson LP Jr Special

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Last edited by thejester at Sep 7, 2011,
#6
Probably because you can hear a bit of the resonance of the hollow wood in the strings,
Ever tried yelling into your pickups?
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#8
I guess it depends on what you want your guitar to sound like. If you like a warmer, woodier sound then yeah they sound better. But if you like ultra-bright chimey tones then they might not be your first choice. To each his own...
Current Gear:
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#9
I don't think it's universally true. Or at least it's subjective. I just traded a 339 for a Les Paul, because I liked the cleans better, among other reasons.
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#10
Its cause they are more like an acoustic guitar.

Durr.

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#12
As several of the above posts have said, in varying ways, a hollow-body or semi-hollow-body will tend to have less sustain than a solid-body. (And an acoustic guitar has even less sustain.) The reason is that with a sound cavity, more of the energy from the vibrating string is transferred to both the air in the sound cavity/chamber, as well as in some cases to the wood of the top. The side-effect of this energy transfer is that the string's vibrations dampen out faster. So what gets passed through the pick-up to the amp has a more rapid decay (less sustain). The more acoustic-like a hollow-body is, the larger the initial transient is, and the faster the decay is. A second way to judge this is that the louder an electric guitar is when unamplified (due to having a sound cavity/chamber, and possibly a top that behaves like a soundboard, with energy transferred from the bridge), the less sustain it will have when amplified.

The "trick" that Gibson basically invented with the ES-335 was to run a solid piece of wood under the pick-ups and bridge. This prevents energy from the strings being dissipated through the bridge into the top. (The opposite of what is supposed to happen with a traditional arch-top guitar, or a violin, for that matter...) So you get better sustain than with a full hollow-body.

Violins have basically no sustain (listen to a violin that is being plucked - pizzicato style). So "sustain" in violin playing is artificially created by using a bow that keeps the strings vibrating, throughout the length of the note.
Last edited by rschleicher at Sep 7, 2011,
#13
Quote by rschleicher
As several of the above posts have said, in varying ways, a hollow-body or semi-hollow-body will tend to have less sustain than a solid-body. (And an acoustic guitar has even less sustain.) The reason is that with a sound cavity, more of the energy from the vibrating string is transferred to both the air in the sound cavity/chamber, as well as in some cases to the wood of the top. The side-effect of this energy transfer is that the string's vibrations dampen out faster. So what gets passed through the pick-up to the amp has a more rapid decay (less sustain). The more acoustic-like a hollow-body is, the larger the initial transient is, and the faster the decay is. A second way to judge this is that the louder an electric guitar is when unamplified (due to having a sound cavity/chamber, and possibly a top that behaves like a soundboard, with energy transferred from the bridge), the less sustain it will have when amplified.

The "trick" that Gibson basically invented with the ES-335 was to run a solid piece of wood under the pick-ups and bridge. This prevents energy from the strings being dissipated through the bridge into the top. (The opposite of what is supposed to happen with a traditional arch-top guitar, or a violin, for that matter...) So you get better sustain than with a full hollow-body.

Violins have basically no sustain (listen to a violin that is being plucked - pizzicato style). So "sustain" in violin playing is artificially created by using a bow that keeps the strings vibrating, throughout the length of the note.


Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#14
Quote by AcousticMirror

Short explanation:

Solid body -> hit strings -> wood of body resonates with strings -> keeps strings moving for longer because the wood is "moving"

Hollowbody - > hit strings -> wood of body resonates with strings, but there's less wood to resonate -> keeps strings moving for a shorter period because the vibrations from the wood are disappearing faster

So a solid-body or semi-hollow guitar will have more sustain than a hollow-body guitar.
#15
well, thanks alot, i have no personal experience with hollowbodies, its just that they were cleans guitar cause i see them used across the board for cleans/small overdrive songs. the best example I have is Story of the Year's Sidewalks live...
Last edited by n1ckn1ce at Sep 7, 2011,