#1
What are all the factors that influence the guitar's sound (not counting pedals, amps or the player) and how much do each factor influence the sound? Eg. The pick-ups, the wood, the strings, the shape (?), etc.
#2
All of the above mentioned stuff, but also things like the shape of the pick, picking dynamics, the materials the strings are made of, they way they're wound, the nut, the bridge and every other bit of hardware right down to screws. Everything, really. But they all influence the sound to varying degrees. Such as, the screws you have in won't influence it nearly as much as your picking dynamics.
#4
Quote by rockstar2be
What are all the factors that influence the guitar's sound (not counting pedals, amps or the player) and how much do each factor influence the sound? Eg. The pick-ups, the wood, the strings, the shape (?), etc.

well if you arent counting the pedals amp and player, you are taking out 3 big parts.

honestly, the wood really doesnt count as much as people think. the pick ups are picking up the string vibrations, the pickups add EQ themselves, the signal then goes to volume and tone pots which change the tone, then to the cable, which can affect the tone as well, then to the pedals which can shape the tone, then to the amp which probably shapes the tone the most. amp EQ, different channels, different tubes (if its a tube amp), different cicuitry, different speakers even. speakers are actually a huge part that most people forget about. you'd be surprised how much a speaker can change the sound. sometimes a tube change and speaker change can turn an amp great.

now, going back to the start, the string, obviously the string needs to vibrate. so how you pick and what you use the pick can change the tone. all picks make a pick noise. different picks have different noise and a different attack. now as for the wood, liike i said it doesnt play a huge part. ive heard guitars made of plastic, plywood, or those guitars with no body that sounded really nice and full. wood really only makes a big difference acoustically. but when you factor in everything in the signal line of an electric guitar, it means little to nothing. worse than that, its almost impossible to test because even if we put the same type of pickups in two different wood guitars, they will probably sound different because even though they are the sae type of pickups they arent actually the same.

what the wood does, or at least what is claimed, is it brings out certain harmonics and undertones in the strings vibration. so some sound bright, or warm, or something inbetween. however again, with everything in the signal path it hardly makes a difference. a pickup change, speaker change, tube change or even just an EQ adjustment will make a far larger impact on tone than different wood.