#1
So I did have this written down at one point but now I can't seem to find it.

Let's say someone says, play a i iv vi ii in C major. I know that the chords are C , F. A and D. But how do I know which one's are minor and which are major ?

Also on another note, let's say the progression is in C minor. and say it's there is a iii in it. Do you use the E or do you flat it and make it an Eb because in a minor key you flat the third?
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#2
In a major key..

I- Major/7th
II- Minor/7th
III- Minor/7th
IV- Major/7th
V- Major/Dominant 7th
VI- Minor/7th
VII- Diminished/half-diminished 7th

The 7th's can change the type of chord, as shown above with the V & VII


As for your second question- yes also flatten the VI and VII
#3
In my theory classes, uppercase numbers always meant major, lowercase numbers meant minor.
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#4
Quote by Lugnaz987
So I did have this written down at one point but now I can't seem to find it.

Let's say someone says, play a i iv vi ii in C major. I know that the chords are C , F. A and D. But how do I know which one's are minor and which are major ?

In major, your situation is easy, you simply have to look at the notes that exist within the scale itself. Let me show you a few examples. for each chord, I will write the entire C major scale with the chord-tones in bold.

I
C D E F G A B C = C + E + G = major

IV
C D E F G A B C = F + A + C = major

vi
C D E F G A B C = A + C + E = minor

ii
C D E F G A B C = D + F + A = minor

Also on another note, let's say the progression is in C minor. and say it's there is a iii in it. Do you use the E or do you flat it and make it an Eb because in a minor key you flat the third?

unless otherwise specified, it would be the bIII (Eb).
Last edited by nmitchell076 at Sep 7, 2011,
#5
You take into account the flats and sharps in the key signature. So in the key of C the A (A C E) and D (D F A) would be minor chords.

Also, generally, when using roman numerals to represent chords, capital letters are used to show major chords, and lower case letters are used to represent minor chords.

And if the progression is in C minor, yes it would be Eb. Eb major to be specific (Eb G Bb)

Also, this is only to my understanding, if I'm completely wrong, someone correct me please.
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#6
That's a very good point about the uppercase/lowercase numerals- I had forgotten this. Now I'VE learnt something too! Thanks guys
#7
Quote by Lugnaz987

Let's say someone says, play a i iv vi ii in C major. I know that the chords are C , F. A and D. But how do I know which one's are minor and which are major ?


Somebody already mentioned the capitals thing, but when someone's talking you won't know that.

Usually I would say that you use the diatonic chords in the scale unless they tell you otherwise. eg, One-Four-Six-Two would be C major, F major, A minor, and D minor.

However, that's not always the case! Usually it's incumbent upon them to tell you do something different - eg, "One-Four-Major Six-two."


Also on another note, let's say the progression is in C minor. and say it's there is a iii in it. Do you use the E or do you flat it and make it an Eb because in a minor key you flat the third?


You use the relevant key, so it's Eb.
#8
It's been written out wrong. Here's how it should be: I IV vi ii
The lower case chords are minor and the upper case are major.

In a major key, the chords are as followed:
I - maj
ii - min
iii - min
IV - maj
V - maj
vi - min
vii0 - diminshed

The 0 after the vii is supposed to be a small o [like degrees celsius].

So C and F are major, and D and A are minor.
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