#1
(Newbie and proud) ... Does a humbucker pickup occupy much of the space in the cavity behind the pickguard or is it just for wires? I have a SSS standard MX10 start (Fender) and want to go HSS on it. Will the bridge cavity need to be routed? Thanks!
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#2
That depends. Sometimes the guitars are routed with a complete cavity that will handle any pup configuration other times they are specifically made with their pup config cavity (So three small holes and a wire track). Basically you will need to unscrew your pick guard and look.

But yes a humbucker will take up more cavity space than a single and if the routing doesnt allow for it natively then you will have to route out the extra space
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#3
Quote by barnesybaby
That depends. Sometimes the guitars are routed with a complete cavity that will handle any pup configuration other times they are specifically made with their pup config cavity (So three small holes and a wire track). Basically you will need to unscrew your pick guard and look.

But yes a humbucker will take up more cavity space than a single and if the routing doesnt allow for it natively then you will have to route out the extra space

^This

Also the newer Fenders tend to have what is known as a "swimming pool route".

The only thing in this case would be to find a pick guard that will fit the pup configuration you want.
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
#4
"swimming pool route" that is the phrase I was looking for!! I knew it had something to do with water. Thank you Alucard817

Also be aware when you buy the pickguard that the screw placement varies on strats depending on if they have Mexican or American fittings. A quick google will help you know which is which but if you buy the wrong one you'll be drilling extra holes into your guitar
Current Gear
-----------------
Washburn WI66 Pro //
Ibanez Prestige SA1260 //
Schecter C1 Blackjack //
Fernandes Ravelle Elite //
Wahburn HB35 Semi-Hollowbody
Blackstar HT40
#5
More modern Squiers have the swimming pool route; Usually modern (Mexican) Fenders only have an HSH, or HSS route, though, and practically every guitar in the standard series uses a HSS route since they use the same bodies for the SSS and HSS versions. You can achieve what you want with one of those routes.

Either way, just check underneath your pickguard to see what routing you have. Google "Strat pickup cavities HSS" (no quotes) for reference.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


Fender MIM Stratocaster
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#6
I took the pickguard up and felt underneath it (Broke a string in the process) and it has 3 separate cavities. Bridge one is angled with the pickup.
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#7
The routing in the guitar seems to vary from my experience. My 2009 MIM Strat had an HSS routing. My Squier Affinity from the same year had the universal rout. Yet another Squier I worked on had an HSS. Both 2009 Affinitys had different routs. Fender's MIM Strats seem to stick to HSS for the most part.

But nowdays they've got the single coil sized humbuckers. Sure the magnetic field is different, but playing at a gigging volume they still sound pretty heavy to me. And the plus side is no routing out your guitar or getting a new pickguard.
#8
Quote by Fenderexpx50
The routing in the guitar seems to vary from my experience. My 2009 MIM Strat had an HSS routing. My Squier Affinity from the same year had the universal rout. Yet another Squier I worked on had an HSS. Both 2009 Affinitys had different routs. Fender's MIM Strats seem to stick to HSS for the most part.

But nowdays they've got the single coil sized humbuckers. Sure the magnetic field is different, but playing at a gigging volume they still sound pretty heavy to me. And the plus side is no routing out your guitar or getting a new pickguard.


:O single coil sized hum buckers?!?! What are they called?!
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#9
You probably have heard of Seymour Duncan Hot Rails. Basically a two blade humbucking pickup in the same housing as a regular single coil. The magnetic field is different with these. It's smaller than what you'd find in a regular humbucker, but like I said they still get heavy.

So there's Hot Rails, Dimarzio has a few, Fast Track, Chopper, Tone Zone S, I think the Cruiser is also one of theirs. The S on a Dimarzio means single coil sized. They make a few more of their regular humbuckers in that smaller format, but I can't remember seeing any recently.

This way, all you have to do is get the pickup and install. No routing, no new pickguard. Saves money. I've used Hot Rails a lot in my past. I figured if it's good enough for the likes of Dave Murray, it's fine for me.
#10
Quote by Alucard817
^This

Also the newer Fenders tend to have what is known as a "swimming pool route".

The only thing in this case would be to find a pick guard that will fit the pup configuration you want.


Fender stopped using the swimming pool route a number of years ago. all MIM strats have a humbucker sized route at the bridge. this is done to keep production streamlined. OP just change the pickguard and you'll be good to go.