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#1
And can you give me some tips?

I'm a linguist in the Air Force and I have to learn Pashto. I've yet to start classes, so I thought I'd take this time to improve my study habits and things like that.

I hear that knowing/playing music helps a lot with language.
#2
I guess it does. Here in AZ you have to take two years of a forgien language to get into a college, so I kind of had to do it.
What really helps is being able to understand a language already, not so much speak it, but to pick out the general meaning.
Then I whispered in her ear, fear me dear, for I am Death.


Why are you hiding?
Because the demons from my dreams are everywhere..

Are you arguing with a German guy about how to speak German?
#4
Yeah, English, For obvious reasons. I'm learning German in school as well, even though I don't think I am ever going to use it after the exams..
Quote by CoreysMonster
Why, my pasty danish cracker, I believe you've got it!
#5
Bro, I use it as often as possible. Being a musician you can use it in more ways than just spreaking, try adding a verse in german to a song. if it is done right it will song epic.
Then I whispered in her ear, fear me dear, for I am Death.


Why are you hiding?
Because the demons from my dreams are everywhere..

Are you arguing with a German guy about how to speak German?
#6
Is this in the UK? I was going to go into GCHQ to learn Arabic and Pashto because I thought it would be cool, but I never ended up doing it. It will be hard, but I imagine the course will be intensive. Don't worry about it, nobody on UG can give you any advice. Just make sure you are resting and drinking lots of water and other things conducive to a good learning environment so that you can pick it up as quickly as you are able to.

Good luck!
#7
Hee in Finland both Swedish and English are compulsory.

Swedish sucks.

But listening to lots of English music and picking up the strange words (which most of people don't seem to do) improves your language drastically. At least it has done it for me, and I'm mostly speaking about vocabulary. Don't really know if music really benefits learning languages, though.
#8
Quote by Munq
Hee in Finland both Swedish and English are compulsory.

Swedish sucks.

But listening to lots of English music and picking up the strange words (which most of people don't seem to do) improves your language drastically. At least it has done it for me, and I'm mostly speaking about vocabulary. Don't really know if music really benefits learning languages, though.

I'm going to be a jerk and mention that that of is wrong.
#9
Change your phone and anything else you interact with over to said language.

Find a skype buddy who is a native speaker of said language.

Put labels on everything in your house or desk with the name of whatever is labeled in said language.
#10
Quote by Dirge Humani
I'm going to be a jerk and mention that that of is wrong.


Thanks mate, I'm having my matriculation examination test this month and will remember your correction there
#11
Quote by Dirge Humani
I'm going to be a jerk and mention that that of is wrong.

Wait, what is wrong with it? Is "most of people" not correct, or am I just an idiot?
#12
A fellow airman!!! Good luck with the new language man. My first language was spanish and i learned english in school (i grew up on the border with mexico and my family's mexican). In high school i took 2 years of french which happened to be kinda easy since i already knew a romance language. I've found japanese too be too difficult so i haven't really bothered with it (i'm stationed in Misawa AB, Japan). It's a different set of characters so that makes it to where you have to learn completely from scratch.

It sucks driving offbase and not being able to even know what street you're on!

Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#14
Quote by vagelier
Wait, what is wrong with it? Is "most of people" not correct, or am I just an idiot?

I'm pretty sure it's just "most people".
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Is this in the UK? I was going to go into GCHQ to learn Arabic and Pashto because I thought it would be cool, but I never ended up doing it. It will be hard, but I imagine the course will be intensive. Don't worry about it, nobody on UG can give you any advice. Just make sure you are resting and drinking lots of water and other things conducive to a good learning environment so that you can pick it up as quickly as you are able to.

Good luck!

No, ma'am. I'm in the US Air Force. Pashto looks pretty damn hard to me, but I think I can handle it. I'll be sure to heed your advice.

The course I'm taking packs 5 years of language into 1 year of class, and they expect me to be fluent when it's all over. There are plenty of other Pashto students here, so I think I'll have enough people around to practice with.
#15
Quote by MetalGS3SE
I am a Latin minor in university, and I've studied French to fluency, Spanish to near fluency, and I'm just starting Russian. I'm also a linguistics major, though that has very little to do with learning a foreign language.

The best advice I can give you is to speak the language regularly. Find someone (either in person or online) that is fluent in the language, and talk to them regularly. Even if you aren't very good yet, it makes learning the language much quicker. I took my French courses in immersion environments (where the teacher only allowed French communication) and I learned it so much more quickly than I did Spanish.



Hey, I was wanting to learn latin... Think you could maybe help me with that?
Then I whispered in her ear, fear me dear, for I am Death.


Why are you hiding?
Because the demons from my dreams are everywhere..

Are you arguing with a German guy about how to speak German?
#17
I'm still learning German, since I've finished my English exams with a 9/10. But German is imo an awful language to learn when you're Dutch, so I want to learn Greek instead.
#19
Quote by MetalGS3SE
I am a Latin minor in university, and I've studied French to fluency, Spanish to near fluency, and I'm just starting Russian. I'm also a linguistics major, though that has very little to do with learning a foreign language.

The best advice I can give you is to speak the language regularly. Find someone (either in person or online) that is fluent in the language, and talk to them regularly. Even if you aren't very good yet, it makes learning the language much quicker. I took my French courses in immersion environments (where the teacher only allowed French communication) and I learned it so much more quickly than I did Spanish.

I'm trying to learn Russian. It's intimidating the hell out of me. I still can't remember all the different Cyrillic letters.

Quote by RU Experienced?
Why would you think that's true?

Music is related to mathematics on a theoretical level, but as far as being a musician, it's more closely related to language -- your brain processes listening and playing music similar to how it processes listening to and speaking a language. And if you study voice, international phonetics and diction in different languages are part of your cirriculum.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 9, 2011,
#20
I've studied English and French. I would love to learn Italian and German aswell.
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"And the earth died screaming as I lay dreaming"
#21
Quote by Dirk Gently
Music is related to mathematics on a theoretical level, but as far as being a musician, it's more closely related to language -- your brain processes listening and playing music similar to how it processes listening to and speaking a language. And if you study voice, international phonetics and diction in different languages are part of your cirriculum.

I'm going to go ahead and call bull shit. The only way music can assist you in learning a language is if you listen to music in the foreign tongue you're trying to learn. Even that might not be very helpful because a lot of times when people are singing they overemphasize certain phonemes while making others more subtle. Being a musician will in no way increase your propensity for learning a new language in and of itself.
#22
My first language was Hakka Chinese, second language was Cantonese Chinese, third Language was Mandarin Chinese, fourth language was English, fifth language was Korean. I find the Chinese dialects alright to learn as the grammar is all the same but the tonal differences in the dialects are a little difficult especially if you speak more than 1 dialect - easy to get mixed up seeing as I know 3 variants of Chinese. Korean isn't as difficult as the language itself is around 60% Chinese - very similar in some places. I'd imagine learning Japanese wouldn't be so difficult for me either.

For me, learning the language is best if you immerse yourself in the culture - going to the country is obviously the best way. I learnt most of the other Chinese dialects by way of watching and listening to music and conversation - written Chinese and grammar is always the same but the communication is completely different. Hakka Chinese is my mother tongue and although I speak it, I've predominantly been brought up speaking Cantonese Chinese as it makes up around 95% of the local language in Hong Kong. I only speak Hakka Chinese to my relatives. Mandarin Chinese is something you just pick up as you grow up - it's everywhere on the TV, in music and of course you're required to learn it in High School. I still pick up most of my Mandarin Chinese through listening to speech and conversation. Most Hong Kong people know how to speak and understand Mandarin - not so much the other way around but I'd say maybe 65-70%.
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請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


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Last edited by Harmonius at Sep 9, 2011,
#23
Quote by RU Experienced?
I'm going to go ahead and call bull shit. The only way music can assist you in learning a language is if you listen to music in the foreign tongue you're trying to learn. Even that might not be very helpful because a lot of times when people are singing they overemphasize certain phonemes while making others more subtle. Being a musician will in no way increase your propensity for learning a new language in and of itself.

You can call bullshit all you want. Studies have shown that learning music has benefits in other areas not directly related to music, including math and language skills.

Here's an article from 2007, for example.

The study, which will appear in the April issue of Nature Neuroscience, is the first to provide concrete evidence that playing a musical instrument significantly enhances the brainstem's sensitivity to speech sounds. This finding has broad implications because it applies to sound encoding skills involved not only in music but also in language.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070312152003.htm

Here's a more recent one.

Scientists have discovered that playing an instrument significantly enhances the brain's sensitivity to speech.


Schools which fail to make music a core subject are making a mistake, because it has advantages for the growing brain and would help all children, including those with dyslexia and autism, neuroscientist Professor Nina Kraus said yesterday.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/music-has-the-power-to-shape-a-childs-mind-1905967.html

And another...

http://in.reuters.com/article/2010/07/21/idINIndia-50286920100721

Let's throw in a 4th for good measure.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/168846.php

My wife has a masters degree in music pedagogy, which is the study of how to teach people music, and has done extensive study in her masters coursework about music and the human brain. I'm not just talking out of my ass
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 9, 2011,
#24
Ive always wanted to learn another language and was thinking maybe chinese, but it does look difficult to learn (I only speak english) and I wouldnt know how to go about learning. And there being several chinese languages only confuses things more, which to learn?

I used to want to learn Japanese (went through a phase were I was in love with my perception of the culture) and Ive read it itsnt as hard as it seems to speak.

Maybe Ill try Spanish instead, looks easier and there are a lot of Spanish speakers in the world.
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and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Sep 9, 2011,
#25
I'm Norwegian and I've had to learn English and German, however I've done Japanese too, because I could. :p
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#26
Quote by Dirk Gently
You can call bullshit all you want. Studies have shown that learning music has benefits in other areas not directly related to music, including math and language skills.

Here's an article from 2007, for example.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070312152003.htm

Here's a more recent one.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/music-has-the-power-to-shape-a-childs-mind-1905967.html

And another...

http://in.reuters.com/article/2010/07/21/idINIndia-50286920100721

Let's throw in a 4th for good measure.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/168846.php

My wife has a masters degree in music pedagogy, which is the study of how to teach people music, and has done extensive study in her masters coursework about music and the human brain. I'm not just talking out of my ass

I've not got the time to read that now because I'm about to run out to class but I'm still skeptical. Hopefully you cited the actual article published in scientific journals so I can see whether or not they were crap experiments when I get back. I'd also be very surprised if any of the data you presented were causal and not just correlational.
#27
I had to learn French when I moved out here. I really picked it up by being immersed in it. I had done a bit in school in the UK beforehand, but I quickly found out that learning it in school has NO effect on learning how to speak it in real life.
An Augmented 4th or a Diminished 5th?


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#28
I spent 5 years learning German in school, got an A* at GCSE. In reality, when I went to Germany that summer, I could just barely make myself understood in a shop or whatever. No chance of holding a proper conversation.

So do the opposite of whatever they teach you about languages in school.
#29
Quote by RU Experienced?
I've not got the time to read that now because I'm about to run out to class but I'm still skeptical. Hopefully you cited the actual article published in scientific journals so I can see whether or not they were crap experiments when I get back. I'd also be very surprised if any of the data you presented were causal and not just correlational.

Don't make me go all David Hume up in this mofo.

But I just linked to articles. They reference the teams who did the research. You're more than welcome to do the legwork on your own. But don't dismiss something as "bullshit" just because it seems counter to your intuition at first blush.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Sep 9, 2011,
#30
Quote by Hydra150
Ive always wanted to learn another language and was thinking maybe chinese, but it does look difficult to learn (I only speak english) and I wouldnt know how to go about learning. And there being several chinese languages only confuses things more, which to learn?

I used to want to learn Japanese (went through a phase were I was in love with my perception of the culture) and Ive read it itsnt as hard as it seems to speak.

Maybe Ill try Spanish instead, looks easier and there are a lot of Spanish speakers in the world.


Yeah, go for Spanish, french, or any other Latin based language. Chinese is really confusing, as is Japanesse (as tey are very similar). And if you were to learn Chinese the most modern would be the best to learn, and I think that is Mandarin.
Then I whispered in her ear, fear me dear, for I am Death.


Why are you hiding?
Because the demons from my dreams are everywhere..

Are you arguing with a German guy about how to speak German?
#32
I had to learn a language that was made up from several different languages... it's called 'English'.

I'm actualy a bilingual illiterate, I can't read and write in several languages.
#33
My first language was Tamil but I can't speak it anymore. I could when I was little but I think learning English and using it so much at school kinda destroyed it. I can understand colloquial Tamil fairly well but it doesn't really help unless I'm with my relatives or with people from the same city because the type they speak on the news and stuff (forgot what it's called) is so different, I wouldn't be able to understand a single word of it even if they spoke slower.

I've been exposed to/learning Spanish since 2nd grade so I'd say I'm fairly good at it now. I learned French and Mandarin Chinese for 3 years (preschool to first grade) but I don't remember much of it now.

I can also speak Singlish, if that counts

I'd like to learn German but all the classes at my uni are full right now so I'll have to wait until next year or later.
cat
#34
Quote by Dirk Gently
Don't make me go all David Hume up in this mofo.

But I just linked to articles. They reference the teams who did the research. You're more than welcome to do the legwork on your own. But don't dismiss something as "bullshit" just because it seems counter to your intuition at first blush.

I dismiss it as bullshit because it is counter to the entire body of work that developmental psychologists have produced up to this point, not because of any intuition I may have. I'll check into the articles.

Edit: Shit, I forgot I'm not connected to my schools network at home so I don't have access to the journals article. I'll get you yet Nina Kraus

One obvious confoud I'm suspicious of is that the Children who are enrolled in music lessons may have more involved parents and/or come from a more educated home with a higher socioeconomic status than those who do not take music lessons or those who can't afford an instrument for their child.

The article about identification of pitch-tones which alter meaning in language seems congruent with what I know, but aside from some East Asian languages I don't think that's very common in language.
Last edited by RU Experienced? at Sep 9, 2011,
#35
I took four years of high school Latin. I can understand most of it, and it's most practical use is understanding English vocabulary, as well as picking up odds and ends in other languages.
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#36
I had to learn C++ the other day.
Damn it took me some time but if you know your sintaxis then you are good...


But no really my first languge is Spanish, learnt English from school (elementary school, or middle one, whatever, I don't know the American term to it) up to high school, and learnt Portuguese for 1 year but already forgot about it
#37
Quote by DrakeTheOne
Bro, I use it as often as possible. Being a musician you can use it in more ways than just spreaking, try adding a verse in german to a song. if it is done right it will song epic.


Absolutely not, german is totally lame.
#38
Quote by DrakeTheOne
Bro, I use it as often as possible. Being a musician you can use it in more ways than just spreaking, try adding a verse in german to a song. if it is done right it will song epic.


Idk, usually phrases from another language thrown in a song sound cheesy and lame.
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#39
My mother language is Dutch,
and because I live in Belgium I needed to learn French and German and also English.
So I can speak 4 languages, not bad I think
#40
Quote by RU Experienced?
Why would you think that's true?

It makes sense to me that if you play music and become better at differentiating between slight differences in tones and what-not, you'd become better at hearing tones within language. It's just something I heard. Whether that's true, I don't know.
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