#1
Hey guys,
I've been playing with this Thrash metal group for about a year now and things are really starting to pick up, but I'm still a little unsatisfied with my tone. I'm a Warwick player through and through and I've been recording and playing with my 2003 Thumb bass, which sounds awesome in almost every music, but is just a little off for thrash. I'm trying to get a tone like Anthrax mixed with Coroner. Is there any way you all think I can get this type of tone out of my Warwick? (i know the easy solution would be buy a P-Bass but I love my basses, plus i have no money) Thanks for any suggestions.
#2
easy mode would be tiny amount of overdrive, and for thrash I like to have mids flat and keep bass and treble maxed.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#3
thrash with a warwick!
http://youtu.be/I-xeddQgH44
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#4
I generally set my bass around a 6 or a 7, my mid around 5 or 6, and my treble around 4 or 5. I think it works well for thrash.
#5
What I would do:
-mid scoop. Definitely.
-little drive, just enough to get a good growl
-not quite sure on this, but I got my new flatwounds (d'darrio chrome med. Gauge), and with barely an eq tweaking I got an instant modern exodus tone. I don't know how it would sound with you puckups, but it works with my dean.
Lots of volume. Be heard
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#6
I'd by an Ashdown James LoMenzo pedal. Allows a editable band of overdrive so you can keep certain frequencies clean and blend in some overdrive, allows for a sweet metal tone.
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#7
Quote by ChemicalFire
I'd by an Ashdown James LoMenzo pedal. Allows a editable band of overdrive so you can keep certain frequencies clean and blend in some overdrive, allows for a sweet metal tone.

+1 that's probably the best you can get.
Quote by Stranglehold
That's it, you're all banned.

Quote by stevebomb
If I wanted to listen to something slow, I'd play some hippie music.
#8
What I do is keep the bass and treble flat-ish, and if your EQ differentiates the low mids from the hi mids, you could try scooping the low mids only, while boosting the hi mids a little for a cutting tone.
Professional lurker since 2009.
#9
Quote by ETHANEVIL
What I would do:
-mid scoop. Definitely.

Trust me, this is exactly what NOT to do. This will get you buried in a live band setting. Whenever I work sound in places I see bassists who cut their mids and wonder why they can't be heard clearly in the mix. A tone that sounds good by itself usually sounds like shit when put with the rest of a band.

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#10
Quote by ozzyismetal
Trust me, this is exactly what NOT to do. This will get you buried in a live band setting. Whenever I work sound in places I see bassists who cut their mids and wonder why they can't be heard clearly in the mix. A tone that sounds good by itself usually sounds like shit when put with the rest of a band.

the thing about thrash is you're providing the low end, not the rhythm. You're better off scooping mids in this genre.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#11
I don't see how scooping your mids is a good idea. A lot of good thrash bands have bassists who do that, and they're lost in it, and it's hard to hear the awesome stuff they do sometimes.

I personally think that a good thrash bass tone should provide the low end, but also have enough mid to add to the general "loudness"